Polar Regions

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Polar Photographer Shares His View Of A Ferocious But Fragile Ecosystem (Terry Gross, NPR)

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World Afro-Eurasia, America, Oceania, Polar Regions

Sphere Land, Ice, Water (Ocean), Air, Life (Cell, Gene, Microscope)
Ecosystem Forest, Grassland, Desert, Arctic, Aquatic
Tree of Life Whale, Walrus, Seal, Polar Bear

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Arctic, Antarctica

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These are organized by a classification scheme developed exclusively for Cosma. More…

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polar : (a) of or relating to a geographic pole or the region around it (b) coming from or having the characteristics of such a region — Webster

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Polar regions of Earth also known as Earth’s frigid zones, are the regions of Earth surrounding its geographical poles (the North and South Poles). These regions are dominated by Earth’s polar ice caps, the northern resting on the Arctic Ocean and the southern on the continent of Antarctica. — Wikipedia

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Polar Exploration (Wikipedia)

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The Arctic vs. the Antarctic (Camille Seaman, TED Ed)

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The Future of the Poles (Scientific America)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories Phys.org internet news portal provides the latest news on science including: Physics, Nanotechnology, Life Sciences, Space Science, Earth Science, Environment, Health and Medicine.

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