Lion

Cosma Home > Communication > Knowledge > Realm > Terrestrial > Sphere > Life > Animal > Lion

Spotlight

Note: This is a 360° Video — press and hold to explore it!

Related

Pages

Terrestrial (Earth)
Sphere Land, Ice, Water (Ocean), Air, Life (Cell, Gene, Microscope)
Ecosystem Forest, Grassland, Desert, Arctic, Aquatic

Tree of Life
Microorganism
Plant Flower, Tree
Animal
Invertebrate Octopus, Ant, Bee, Butterfly, Spider, Lobster
Vertebrate Fish, Seahorse, Ray, Shark, Frog, Turtle, Tortoise, Dinosaur
Bird, Ostrich, Owl, Crow, Parrot
Mammal Bat, Rabbit, Giraffe, Camel, Horse, Elephant, Mammoth
Whale, Dolphin, Walrus, Seal, Polar Bear, Bear, Cat, Tiger, Lion, Dog, Wolf
Monkey, Chimpanzee, Human

Resources

These are organized by a classification scheme developed exclusively for Cosma. More…

General

Portal

Lions (Martindale’s Reference Desk)

Dictionary

lion : a large heavily built social cat (Panthera leo) of open or rocky areas chiefly of sub-Saharan Africa though once widely distributed throughout Africa and southern Asia that has a tawny body with a tufted tail and a shaggy blackish or dark brown mane in the male — Webster

OneLook, Free Dictionary, Wiktionary, Urban Dictionary

Encyclopedia

Lion (Panthera leo) is a species in the family Felidae; it is a muscular, deep-chested cat with a short, rounded head, a reduced neck and round ears, and a hairy tuft at the end of its tail. The lion is sexually dimorphic; males are larger than females with a typical weight range of 150 to 250 kg (330 to 550 lb) for the former and 120 to 182 kg (265 to 400 lb) for the latter. Male lions have a prominent mane, which is the most recognizable feature of the species. A lion pride consists of a few adult males, related females and cubs. Groups of female lions typically hunt together, preying mostly on large ungulates. The species is an apex and keystone predator, although they scavenge when opportunities occur. Some lions have been known to hunt humans, although the species typically does not. — Wikipedia

Encyclopædia Britannica

Search

WolframAlpha

Preservation

Note: These are 360° videos — press and hold to explore them!



Library

WorldCat, Library of Congress, UPenn Online Books, Open Library

Participation

Education


Course

OER Commons: Open Educational Resources

Community

News

Phys.org, NPR Archives

Book

ISBNdb

Government

Document

USA.gov

Expression

Fun

Note: This is a 360° Video — press and hold to explore it!

Arts

Poem

OEDILF: The Omnificent English Dictionary In Limerick Form

Music

Song Lyrics

returntotop

More…

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories Phys.org internet news portal provides the latest news on science including: Physics, Nanotechnology, Life Sciences, Space Science, Earth Science, Environment, Health and Medicine.

  • Boeing acknowledges flaw in 737 MAX simulator...
    on May 20, 2019 at 2:11 pm

    Boeing acknowledged Saturday it had to correct flaws in its 737 MAX flight simulator software used to train pilots, after two deadly crashes involving the aircraft that killed 346 people. […]

  • Traumatised by conflict, animals find haven in...
    on May 20, 2019 at 6:04 am

    For more than a year after being moved to a Jordanian wildlife reserve from war-hit Syria, two bears, Loz and Sukkar, would cower whenever planes flew by, traumatised by past bombardments. […]

  • Boeing finishes software update for grounded...
    on May 16, 2019 at 8:49 pm

    Boeing says it has finished with its updates to the flight-control software implicated in two deadly crashes involving its 737 Max, moving a step closer to getting the plane back in the sky. […]

  • Why parents should think twice about tracking...
    on May 16, 2019 at 2:50 pm

    The use of self-tracking and personal surveillance technologies has grown considerably over the last decade. There are now apps to monitor people's movement, health, mindfulness, sleep, eating habits and even sexual activity. […]

  • FAA chief defends handling of Boeing Max safety...
    on May 15, 2019 at 7:08 pm

    The acting head of the Federal Aviation Administration said Wednesday that Boeing should have done more to explain an automated flight-control system on its 737 Max aircraft before two deadly crashes, but he defended his agency's safety certification of the plane and its decision not to ground the jet until other regulators around the world had already done so. […]