Invertebrate

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General

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Invertebrate : lacking a spinal column
also : of, relating to, or concerned with invertebrate animals — Webster

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Encyclopedia

Invertebrate is an animal that neither possess nor develops a vertebral column (commonly known as a backbone or spine), derived from the notochord. This includes all animals apart from the subphylum Vertebrata. Familiar examples of invertebrates include insects; crabs, lobsters and their kin; snails, clams, octopuses and their kin; starfish, sea-urchins and their kin; jellyfish, and worms.

The majority of animal species are invertebrates. Many invertebrate taxa have a greater number and variety of species than the entire subphylum of Vertebrata. — Wikipedia

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Animals Without Backbones, Invertebrates (Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History)

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