Solar System

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Solar Extremes

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Solar Extremes SL

Related

Pages

Physical Realm
Universe Astronomical Instrument
Galaxy Milky Way, Andromeda
Planetary System Star, Brown Dwarf, Planet, Moon

Solar System Sun
Terrestrial Planet Mercury, Venus, Earth (Moon), Mars
Asteroid Belt Ceres, Vesta
Jovian Planet Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune
Trans-Neptunian Object
Kuiper Belt Pluto, Haumea, Makemake
Scattered Disc Eris, Sedna, Planet X
Oort Cloud Etc. Scholz’s Star
Small Body Comet, Centaur, Asteroid

Spotlight

Resources

These are organized by a classification scheme developed exclusively for Cosma. More…

General

Portal

Solar System and Beyond (NASA)
Solar System Exploration (NASA)
Solar System Simulator : View Anyplace from Anyplace (NASA, JPL)
Astrogeology Science Center (USGS)

Our Sun & Solar System Internet Resources (Library of Congress)
Solar System Portal (Wikipedia)

Dictionary

Solar System : the sun together with the group of celestial bodies that are held by its attraction and revolve around it; also : a similar system centered on another star — Webster

OneLook, Free Dictionary, Wiktionary, Urban Dictionary

Encyclopedia

Solar System is the gravitationally bound system comprising the Sun and the objects that orbit it, either directly or indirectly. Of those objects that orbit the Sun directly, the largest eight are the planets, with the remainder being significantly smaller objects, such as dwarf planets and small Solar System bodies. Of the objects that orbit the Sun indirectly, the moons, two are larger than the smallest planet, Mercury.

The Solar System formed 4.6 billion years ago from the gravitational collapse of a giant interstellar molecular cloud. The vast majority of the system’s mass is in the Sun, with most of the remaining mass contained in Jupiter. The four smaller inner planets, Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars, are terrestrial planets, being primarily composed of rock and metal. The four outer planets are giant planets, being substantially more massive than the terrestrials. The two largest, Jupiter and Saturn, are gas giants, being composed mainly of hydrogen and helium; the two outermost planets, Uranus and Neptune, are ice giants, being composed mostly of substances with relatively high melting points compared with hydrogen and helium, called volatiles, such as water, ammonia and methane. All planets have almost circular orbits that lie within a nearly flat disc called the ecliptic. — Wikipedia

Solar System (Eric Weisstein’s World of Astronomy, Wolfram Research)
Planets (Eric Weisstein’s World of Astronomy, Wolfram Research)
David Darling’s Internet Encyclopedia of Science, Encyclopædia Britannica
Encyclopedia of the Solar System

Introduction

A Traveler’s Guide to the Planets (National Geographic Channel)

Note: These are 360° Videos — press and hold to explore!

Search

Solar System (Wolfram Alpha)
Planets (Wolfram Alpha)

Science

Weight on Other Planets (Online Conversion.com)

The Planets We Don’t Have (Adam Frank, NPR)

Note: This is a 360° Video — press and hold to explore it!

Preservation

History

Almagest (Wikipedia)
Ptolemy (Wikipedia)

Orrery (Wikipedia)

Solar System Exploration at 50 (NASA)

Library

WorldCat, Library of Congress, UPenn Online Books, Open Library

Participation

Education

Solar System (Space Place, NASA)
Solar System Explorer (Space Place, NASA)
NASA Virtual Field Trip: Solar System Math
Our Solar System (Ask an Astronomer, Cornell University)
The Nine Planets Solar System Tour
Solar System (Cosmos4Kids)
Solar System, More than Planets (Cosmos4Kids)
Solar System II| Exploration (Cosmos4Kids)

Course

Crash Course Astronomy (YouTube)

OER Commons: Open Educational Resources

Community

Organization

The Planetary Society

News

Science Daily, NPR Archives

Book

ISBNdb

Government

Solar System Exploration, planets (NASA)
Eyes on the Solar System (JPL/NASA)

Document

USA.gov

Expression

Fun

Poem

OEDILF: The Omnificent English Dictionary In Limerick Form

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Solar System News -- ScienceDaily Solar System Planets. Astronomy articles on the eight planets, plus the two dwarf planets, Pluto and Eris. Great pictures of everything in the solar system. Updated daily.

  • Baked meteorites yield clues to planetary...
    on April 15, 2021 at 3:41 pm

    In a novel laboratory investigation of the initial atmospheres of Earth-like rocky planets, researchers heated pristine meteorite samples in a high-temperature furnace and analyzed the gases released. Their results suggest that the initial atmospheres of terrestrial planets may differ significantly from many of the common assumptions used in theoretical models of planetary atmospheres.

  • New research reveals secret to Jupiter's curious...
    on April 10, 2021 at 2:49 pm

    Jupiter's polar cap is threaded in part with closed magnetic field lines rather than entirely with open magnetic field lines, new research finds.

  • Caught speeding: Clocking the fastest-spinning...
    on April 8, 2021 at 7:23 pm

    Astronomers have discovered the most rapidly rotating brown dwarfs known. They found three brown dwarfs that each complete a full rotation roughly once every hour. That rate is so extreme that if these 'failed stars' rotated any faster, they could come close to tearing themselves apart. Identified by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, the brown dwarfs were then studied by ground-based telescopes including Gemini North, which confirmed their surprisingly speedy rotation.

  • Curiosity rover explores stratigraphy of Gale...
    on April 8, 2021 at 7:22 pm

    Gale Crater's central sedimentary mound (Aeolis Mons or, informally, Mount Sharp) is a 5.5-km-tall remnant of the infilling and erosion of this ancient impact crater. Given its thickness and age, Mount Sharp preserves one of the best records of early Martian climatic, hydrological, and sedimentary history.

  • More than 5,000 tons of extraterrestrial dust...
    on April 8, 2021 at 5:15 pm

    Every year, our planet encounters dust from comets and asteroids. These interplanetary dust particles pass through our atmosphere and give rise to shooting stars. Some of them reach the ground in the form of micrometeorites. An international program conducted for nearly 20 has determined that 5,200 tons per year of these micrometeorites reach the ground.

  • Mars didn't dry up in one go
    on April 8, 2021 at 5:14 pm

    A research team has discovered that the Martian climate alternated between dry and wetter periods, before drying up completely about 3 billion years ago.

  • First X-rays from Uranus discovered
    on March 31, 2021 at 5:09 pm

    Astronomers have detected X-rays from Uranus using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. This result may help scientists learn more about this enigmatic ice giant planet in our solar system.

  • Researchers discover new type of ancient crater...
    on March 30, 2021 at 4:13 pm

    An ancient crater lake in the southern highlands of Mars appears to have been fed by glacial runoff, bolstering the idea that the Red Planet had a cold and icy past.

  • Scientists discover a new auroral feature on...
    on March 29, 2021 at 1:48 pm

    Astronomers have detected new faint aurora features, characterized by ring-like emissions, which expand rapidly over time. Scientists determined that charged particles coming from the edge of Jupiter's massive magnetosphere triggered these auroral emissions.

  • Ocean currents predicted on Saturn's moon...
    on March 25, 2021 at 11:02 pm

    New research could inform where to one day search for signs of life on Saturn's moon Enceladus.