Bubbles

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General

Portal

Soap Bubble Wiki
Bubblemancy

Dictionary

soap bubble : a hollow iridescent globe formed by blowing a film of soapsuds (as from a pipe) — Webster

OneLook, Free Dictionary, Wiktionary

Thesaurus

Roget’s II (Thesaurus.com), Merriam-Webster Thesaurus, Visuwords

Encyclopedia

Soap bubble is an extremely thin film of soapy water enclosing air that forms a hollow sphere with an iridescent surface. Soap bubbles usually last for only a few seconds before bursting, either on their own or on contact with another object. They are often used for children’s enjoyment, but they are also used in artistic performances. Assembling several bubbles results in foam. When light shines onto a bubble it appears to change color. Unlike those seen in a rainbow, which arise from differential refraction, the colors seen in a soap bubble arise from interference of light reflecting off the front and back surfaces of the thin soap film. Depending on the thickness of the film, different colors interfere constructively and destructively. — Wikipedia

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WolframAlpha

Science





Physicists determine the optimal soap recipe for blowing gigantic bubbles (Jennifer Ouellette)
Physics of Giant Soap Bubbles (Emory University)
How to make a giant bubble (Stephen Frazier, Xinyi Jiang, and Justin C. Burton, Physical Review Fluids)

Technology


Preservation

History

A small history of soap bubbles (PUSTEFIX)

Museum

Bubbles (National Toy Hall of Fame, The Strong National Museum of Play)
Bubbles (Ron Hipschman, Exploratorium)

Library

WorldCat, Library of Congress, UPenn Online Books, Open Library

Participation

Education




Course



The Science of Soap Bubbles (MIT BLOSSOMS)

OER Commons: Open Educational Resources

News

Soap Bubble (Science Daily), Phys.org

Book

ISBNdb

Government

Document

USA.gov

Expression

Note: This is a 360° video — press and hold to explore it!

Fun




Toy

Amazon Toys

Arts

Performing Arts



Bubbleoogy (Keith Johnson, YouTube Channel)

The Lord of the Bubbles: Top World Class Bubble Shows

Visual Arts



Richard Heeks flickr

Poem

OEDILF: The Omnificent English Dictionary In Limerick Form

returntotop

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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories Phys.org internet news portal provides the latest news on science including: Physics, Nanotechnology, Life Sciences, Space Science, Earth Science, Environment, Health and Medicine.

  • Biodegradable glitter and pollution-eating...
    on May 28, 2020 at 1:16 pm

    The iridescence of marble berries and the clever, light-bending perforations of microalgae are inspiring scientists to create biodegradable glitter and makeup pigments, and bionic algae to use in lasers or to clean pollutants.

  • CRISPR plants: new non-GMO method to edit plants
    on May 13, 2020 at 5:10 pm

    An NC State researcher has developed a new way to get CRISPR/Cas9 into plant cells without inserting foreign DNA. This allows for precise genetic deletions or replacements, without inserting foreign DNA. Therefore, the end product is not a genetically modified organism, or GMO.

  • What do soap bubbles and butterflies have in...
    on April 7, 2020 at 7:33 pm

    Edith Smith bred a bluer and shinier Common Buckeye at her butterfly farm in Florida, but it took University of California, Berkeley, graduate student Rachel Thayer to explain the physical and genetic changes underlying the butterfly's newly acquired iridescence.

  • Measuring the sound of a soap bubble popping
    on March 2, 2020 at 2:00 pm

    A team of researchers from Sorbonne Université and the University of Lille has measured the sounds that occur when a soap bubble pops. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes the action as it unfolds and the sounds that are emitted as ordinary soap bubbles pop.

  • Mirrored chip could enable handheld dark-field...
    on February 24, 2020 at 3:00 pm

    Do a Google search for dark-field images, and you'll discover a beautifully detailed world of microscopic organisms set in bright contrast to their midnight-black backdrops. Dark-field microscopy can reveal intricate details of translucent cells and aquatic organisms, as well as faceted diamonds and other precious stones that would otherwise appear very faint or even invisible under a typical bright-field microscope.

  • Physics of giant bubbles bursts secret of fluid...
    on January 30, 2020 at 4:43 pm

    A study inspired by street performers making gigantic soap bubbles led to a discovery in fluid mechanics: Mixing different molecular sizes of polymers within a solution increases the ability of a thin film to stretch without breaking.

  • Hummingbirds' rainbow colors come from...
    on January 10, 2020 at 3:00 pm

    Hummingbirds are some of the most brightly-colored things in the entire world. Their feathers are iridescent— light bounces off them like a soap bubble, resulting in shimmering hues that shift as you look at them from different angles. While other birds like ducks can have bright feathers, nothing seems to come close to hummingbirds, and scientists weren't sure why. But a new study in Evolution shows that while hummingbird feathers have the same basic makeup as other birds', the special […]

  • Foam offers way to manipulate light
    on November 18, 2019 at 12:54 pm

    There is more to foam than meets the eye. Literally. A study by Princeton scientists has shown that a type of foam long studied by scientists is able to block particular wavelengths of light, a coveted property for next-generation information technology that uses light instead of electricity.

  • Proving a longstanding conjecture about the area...
    on November 8, 2019 at 12:44 pm

    Johns Hopkins mathematician Joel Spruck and a colleague recently succeeded in proving a longstanding conjecture about the area of negatively curved spaces, such as flower petals or coral reefs, a yearslong endeavor full unexpected hurdles and sleepless nights.

  • Size matters: How cells pack in epithelial tissues
    on September 5, 2019 at 3:00 pm

    Small-cell clones in proliferating epithelia—tissues that line all body surfaces—organize very differently than their normal-sized counterparts, according to a recent study from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research. Published online September 5, 2019, in Developmental Cell, these findings from the laboratory of Matthew Gibson, Ph.D., may contribute to a better understanding of how some human diseases progress.