Spider

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General

Portal

Spiders (Harvard Subject Guides)

Dictionary

spider : any of an order (Araneae synonym Araneida) of arachnids having a short, usually unsegmented abdomen linked to the cephalothorax by the pedicel, chelicerae modified into poison fangs, and two or more pairs of spinnerets at the posterior end of the abdomen for spinning threads of silk for various uses (as in making cocoons for their eggs or webs to catch prey) — Webster

OneLook, Free Dictionary, Wiktionary, Urban Dictionary

Thesaurus

Roget’s II (Thesaurus.com), Merriam-Webster Thesaurus, Visuwords

Glossary

Spider Glossary (Spiders from Europe, Australia and some immunology)

Encyclopedia

Spiders are air-breathing arthropods that have eight legs and chelicerae with fangs that inject venom. They are the largest order of arachnids and rank seventh in total species diversity among all other orders of organisms. Spiders are found worldwide on every continent except for Antarctica, and have become established in nearly every habitat with the exceptions of air and sea colonization. — Wikipedia

Encyclopædia Britannica

Introduction


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WolframAlpha

Science

Arachnology is the scientific study of spiders and related animals such as scorpions, pseudoscorpions, and harvestmen, collectively called arachnids. Those who study spiders and other arachnids are arachnologists. — Wikipedia


Preservation

Museum



Orb-Weavers: Web Masters of the Spider World (Harvard Museum of Natural History)

Library

WorldCat, Library of Congress, UPenn Online Books, Open Library

Participation

Education


Under the spell of spiders (Smithsonian)
Spiders and Scorpions (Biology4Kids)

Course

OER Commons: Open Educational Resources

Community

Occupation

How to become an Arachnologist (Chris Buddle, Arthropod Ecology)

News

Arachnology (British Arachnological Society), Science Daily, Phys.org, NPR Archives

Book

ISBNdb

Government

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USA.gov

Expression


Fun





Lucas the Spider (YouTube Channel)

Humor


Poem

OEDILF: The Omnificent English Dictionary In Limerick Form

Music

Song Lyrics

Fiction

Spiders in literature (Wikipedia)

Folklore

Spider Mythology and Folklore (Patti Wigington, ThoughtCo)
Spiders in folklore and mythology (Wikipedia)

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Spiders and Ticks News -- ScienceDaily Spiders, scorpions and ticks in the news. Learn why a spider hanging from a thread does not rotate, how spiders find a mate and how ticks carry Lyme Disease. Read about spider silk and spider webs.

  • Tapping secrets of Aussie spider's unique silk
    on October 19, 2020 at 12:28 pm

    The basket-web spider, which is found only in Australia, has revealed it not only weaves a unique lobster pot web but that its silk has elasticity and a gluing substance, that creates a high degree of robustness.

  • Scientists discover why tarantulas come in vivid...
    on September 24, 2020 at 2:19 pm

    Researchers find support for new hypotheses: that tarantulas' vibrant blue colors may be used to communicate between potential mates, while green coloration confers the ability to conceal among foliage. Their research also suggests that tarantulas are not as color-blind as previously believed, and that these arachnids may be able to perceive the bright blue tones on their bodies.

  • Toxic masculinity: Why male funnel web spiders...
    on September 21, 2020 at 7:13 pm

    A team of researchers has revealed why male funnel web spiders develop much deadlier venom than their female counterparts. The team has spent 20 years investigating delta-hexatoxins, the venom peptides that make funnel web spider venom so dangerous.

  • Giant spider provides promise of pain relief for...
    on September 21, 2020 at 2:03 pm

    Molecules from the venom of one of the world's largest spiders could help researchers tailor pain blockers for people with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

  • A new species of spider
    on September 16, 2020 at 5:10 pm

    During a research stay in the highlands of Colombia conducted as part of her doctorate, a PhD student has discovered and zoologically described a new species of spider.


Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories Phys.org internet news portal provides the latest news on science including: Physics, Nanotechnology, Life Sciences, Space Science, Earth Science, Environment, Health and Medicine.

  • Tapping secrets of Aussie spider's unique silk
    on October 19, 2020 at 9:00 am

    An international collaboration has provided the first insights into a new type of silk produced by the very unusual Australian basket-web spider, which uses it to build a lobster pot web that protects its eggs and trap prey.

  • A new species of Darwin wasp from Mexico named in...
    on October 8, 2020 at 3:11 pm

    Scientists at the Autonomous University of Tamaulipas (UAT) in Mexico recently discovered five new species of parasitoid wasps in Mexico, but the name of one of them sounds a bit weird: covida. Why this name?

  • Video: One cell eating another
    on October 8, 2020 at 12:30 pm

    Watch as these two microscopic, single-celled protozoans (protists), battle it out, resulting in one eating the other. These organisms inhabit almost any body of still water (ponds, lakes, reservoirs) and the oceans, and are the most important consumers of bacteria in the world.

  • Hunger encourages risk-taking
    on October 5, 2020 at 4:30 pm

    The lives of animals in the wild are full of risky situations with uncertain outcomes. Whether they are exploring new habitats in unfamiliar terrain or searching for new food sources, they run the risk of being caught and killed by a predator. In many instances, their very survival depends on a single decision. Whether an animal decides to take a risk or prefers to avoid danger varies greatly from one individual to another.

  • Venom glands similar to those of snakes are found...
    on October 1, 2020 at 7:32 pm

    A group led by researchers at Butantan Institute in Brazil and supported by FAPESP has described for the first time the presence of venom glands in the mouth of an amphibian. The legless animal is a caecilian and lives underground. It has tooth-related glands that, when compressed during biting, release a secretion into its prey—earthworms, insect larvae, small amphibians and snakes, and even rodent pups. A paper reporting the study is published in iScience.