Wolf

Cosma Home > Communication > Knowledge > Realm > Terrestrial > Sphere > Life > Animal > Wolf

Spotlight

Note: These are 360° videos — press and hold to explore them!



Related

Pages

Terrestrial (Earth)
Sphere Land, Ice, Water (Ocean), Air, Life (Cell, Gene, Microscope)
Ecosystem Forest, Grassland, Desert, Arctic, Aquatic

Tree of Life
Microorganism
Plant Flower, Tree
Animal
Invertebrate Octopus, Ant, Bee, Butterfly, Spider, Lobster
Vertebrate Fish, Seahorse, Ray, Shark, Frog, Turtle, Tortoise, Dinosaur
Bird, Ostrich, Owl, Crow, Parrot
Mammal Bat, Rabbit, Giraffe, Camel, Horse, Elephant, Mammoth
Whale, Dolphin, Walrus, Seal, Polar Bear, Bear, Cat, Tiger, Lion, Dog, Wolf
Monkey, Chimpanzee, Human

Resources

These are organized by a classification scheme developed exclusively for Cosma. More…

General

Portal

International Wolf Center, Gray Wolf (Defenders.org)

Dictionary

wolf : any of several large predatory canids (genus Canis) that are active mostly at night, live and hunt in packs, and resemble the related dogs — Webster

gray wolf : a large, broad-headed, wide-muzzled wolf (Canis lupus) that has a dense, heavy coat of usually light brown or brownish gray interspersed with black above and yellowish white below and that was formerly widely distributed throughout North America and Eurasia but is now greatly restricted to the more northerly parts of its range — Webster

OneLook, Free Dictionary, Wiktionary, Urban Dictionary

Encyclopedia

Wolf (Canis lupus), also known as the gray wolf, timber wolf, western wolf, and its other subspecies is a canine native to the wilderness and remote areas of Eurasia and North America. It is the largest extant member of its family, with males averaging 43–45 kg (95–99 lb) and females 36–38.5 kg (79–85 lb). Like the red wolf, it is distinguished from other Canis species by its larger size and less pointed features, particularly on the ears and muzzle. Its winter fur is long and bushy and predominantly a mottled gray in color, although nearly pure white, red, and brown to black also occur. — Wikipedia

Encyclopædia Britannica

Search

WolframAlpha

Preservation

Library

WorldCat, Library of Congress, UPenn Online Books, Open Library

Participation

Education


Course

OER Commons: Open Educational Resources

Community

News

Phys.org, NPR Archives

Book

ISBNdb

Government

Document

USA.gov

Expression

Arts

Poem

OEDILF: The Omnificent English Dictionary In Limerick Form

Music

Song Lyrics

returntotop

More…

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories Phys.org internet news portal provides the latest news on science including: Physics, Nanotechnology, Life Sciences, Space Science, Earth Science, Environment, Health and Medicine.

  • Do raccoons fear coyotes?
    on September 29, 2020 at 2:00 pm

    A new study in North Carolina caught raccoons on camera foraging with other animals including deer, foxes and flying squirrels and even coyotes. The raccoons' lack of worry about the threat of predation supported researchers' conclusion that raccoons are unlikely prey for coyotes.

  • 'Virtue signalling,' a slur meant to imply moral...
    on September 29, 2020 at 1:50 pm

    Last month, on the centennial of the 19th amendment granting American women the vote, US President Donald Trump announced he would issue a posthumous pardon for Susan B. Anthony. A suffragette, Anthony was convicted of voting illegally as a woman in 1872. The response was mixed. Some applauded the president, others accused him of virtue signaling.

  • A 'cancer shredder' substance with new mechanism...
    on September 29, 2020 at 1:45 pm

    The villain in this drama has a pretty name: Aurora—Latin for dawn. In the world of biochemistry, however, Aurora (more precisely: Aurora-A kinase) stands for a protein that causes extensive damage. It has been known for a long time that Aurora often causes cancer. It triggers the development of leukemias and many pediatric cancers, such as neuroblastomas.

  • Wolves have been caring for the pack for at least...
    on September 25, 2020 at 12:08 pm

    Wolves today live and hunt in packs, which helps them take down large prey. But when did this group behavior evolve? An international research team has reported specimens of an ancestral wolf, Canis chihliensis, from the Ice Age of north China (~1.3 million years ago), with debilitating injuries to the jaws and leg. The wolf survived these injuries long enough to heal, supporting the likelihood of food-sharing and family care in this early canine.

  • Camera traps show impact of recreational activity...
    on September 24, 2020 at 2:45 pm

    The COVID-19 pandemic has fired up interest in outdoor activities in our parks and forests. Now a new UBC study highlights the need to be mindful of how these activities may affect wildlife living in protected areas.