Octopus

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Giant Pacific Otopus (National Geographic)

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Invertebrate Cuttlefish, Octopus, Ant, Bee, Butterfly, Spider, Lobster
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Resources

These are organized by a classification scheme developed exclusively for Cosma. More…

General

Portal

The Octopus News Magazine Online

Dictionary

octopus : any of a genus (Octopus) of cephalopod mollusks that have eight muscular arms equipped with two rows of suckers; broadly : any octopod excepting the paper nautilus — Webster

octopuses or octopi (Merriam-Webster)
OneLook, Free Dictionary, Wiktionary, Urban Dictionary

Thesaurus

Roget’s II (Thesaurus.com), Merriam-Webster Thesaurus, Visuwords

Encyclopedia

Octopus is a soft-bodied, eight-armed mollusc of the order Octopoda. Around 300 species are recognized and the order is grouped within the class Cephalopoda with squids, cuttlefish and nautiloids. Like other cephalopods, the octopus is bilaterally symmetric with two eyes and a beak, with its mouth at the centre point of the arms (which are sometimes mistakenly called “tentacles”). The soft body can rapidly alter its shape, enabling octopuses to squeeze through small gaps. They trail their eight arms behind them as they swim. The siphon is used both for respiration and for locomotion, by expelling a jet of water. Octopuses have a complex nervous system and excellent sight, and are among the most intelligent and behaviorally diverse of all invertebrates. — Wikipedia

Encyclopædia Britannica

Introduction





Octopus Facts (Alina Bradford, Live Science)
Ten Curious Facts About Octopuses (Rachel Nuwer, Smithsonian.com)
Octopus Facts (Alina Bradford, Live Science)

Search

WolframAlpha

Science




On Ecstasy, Octopuses Reached Out for a Hug (JoAnna Klein, New York Times)

Preservation

History

Fossil Octopuses (The Octopus News Magazine Online)

Library

WorldCat, Library of Congress, UPenn Online Books, Open Library

Participation

Education





Why the octopus brain is so extraordinary (Cláudio L. Guerra, TED-Ed)

Octopus and Squid (Biology4Kids)

Course

OER Commons: Open Educational Resources

News

The Octopus News Magazine Online, Phys.org, NPR Archives

Book

ISBNdb

Government

Document

USA.gov

Expression


Fun


Humor

A Brief History Of Octopi Taking Over The World (Kelsey D. Atherton, Popular Science)
Octopus Jokes (Worst Jokes Ever)

Poem

OEDILF: The Omnificent English Dictionary In Limerick Form

Music

Song Lyrics

Folklore

Giant Squid & Octopus: History and Evidence (Anomalies)
4 Cephalopods from Myth and Folklore: Celebrating World Octopus (Kattyayani’s Blog)

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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories Phys.org internet news portal provides the latest news on science including: Physics, Nanotechnology, Life Sciences, Space Science, Earth Science, Environment, Health and Medicine.

  • This cuttlefish is flamboyant on special...
    on August 20, 2020 at 7:58 am

    The flashy Flamboyant Cuttlefish is among the most famous of the cephalopods (octopus, squid, and cuttlefish)—but it is widely misunderstood by its legions of fans.

  • Fossilised 429-mln-year-old eye mirrors modern...
    on August 13, 2020 at 3:00 pm

    An exquisitely well preserved 429-million-year-old eye from a marine creature that went extinct before dinosaurs even existed had vision comparable to modern-day bees and dragonflies, researchers said Thursday.

  • Selfish genes take sides in the battle of the...
    on August 12, 2020 at 1:06 pm

    Men may have a surprising genetic advantage over women, according to new research carried out at the University of St Andrews.

  • Seal-eating killer whales accumulate large...
    on August 6, 2020 at 4:40 pm

    Research of killer whales in the southern Atlantic ocean and Mediterranean have shown that their blubber contains high levels of pollutants called PCBs, whilst killer whales found along the Norwegian coast have been assumed to be healthy and at low risk from pollution. This is because when researchers took samples from nine Norwegian killer whales in 2002, they found lower levels of pollutants than other populations.

  • First gene knockout in cephalopod achieved
    on July 30, 2020 at 3:00 pm

    A team at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) has achieved the first gene knockout in a cephalopod using the squid Doryteuthis pealeii, an exceptionally important research organism in biology for nearly a century. The milestone study, led by MBL Senior Scientist Joshua Rosenthal and MBL Whitman Scientist Karen Crawford, is reported in the July 30 issue of Current Biology.