Jellyfish

Cosma Home > Communication > Knowledge > Realm > Terrestrial > Sphere > Life > Animal > Jellyfish

Spotlight

Note: These are 360° videos — press and hold to explore it!




Jellies Invasion (National Aquarium) (Live cam)

Resources

These are organized by a classification scheme developed exclusively for Cosma. More…

General

Dictionary

jellyfish : the typically free-swimming, bell-shaped, usually sexually-reproducing solitary or colonial form of a cnidarian in which the whorls of tentacles lined with nematocysts arise and hang down from the margin of the nearly transparent, gelatinous bell — Webster

OneLook, Free Dictionary, Wiktionary

Thesaurus

Roget’s II (Thesaurus.com), Merriam-Webster Thesaurus, Visuwords

Encyclopedia

Jellyfish or sea jellies are the informal common names given to the medusa-phase of certain gelatinous members of the subphylum Medusozoa, a major part of the phylum Cnidaria. Jellyfish are mainly free-swimming marine animals with umbrella-shaped bells and trailing tentacles, although a few are not mobile, being anchored to the seabed by stalks. The bell can pulsate to provide propulsion and highly efficient locomotion. The tentacles are armed with stinging cells and may be used to capture prey and defend against predators. Jellyfish have a complex life cycle; the medusa is normally the sexual phase, the planula larva can disperse widely and is followed by a sedentary polyp phase.

Jellyfish are found all over the world, from surface waters to the deep sea. Scyphozoans (the “true jellyfish”) are exclusively marine, but some hydrozoans with a similar appearance live in freshwater. Large, often colorful, jellyfish are common in coastal zones worldwide. The medusae of most species are fast growing, mature within a few months and die soon after breeding, but the polyp stage, attached to the seabed, may be much more long-lived. Jellyfish have been in existence for at least 500 million years, and possibly 700 million years or more, making them the oldest multi-organ animal group.

Jellyfish are used in research, where the green fluorescent protein, used by some species to cause bioluminescence, has been adapted as a fluorescent marker for genes inserted into other cells or organisms. The stinging cells used by jellyfish to subdue their prey can also injure humans. Many thousands of swimmers are stung every year, with effects ranging from mild discomfort to serious injury or even death; small box jellyfish are responsible for many of these deaths. When conditions are favourable, jellyfish can form vast swarms. These can be responsible for damage to fishing gear by filling fishing nets, and sometimes clog the cooling systems of power and desalination plants which draw their water from the sea. — Wikipedia

Encyclopædia Britannica

Introduction



Our Favorite Jellyfish Facts (National Aquarium)

Search

WolframAlpha

Science



The Immortal Jellyfish (American Museum of Natural History)

Technology

How Jellyfish Work (Stephanie Watson (How Stuff Works)

Preservation

Museum



World’s largest jellyfish collection (Euronews)
Kamo Suizoku-kan (Official Site)

Jellyfish Museum, Kiev, Ukraine (Trip Adviser)
Jellyfish Museum, Kiev, Ukraine (Official Site)

Library

WorldCat, Library of Congress, UPenn Online Books, Open Library

Participation

Education


Jellyfish (Biology4Kids)

OER Commons: Open Educational Resources

News

Phys.org, NPR Archives

Book

ISBNdb

Government

Document

USA.gov

Expression


Fun


Adventure


Palau’s Jellyfish Lake reopens as thousands of jellyfish return (Maggie Hiufu Wong, CNN)
Ongeim’l Tketau Jellyfish Lake – Open to Visitors (Palau Gov)
Jellyfish Lake, Eil Malk island, Palau (Wikipedia)

Poem

OEDILF: The Omnificent English Dictionary In Limerick Form

Music

Song Lyrics

Fiction

Fictional jellyfish (Wikipedia)

returntotop

More…

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories Phys.org internet news portal provides the latest news on science including: Physics, Nanotechnology, Life Sciences, Space Science, Earth Science, Environment, Health and Medicine.

  • Italy's seas speak: No tourists or boats mean...
    on May 30, 2020 at 9:51 am

    Pollution from human and agriculture waste spilling into the seas off Rome has decreased 30% during Italy's coronavirus lockdown, preliminary results from a nationwide survey of seawater quality indicate.

  • Under pressure, black holes feast
    on May 27, 2020 at 4:28 pm

    A new, Yale-led study shows that some supermassive black holes actually thrive under pressure.

  • Journey to uncover mysteries of the Pacific Ocean
    on May 22, 2020 at 2:25 pm

    On 14 February, nine National University of Singapore (NUS) researchers hopped onboard a vessel to start a 37-day expedition to explore an understudied area nestled in the Pacific Ocean known as the Clarion-Clipperton Zone (CCZ). Flat and deep—reaching down between 4,000 to 6,000 metres below the surface—the CCZ is often referred to as an abyssal plain.

  • Tiny plankton drive processes in the ocean that...
    on May 21, 2020 at 2:13 pm

    The ocean plays a major role in the global carbon cycle. The driving force comes from tiny plankton that produce organic carbon through photosynthesis, like plants on land.

  • Shrinking snowcaps fuel harmful algal blooms in...
    on May 4, 2020 at 10:00 am

    A uniquely resilient organism all but unheard of in the Arabian Sea 20 years ago has been proliferating and spreading at an alarming pace, forming thick, malodorous green swirls and filaments that are visible even from space. This unusual organism is Noctiluca scintillans—a millimeter-size planktonic organism with an extraordinary capacity to survive, thrive and force out diatoms, the photosynthesizing plankton that have traditionally supported the Arabian Sea food web. Noctiluca is not a […]