Polar Bear

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polar bear : a large creamy-white carnivorous bear (Ursus maritimus synonym Thalarctos maritimus) that inhabits arctic regions — Webster

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Polar bear (Ursus maritimus) is a hypercarnivorous bear whose native range lies largely within the Arctic Circle, encompassing the Arctic Ocean, its surrounding seas and surrounding land masses. It is a large bear, approximately the same size as the omnivorous Kodiak bear (Ursus arctos middendorffi). A boar (adult male) weighs around 350–700 kg (772–1,543 lb), while a sow (adult female) is about half that size. Although it is the sister species of the brown bear, it has evolved to occupy a narrower ecological niche, with many body characteristics adapted for cold temperatures, for moving across snow, ice and open water, and for hunting seals, which make up most of its diet. Although most polar bears are born on land, they spend most of their time on the sea ice. Their scientific name means “maritime bear” and derives from this fact. Polar bears hunt their preferred food of seals from the edge of sea ice, often living off fat reserves when no sea ice is present. Because of their dependence on the sea ice, polar bears are classified as marine mammals — Wikipedia

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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories Phys.org internet news portal provides the latest news on science including: Physics, Nanotechnology, Life Sciences, Space Science, Earth Science, Environment, Health and Medicine.

  • Why polar bears at sea have higher pollution...
    on December 11, 2019 at 1:00 pm

    As the climate changes, myriad animal populations are being impacted. In particular, Arctic sea-ice is in decline, causing polar bears in the Barents Sea region to alter their feeding and hunting habits. Bears that follow sea-ice to offshore areas have higher pollutant levels than those staying on land—but why? A new study in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology reports the likely reasons.

  • Weak Arctic ice sees 56 polar bears descend on...
    on December 6, 2019 at 11:33 am

    More than 50 polar bears have gathered on the edge of a village in Russia's far north, environmentalists and residents said, as weak Arctic ice leaves them unable to roam.

  • A solution for cleaning up PFAS, one of the...
    on December 5, 2019 at 6:18 pm

    A cluster of industrial chemicals known by the shorthand term "PFAS" has infiltrated the far reaches of our planet with significance that scientists are only beginning to understand.

  • Svalbard reindeer populations rebounding from...
    on November 29, 2019 at 2:57 pm

    As reindeer go, the animals living on the Norwegian arctic archipelago of Svalbard might not be Santa's first choice. They're a smaller subspecies of their common mainland relatives, and to save energy they basically never run. But because they were nearly exterminated from Svalbard around 1900—and were then protected in 1925—the animals provide unique insights into how conservation can help species thrive.

  • Space is key to monitoring ocean acidification
    on November 29, 2019 at 11:58 am

    This week, the UN World Meteorological Organization announced that concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere have reached yet another high. This ongoing trend is not only heating up the planet, but also affecting the chemical composition of our oceans. Until recently, it has been difficult to monitor 'ocean acidification', but scientists are exploring new ways to combine information from different sources, including from ESA's SMOS mission, to shed new light on this major […]