Cuttlefish

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cuttlefish : any of various marine cephalopod mollusks (order Sepioidea, especially genus Sepia) having eight short arms and two usually longer tentacles and differing from the related squid in having a calcified internal shell — Webster

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Cuttlefish or cuttles are marine molluscs of the order Sepiida. They belong to the class Cephalopoda, which also includes squid, octopuses, and nautiluses. Cuttlefish have a unique internal shell, the cuttlebone. Cuttlefish also have large, W-shaped pupils, eight arms, and two tentacles furnished with denticulated suckers, with which they secure their prey. They generally range in size from 15 to 25 cm (6 to 10 in), with the largest species, Sepia apama, reaching 50 cm (20 in) in mantle length and over 10.5 kg (23 lb) in mass. — Wikipedia

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Scientists give cuttlefish 3D glasses and shrimp films for vision study (Ian Sample, The Guardian)
Cuttlefish use stereopsis to strike at prey (R. C. Feord, et al., Science Advances)

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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories Phys.org internet news portal provides the latest news on science including: Physics, Nanotechnology, Life Sciences, Space Science, Earth Science, Environment, Health and Medicine.

  • Researchers find cuttlebone's microstructure sits...
    on September 11, 2020 at 5:04 pm

    Ling Li has a lesson in one of his mechanical engineering courses on how brittle materials like calcium carbonate behave under stress. In it, he takes a piece of chalk composed of the compound and snaps it in half to show his students the edge of one of the broken pieces. The break is blunt and straight.

  • This cuttlefish is flamboyant on special...
    on August 20, 2020 at 7:58 am

    The flashy Flamboyant Cuttlefish is among the most famous of the cephalopods (octopus, squid, and cuttlefish)—but it is widely misunderstood by its legions of fans.

  • First gene knockout in cephalopod achieved
    on July 30, 2020 at 3:00 pm

    A team at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) has achieved the first gene knockout in a cephalopod using the squid Doryteuthis pealeii, an exceptionally important research organism in biology for nearly a century. The milestone study, led by MBL Senior Scientist Joshua Rosenthal and MBL Whitman Scientist Karen Crawford, is reported in the July 30 issue of Current Biology.

  • Great white shark diet surprises scientists
    on June 7, 2020 at 5:31 pm

    The first-ever detailed study of the diets of great white sharks off the east Australian coast reveals this apex predator spends more time feeding close to the seabed than expected.

  • To warn or to hide from predators? New computer...
    on April 17, 2020 at 4:27 pm

    Scientists have understood quite well why so many poisonous or bad-tasting animals have brightly colored bodies—the colors send a message to the predators: "Don't eat me, or you'll get sick and die." These permanent warning signals became textbook examples of 'aposematism,' which is the use of conspicuous signals to warn predators.