Bubbles

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General

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Soap Bubble Wiki
Bubblemancy

Dictionary

soap bubble : a hollow iridescent globe formed by blowing a film of soapsuds (as from a pipe) — Webster

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Thesaurus

Roget’s II (Thesaurus.com), Merriam-Webster Thesaurus, Visuwords

Encyclopedia

Soap bubble is an extremely thin film of soapy water enclosing air that forms a hollow sphere with an iridescent surface. Soap bubbles usually last for only a few seconds before bursting, either on their own or on contact with another object. They are often used for children’s enjoyment, but they are also used in artistic performances. Assembling several bubbles results in foam. When light shines onto a bubble it appears to change color. Unlike those seen in a rainbow, which arise from differential refraction, the colors seen in a soap bubble arise from interference of light reflecting off the front and back surfaces of the thin soap film. Depending on the thickness of the film, different colors interfere constructively and destructively. — Wikipedia

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WolframAlpha

Science





Physicists determine the optimal soap recipe for blowing gigantic bubbles (Jennifer Ouellette)
Physics of Giant Soap Bubbles (Emory University)
How to make a giant bubble (Stephen Frazier, Xinyi Jiang, and Justin C. Burton, Physical Review Fluids)

Technology


Preservation

History

A small history of soap bubbles (PUSTEFIX)

Museum

Bubbles (National Toy Hall of Fame, The Strong National Museum of Play)
Bubbles (Ron Hipschman, Exploratorium)

Library

WorldCat, Library of Congress, UPenn Online Books, Open Library

Participation

Education




Course



The Science of Soap Bubbles (MIT BLOSSOMS)

OER Commons: Open Educational Resources

News

Soap Bubble (Science Daily), Phys.org

Book

ISBNdb

Government

Document

USA.gov

Expression

Note: This is a 360° video — press and hold to explore it!

Fun




Toy

Amazon Toys

Arts

Performing Arts



Bubbleoogy (Keith Johnson, YouTube Channel)

The Lord of the Bubbles: Top World Class Bubble Shows

Visual Arts



Richard Heeks flickr

Poem

OEDILF: The Omnificent English Dictionary In Limerick Form

returntotop

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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories Phys.org internet news portal provides the latest news on science including: Physics, Nanotechnology, Life Sciences, Space Science, Earth Science, Environment, Health and Medicine.

  • Physics of giant bubbles bursts secret of fluid...
    on January 30, 2020 at 5:43 pm

    A study inspired by street performers making gigantic soap bubbles led to a discovery in fluid mechanics: Mixing different molecular sizes of polymers within a solution increases the ability of a thin film to stretch without breaking.

  • Hummingbirds' rainbow colors come from...
    on January 10, 2020 at 4:00 pm

    Hummingbirds are some of the most brightly-colored things in the entire world. Their feathers are iridescent— light bounces off them like a soap bubble, resulting in shimmering hues that shift as you look at them from different angles. While other birds like ducks can have bright feathers, nothing seems to come close to hummingbirds, and scientists weren't sure why. But a new study in Evolution shows that while hummingbird feathers have the same basic makeup as other birds', the special […]

  • Foam offers way to manipulate light
    on November 18, 2019 at 1:54 pm

    There is more to foam than meets the eye. Literally. A study by Princeton scientists has shown that a type of foam long studied by scientists is able to block particular wavelengths of light, a coveted property for next-generation information technology that uses light instead of electricity.

  • Proving a longstanding conjecture about the area...
    on November 8, 2019 at 1:44 pm

    Johns Hopkins mathematician Joel Spruck and a colleague recently succeeded in proving a longstanding conjecture about the area of negatively curved spaces, such as flower petals or coral reefs, a yearslong endeavor full unexpected hurdles and sleepless nights.

  • Size matters: How cells pack in epithelial tissues
    on September 5, 2019 at 4:00 pm

    Small-cell clones in proliferating epithelia—tissues that line all body surfaces—organize very differently than their normal-sized counterparts, according to a recent study from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research. Published online September 5, 2019, in Developmental Cell, these findings from the laboratory of Matthew Gibson, Ph.D., may contribute to a better understanding of how some human diseases progress.

  • Scientists explore aged paint in microscopic...
    on August 29, 2019 at 5:03 pm

    Watching paint dry may seem like a boring hobby, but understanding what happens after the paint dries can be key in preserving precious works of art.

  • Order from chaos: Australian vortex studies are...
    on June 27, 2019 at 7:00 pm

    Two Australian studies published this week offer the first proof of a 70-year-old theory of turbulence.

  • How to bend waves to arrive at the right place
    on June 24, 2019 at 2:30 pm

    Waves do not always spread uniformly into all directions, but can form a remarkable "branched flow." At TU Wien (Vienna) a method has now been developed to control this phenomenon.

  • Freezing bubbles viral video inspired research...
    on June 19, 2019 at 5:14 pm

    Scientific inquiry often begins with the "why."

  • Researchers solve mystery of how gas bubbles form...
    on June 17, 2019 at 8:00 pm

    The formation of air bubbles in a liquid appears very similar to its inverse process, the formation of liquid droplets from, say, a dripping water faucet. But the physics involved is actually quite different, and while those water droplets are uniform in their size and spacing, bubble formation is typically a much more random process.