Aquatic

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Spotlight

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Ocean series on Youtube (The Economist)

What can I do to protect coral reefs? (NOAA)
What You Can Do (Coral.org)

Related

Pages

Terrestrial (Earth)
Sphere Land, Ice, Water (Ocean), Air, Life (Cell, Gene, Microscope)
Ecosystem Forest, Grassland, Desert, Arctic, Aquatic

Tree of Life
Microorganism
Plant Flower, Tree
Animal
Invertebrate Octopus, Ant, Bee, Butterfly, Spider, Lobster
Vertebrate Fish, Seahorse, Ray, Shark, Frog, Turtle, Tortoise, Dinosaur
Bird, Ostrich, Owl, Crow, Parrot
Mammal Bat, Rabbit, Giraffe, Camel, Horse, Elephant, Mammoth
Whale, Dolphin, Walrus, Seal, Polar Bear, Bear, Cat, Tiger, Lion, Dog, Wolf
Monkey, Chimpanzee, Human

Resources

These are organized by a classification scheme developed exclusively for Cosma. More…

General

Dictionary

aquatic : growing or living in or frequenting water — Webster

OneLook, Free Dictionary, Wiktionary, Urban Dictionary

Encyclopedia

Aquatic ecosystem An aquatic ecosystem is an ecosystem in a body of water. Communities of organisms that are dependent on each other and on their environment live in aquatic ecosystems. The two main types of aquatic ecosystems are marine ecosystems and freshwater ecosystems. — Wikipedia

Encyclopædia Britannica

Introduction


The Aquatic Biome (World’s Biomes, University of California Museum of Paleontology)
Aquatic Ecosystems (National Geographic)

Science

Marine biology is the scientific study of marine life, organisms in the sea. Given that in biology many phyla, families and genera have some species that live in the sea and others that live on land, marine biology classifies species based on the environment rather than on taxonomy.

A large proportion of all life on Earth lives in the ocean. The exact size of this large proportion is unknown, since many ocean species are still to be discovered. The ocean is a complex three-dimensional world covering approximately 71% of the Earth’s surface. The habitats studied in marine biology include everything from the tiny layers of surface water in which organisms and abiotic items may be trapped in surface tension between the ocean and atmosphere, to the depths of the oceanic trenches, sometimes 10,000 meters or more beneath the surface of the ocean. Specific habitats include coral reefs, kelp forests, seagrass meadows, the surrounds of seamounts and thermal vents, tidepools, muddy, sandy and rocky bottoms, and the open ocean (pelagic) zone, where solid objects are rare and the surface of the water is the only visible boundary. The organisms studied range from microscopic phytoplankton and zooplankton to huge cetaceans (whales) 25–32 meters (82–105 feet) in length. Marine ecology is the study of how marine organisms interact with each other and the environment. — Wikipedia

Encyclopædia Britannica


Preservation



Note: This is a 360° Video — press and hold to explore it!

History

The Ocean Through Time (Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History)
Life on Planet Ocean (Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History)

Library

WorldCat, Library of Congress, UPenn Online Books, Open Library

Participation

Education



The otherworldly creatures in the ocean’s deepest depths (Lidia Lins, TED-Ed)

Course

OER Commons: Open Educational Resources

Community

Occupation




What is a Marine Biologist? (Environmental Science)

News

Science Daily, Phys.org

Book

ISBNdb

Government

Document

USA.gov

Adventure


Here are links to the five destinations mentioned in the video.
1 Utter Inn (Västerås, Sweden)
2 Atlantis – The Palm (Dubai, United Arab Emirates)
3 The Manata Resort (Psv-zanzibar, Tanzania)
4 Jules’ Undersea Loadge (Key Largo, Florida)
5 The Muraka (Rangali Island, Maldives)

returntotop

More…

Sea Life News -- ScienceDaily Current events articles in marine biology and science. From beached whales to coral reef bleaching, learn what is happening in today's oceans.

  • A new early whale, Aegicetus gehennae, and the...
    on December 11, 2019 at 7:56 pm

    A newly discovered fossil whale represents a new species and an important step in the evolution of whale locomotion.

  • Why polar bears at sea have higher pollution...
    on December 11, 2019 at 1:35 pm

    As the climate changes, myriad animal populations are being impacted. In particular, Arctic sea-ice is in decline, causing polar bears in the Barents Sea region to alter their feeding and hunting habits. Bears that follow sea-ice to offshore areas have higher pollutant levels than those staying on land -- but why? A new study reports the likely reasons.

  • Natural ecosystems protect against climate change
    on December 10, 2019 at 4:17 pm

    The identification of natural carbon sinks and understanding how they work is critical if humans are to mitigate global climate change. Tropical coastal wetlands are considered important but, so far, there is little data to show the benefits. This study showed that mangrove ecosystems need to be conserved and restored as part of the battle against rising carbon levels in the atmosphere.

  • Killer whale grandmothers boost survival of calves
    on December 9, 2019 at 9:13 pm

    New research finds that killer whale grandmothers who were no longer able to reproduce had the biggest beneficial impact on the survival chances of their grand-offspring. This may be because grandmothers without calves of their own are free to focus time and resources on the latest generation, the researchers suggest.

  • New England fishermen losing jobs due to climate...
    on December 9, 2019 at 9:13 pm

    For decades the biggest threat to the industry has been overfishing, but it is no longer the only threat. According to new research, fluctuations in the climate have already cost some New England fishermen their jobs. This specific effect of climate is distinct from the overall job losses and gains caused by other factors, such as changes in market demand, regulatory changes to curb overfishing, and broader economic trends.


Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories Phys.org internet news portal provides the latest news on science including: Physics, Nanotechnology, Life Sciences, Space Science, Earth Science, Environment, Health and Medicine.

  • Study to help manage shark populations in Pacific...
    on December 11, 2019 at 4:16 pm

    Sharks play a critical role in keeping oceans healthy, balancing the food chain and ensuring species diversity. However, the demand for shark derivatives has led to their exploitation, often without appropriate management strategies in place. In an assessment of Pacific Panama fisheries published in Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems, scientists from the Smithsonian Tropical

  • Can salmon eat their way out of climate change?
    on December 11, 2019 at 2:12 pm

    Warm waters are a threat to cold water fish like salmon and trout. But a study led by researchers at University of California, Davis suggests that habitats with abundant food sources may help buffer the effects of increasing water temperature.

  • Estimates of commercial fish biomass from DNA...
    on December 11, 2019 at 1:09 pm

    A new study published by scientists from the Faroese Marine Research Institute reveals that traces of DNA left behind in seawater can be used to predict the biomass of Atlantic cod. The findings show that the so-called environmental DNA approach can track the regional patterns of commercially important fish in the ocean. The paper, led by Dr. Ian Salter, was published on the 10th December in Nature Communications Biology.

  • Spying on hippos with drones to help conservation...
    on December 10, 2019 at 1:22 pm

    A new UNSW study has shown that using a drone to film hippos in Africa is an effective, affordable tool for conservationists to monitor the threatened species' population from a safe distance, particularly in remote and aquatic areas.

  • A more collective understanding of coastal...
    on December 9, 2019 at 2:49 pm

    With water covering more than 70 percent of the Earth's surface, it's no wonder our planet is nicknamed the Blue Marble. Seen from outer space, our marble is interwoven with swirls of clouds and splotches of land defined by coastlines—372,000 miles worth.