Tortoise

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tortoise : any of a family (Testudinidae) of terrestrial turtles — Webster

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Tortoises are a family, Testudinidae. Testudinidae is a Family under the order Testudines and suborder Cryptodira. There are fourteen extant families of the order Testudines, an order of reptile commonly known as turtles, tortoises, and terrapins. The suborder Cryptodira is a suborder of Testudines that includes most living tortoises and turtles. Cryptodira differ from Pluerodia in that they lower their necks and pull the heads straight back into the shells, instead of folding their necks sideways along the body under the shells’ marginals. The testudines are some of the most ancient reptiles alive. Tortoises are shielded from predators by a shell. The top part of the shell is the carapace, the underside is the plastron, and the two are connected by the bridge.

The carapace is fused to both the vertebrae and ribcage, and tortoises are unique among vertebrates in that the pectoral and pelvic girdles are inside the ribcage rather than outside. Tortoises can vary in dimension from a few centimeters to two meters. They are usually diurnal animals with tendencies to be crepuscular depending on the ambient temperatures. They are generally reclusive animals. Tortoises are the longest living land animal in the world, although the longest living species of tortoise is a matter of debate. Galápagos tortoises are noted to live over 150 years, but an Aldabra giant tortoise named Adwaita may have been the longest living at an estimated 255 years. In general, most tortoise species can live 80–150 years. — Wikipedia

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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories Phys.org internet news portal provides the latest news on science including: Physics, Nanotechnology, Life Sciences, Space Science, Earth Science, Environment, Health and Medicine.

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    on September 29, 2020 at 3:00 pm

    More than a third of reptile species are bought and sold online in often-unregulated international trade, researchers said Tuesday, warning of the impact on wild populations of a pet market that puts a bounty on rare and newly discovered animals.

  • Tortoise hatchlings found to orient toward...
    on September 15, 2020 at 1:22 pm

    A trio of researchers, one with the University of London, the other two with the University of Trento, has found that freshly hatched tortoises tend to orient themselves toward objects that resemble a face. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Elisabetta Versace, Silvia Damini and Gionata Stancher describe experiments they conducted with tortoise hatchlings and what they learned about them.

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    In Southeast Asia, wildlife trade is running rampant, and Vietnam plays a key role in combating wildlife trafficking.

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    Animals in tropical and Mediterranean areas are the most sensitive to climate change and land use pressures, finds a new study by UCL researchers.

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    on September 10, 2020 at 3:00 pm

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