Astronomical Instrument

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Physical Realm
Universe Astronomical Instrument
Galaxy Milky Way, Andromeda
Planetary System Star, Brown Dwarf, Planet, Moon

Solar System Sun
Terrestrial Planet Mercury, Venus, Earth (Moon), Mars
Asteroid Belt Ceres, Vesta
Jovian Planet Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune
Trans-Neptunian Object
Kuiper Belt Pluto, Haumea, Makemake
Scattered Disc Eris, Sedna, Planet X
Oort Cloud Etc. Scholz’s Star
Small Body Comet, Centaur, Asteroid

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These are organized by a classification scheme developed exclusively for Cosma. More…

General

Encyclopedia

Observational astronomy is a division of astronomy that is concerned with recording data about the observable universe, in contrast with theoretical astronomy, which is mainly concerned with calculating the measurable implications of physical models. It is the practice and study of observing celestial objects with the use of telescopes and other astronomical instruments.

Galileo Galilei turned a telescope to the heavens and recorded what he saw. Since that time, observational astronomy has made steady advances with each improvement in a variety astronomical instruments and related methods. — Wikipedia

Observational Astronomy (Eric Weisstein’s World of Astronomy, Wolfram Research)
Observatories & Telescopes (Wolfram Alpha)
Encyclopædia Britannica

Astronomical Instruments, Category (Wikipedia)
Astronomical Instruments, List (Wikipedia)

Introduction



Australian Astronomical Observatory (AAO)

Preservation

History




Galileo and the telescope (The Science Geek)
The History of Astronomy (Ask an Astronomer, Cornell University)

Museum


Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

Library

WorldCat, Library of Congress, UPenn Online Books, Open Library

Participation

Education

Telescopes (NASA.Gov)
Observational Astronomy (Ask an Astronomer, Cornell University)
Telescopes (Ask an Astronomer, Cornell University)
Telescopes (Cosmos4Kids)

Course



Crash Course Astronomy (YouTube)

OER Commons: Open Educational Resources

Community

Occupation


Careers in Astronomy (Ask an Astronomer, Cornell University)

News

Sky & Telescope, ScienceDaily, Phys.org, NPR Archives

Book

ISBNdb

Government

Document

USA.gov

Expression



Acapella Science (YouTube Channel)

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Observing News & Current Celestial Events – Sky & Telescope The essential guide to astronomy / All Sky & Telescope (www.skyandtelescope.com) content is copyrighted. Please contact us for reuse permissions.

  • Is Betelgeuse Approaching a Crossroads?
    by Bob King on February 14, 2020 at 5:28 pm

    Astronomers all over are waiting with bated breath to see what Betelgeuse will do next. Is it going to start brightening again on February 21st? Or will it continue to surprise? The post Is Betelgeuse Approaching a Crossroads? appeared first on Sky & Telescope.

  • Do You Love the Stars? Do Some Astronomy This...
    by Monica Young on February 14, 2020 at 4:56 pm

    Whether you're celebrating Valentine's Day or boycotting it, anyone visiting this site loves the stars. Here's a chance to participate in an effort to make sure future generations love them too. The post Do You Love the Stars? Do Some Astronomy This Valentine’s Day appeared first on Sky & Telescope.

  • Watch the Moon Occult Mars Before Sunrise on...
    by Bob King on February 12, 2020 at 7:04 pm

    Occultations of stars by the Moon occur routinely, but planetary lunar occultations are much rarer birds. That's why I hope you'll make the effort Tuesday morning February 18th to watch the waning crescent Moon occult the planet Mars. The post Watch the Moon Occult Mars Before Sunrise on February 18th appeared first on Sky & Telescope.

  • February 2020: Five Planets & More!
    by Kelly Beatty on January 31, 2020 at 4:49 pm

    If you drag yourself outside before dawn and then wait until after sunset, you can spot all five of the naked-eye planets. And the Winter Hexagon glides high in the evening sky. The post February 2020: Five Planets & More! appeared first on Sky & Telescope.

  • The Latest on Betelgeuse, Plus a Bright Supernova...
    by Bob King on January 29, 2020 at 5:46 pm

    The sky provides. This winter, the fading of Betelgeuse caught us all by surprise. Now, as January wraps up, we can add a new comet discovery and a supernova bright enough to see in a 6-inch telescope to an ever-growing list of seasonal sky wonders. The post The Latest on Betelgeuse, Plus a Bright Supernova and New Comet Iwamoto appeared first on Sky & Telescope.


