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monkey : a nonhuman primate mammal with the exception usually of the lemurs and tarsiers; especially : any of the smaller longer-tailed catarrhine or platyrrhine primates as contrasted with the apes — Webster

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Monkeys are haplorhine (“dry-nosed”) primates, a group generally possessing tails and consisting of about 260 known living species. There are two distinct lineages of monkeys: New World Monkeys and catarrhines. Apes emerged within the catarrhines with the Old World monkeys as a sister group, so cladistically they are monkeys as well. However, traditionally apes are not considered monkeys, rendering this grouping paraphyletic. The equivalent monophyletic clade are the simians. Many monkey species are tree-dwelling (arboreal), although there are species that live primarily on the ground, such as baboons. Most species are also active during the day (diurnal). Monkeys are generally considered to be intelligent, particularly Old World monkeys. — Wikipedia

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Monkeys News -- ScienceDaily Monkeys in the news. From squirrel monkeys to baboons, read all the latest research about monkeys.

  • Researchers reconstruct spoken words as processed...
    on December 13, 2019 at 4:54 pm

    Using a brain-computer interface, a team of researchers has reconstructed English words from the brain activity of rhesus macaques that listened as the words were spoken.

  • How humans learned to dance: From the chimpanzee...
    on December 12, 2019 at 3:46 pm

    Two chimpanzees housed in a zoo in the US have sparked the question about how human dance evolved after being observed performing a duo dance-like behavior, similar to a human conga line.

  • Monkeys inform group members about threats --...
    on December 2, 2019 at 3:58 pm

    Humans are often faced with the choice of investing in the greater good or being selfish and letting others do the work. Animals that live in groups often encounter threats, and informing others could potentially save lives. Researchers show that wild sooty mangabeys, when facing dangerous vipers, do not just call out of fear or to warn their family, but will call when the information about the threat might otherwise not reach all group members.

  • A monkey's balancing act
    on November 25, 2019 at 5:09 pm

    Endangered monkeys living in the wild are intelligently adapting their lifestyle to fit with their human neighbors, learning to avoid manmade risks and exploiting increased contact with people, new research has revealed.

  • Wound healing in mucous tissues could ward off...
    on November 22, 2019 at 4:32 pm

    Wound healing in mucous tissues during early infection by Simian Immunodeficiency Virus guards some primate species against developing AIDS. Both HIV and SIV provoke an immune response that injures tissues surrounding the intestine; African green monkeys with SIV quickly repair their mucous tissues. This interrupts the disease course and avoids AIDS onset. Stimulating this response might be a way of treating HIV in people.


Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories Phys.org internet news portal provides the latest news on science including: Physics, Nanotechnology, Life Sciences, Space Science, Earth Science, Environment, Health and Medicine.