Cuttlefish

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cuttlefish : any of various marine cephalopod mollusks (order Sepioidea, especially genus Sepia) having eight short arms and two usually longer tentacles and differing from the related squid in having a calcified internal shell — Webster

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Cuttlefish or cuttles are marine molluscs of the order Sepiida. They belong to the class Cephalopoda, which also includes squid, octopuses, and nautiluses. Cuttlefish have a unique internal shell, the cuttlebone. Cuttlefish also have large, W-shaped pupils, eight arms, and two tentacles furnished with denticulated suckers, with which they secure their prey. They generally range in size from 15 to 25 cm (6 to 10 in), with the largest species, Sepia apama, reaching 50 cm (20 in) in mantle length and over 10.5 kg (23 lb) in mass. — Wikipedia

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Scientists give cuttlefish 3D glasses and shrimp films for vision study (Ian Sample, The Guardian)
Cuttlefish use stereopsis to strike at prey (R. C. Feord, et al., Science Advances)

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