Space Telescopes News -- ScienceDaily Space Telescopes. Astronomy articles and pictures from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and Chandra X-Ray Telescope and many other leading astronomy institutes from around the world.

  • Beyond the brim, Sombrero Galaxy's halo suggests...
    on February 20, 2020 at 6:52 pm

    These latest Hubble observations of the Sombrero galaxy indicate only a tiny fraction of older, metal-poor stars in the halo, plus an unexpected abundance of metal-rich stars. Past major galaxy mergers are a possible explanation, though the stately Sombrero shows none of the messy evidence of a recent merger of massive galaxies.

  • Sub-Neptune sized planet validated with the...
    on February 20, 2020 at 6:04 pm

    A signal originally detected by the Kepler spacecraft has been validated as an exoplanet using the Habitable-zone Planet Finder.

  • How newborn stars prepare for the birth of planets
    on February 20, 2020 at 6:04 pm

    Astronomers used two of the most powerful radio telescopes in the world to create more than three hundred images of planet-forming disks around very young stars in the Orion Clouds. These images reveal new details about the birthplaces of planets and the earliest stages of star formation.

  • 18-hour year planet on edge of destruction
    on February 20, 2020 at 3:40 pm

    Astronomers from the University of Warwick have observed an exoplanet orbiting a star in just over 18 hours, the shortest orbital period ever observed for a planet of its type.

  • Scientists pioneer new way to study exoplanets
    on February 18, 2020 at 3:47 pm

    A team of scientists using the Low Frequency Array radio telescope in the Netherlands has observed radio waves that carry the distinct signatures of aurorae, caused by the interaction between a star's magnetic field and a planet in orbit around it.


Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories Phys.org internet news portal provides the latest news on science including: Physics, Nanotechnology, Life Sciences, Space Science, Earth Science, Environment, Health and Medicine.

  • Beyond the brim, Sombrero Galaxy's halo suggests...
    on February 20, 2020 at 7:48 pm

    Surprising new data from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope suggests the smooth, settled "brim" of the Sombrero galaxy's disk may be concealing a turbulent past. Hubble's sharpness and sensitivity resolves tens of thousands of individual stars in the Sombrero's vast, extended halo, the region beyond a galaxy's central portion, typically made of older stars. These latest observations of the Sombrero are turning conventional theory on its head, showing only a tiny fraction of older, metal-poor stars […]

  • Sub-Neptune sized planet validated with the...
    on February 20, 2020 at 5:29 pm

    A signal originally detected by the Kepler spacecraft has been validated as an exoplanet using the Habitable-zone Planet Finder (HPF), an astronomical spectrograph built by a Penn State team and recently installed on the 10m Hobby-Eberly Telescope at McDonald Observatory in Texas. The HPF provides the highest precision measurements to date of infrared signals from nearby low-mass stars, and astronomers used it to validate the candidate planet by excluding all possibilities of contaminating […]

  • How newborn stars prepare for the birth of planets
    on February 20, 2020 at 5:15 pm

    An international team of astronomers used two of the most powerful radio telescopes in the world to create more than three hundred images of planet-forming disks around very young stars in the Orion Clouds. These images reveal new details about the birthplaces of planets and the earliest stages of star formation.

  • Eighteen-hour-year planet on edge of destruction
    on February 20, 2020 at 4:28 pm

    Astronomers from the University of Warwick have observed an exoplanet orbiting a star in just over 18 hours, the shortest orbital period ever observed for a planet of its type.

  • Stargazing with computers: What machine learning...
    on February 20, 2020 at 3:20 pm

    Gazing up at the night sky in a rural area, you'll probably see the shining moon surrounded by stars. If you're lucky, you might spot the furthest thing visible with the naked eye—the Andromeda galaxy. It's the nearest neighbor to our galaxy, the Milky Way. But that's just the tiniest fraction of what's out there. When the Department of Energy's (DOE) Legacy Survey of Space and Time (LSST) Camera at the National Science Foundation's Vera Rubin Observatory turns on in 2022, it will take […]