Planet X

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Spotlight


Is there a mysterious Planet Nine lurking in our solar system beyond Neptune? (Charlie Wood, Washington Post)
The Super Earth that Came Home for Dinner (NASA/JPL)

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Pages

Physical Realm
Universe Astronomical Instrument
Galaxy Milky Way, Andromeda
Planetary System Star, Brown Dwarf, Planet, Moon

Solar System Sun
Terrestrial Planet Mercury, Venus, Earth (Moon), Mars
Asteroid Belt Ceres, Vesta
Jovian Planet Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune
Trans-Neptunian Object
Kuiper Belt Pluto, Haumea, Makemake
Scattered Disc Eris, Sedna, Planet X
Oort Cloud Etc. Scholz’s Star
Small Body Comet, Centaur, Asteroid

Resources

These are organized by a classification scheme developed exclusively for Cosma. More…

General

Portal

Solar System Exploration: Hypothetical Planet X (NASA)

Encyclopedia

In 1894, with the help of William Pickering, Percival Lowell, a wealthy Bostonian, founded the Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Arizona. In 1906, convinced he could resolve the conundrum of Uranus’s orbit, he began an extensive project to search for a planet beyond Neptune, which he named Planet X, a name previously used by Gabriel Dallet. The X in the name represents an unknown and is pronounced as the letter, as opposed to the Roman numeral for 10 (at the time, and now, Planet X would be the ninth planet). — Wikipedia

Science





Caltech Researchers Find Evidence of a Real Ninth Planet (Caltech)
Solar Obliquity Induced by Planet Nine (Elizabeth Bailey, Konstantin Batygin, Michael E. Brown, arXiv.org)

Hypothesis




Library

WorldCat, Library of Congress, UPenn Online Books, Open Library

Community

Organization

International Astronomical Union (IAU)
Minor Planet Center (International Astronomical Union)

News

Phys.org, NPR Archives

Book

ISBNdb

Government

Document

USA.gov

returntotop

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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories Phys.org internet news portal provides the latest news on science including: Physics, Nanotechnology, Life Sciences, Space Science, Earth Science, Environment, Health and Medicine.

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