Illusion

Cosma Home > Communication > Knowledge > Form > Expression > Belief > Illusion

Spotlight


Related

Pages

Belief Hypothesis, Forecast, Fiction, Rumor, Illusion, Superstition, Folklore, Faith

Resources

These are organized by a classification scheme developed exclusively for Cosma. More…

General

Dictionary

illusion : something that deceives or misleads intellectually — Webster

OneLook, Free Dictionary, Wiktionary, Urban Dictionary

Thesaurus

Roget’s II (Thesaurus.com), Merriam-Webster Thesaurus, Visuwords

Encyclopedia

Illusion is a distortion of the senses, revealing how the brain normally organizes and interprets sensory stimulation. Though illusions distort reality, they are generally shared by most people. Illusions may occur with any of the human senses, but visual illusions (optical illusions) are the best-known and understood. The emphasis on visual illusions occurs because vision often dominates the other senses. For example, individuals watching a ventriloquist will perceive the voice is coming from the dummy since they are able to see the dummy mouth the words. Some illusions are based on general assumptions the brain makes during perception. These assumptions are made using organizational principles (e.g., Gestalt theory), an individual’s capacity for depth perception and motion perception, and perceptual constancy. Other illusions occur because of biological sensory structures within the human body or conditions outside the body within one’s physical environment.

The term illusion refers to a specific form of sensory distortion. Unlike a hallucination, which is a distortion in the absence of a stimulus, an illusion describes a misinterpretation of a true sensation. For example, hearing voices regardless of the environment would be a hallucination, whereas hearing voices in the sound of running water (or other auditory source) would be an illusion.

Mimes are known for a repertoire of illusions that are created by physical means. The mime artist creates an illusion of acting upon or being acted upon by an unseen object. These illusions exploit the audience’s assumptions about the physical world. Well-known examples include “walls”, “climbing stairs”, “leaning”, “descending ladders”, and “pulling and pushing”. — Wikipedia

Illusion, Category (New World Encyclopedia), Britannica

Introduction

Illusions: Their Causes, Characteristics and Applications (Matthew Luckiesh, VisualIllusion.net)

Search

WolframAlpha

Innovation

Science

Illusion Sciences: why are we surprised by only some of the things that we see? (Arthur Shapiro)

Technology

HowStuffWorks, HowCast

Commerce

Product

Shop Grand Illusions Gift Zazzle

Preservation

History

History of Optical Illusions (Think Quest)

Quotation

Quotations Page

Museum





More “Trick Eye” Museums…

Library

WorldCat, Library of Congress, UPenn Online Books, Open Library

Participation

Community

Blog

Mighty Optical Illusions, WordPress

News

Illusions Department (Scientific American),NPR Archives

Book

ISBNdb

Government

Document

USA.gov

Expression






Fun


Arts


Poem

OEDILF: The Omnificent English Dictionary In Limerick Form

Music

Song Lyrics

Rumor

Snopes.com

returntotop

More…