Tree

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Giant Redwoods and Sequoias (Sequoia National Park)
About the Trees: Redwood (National and State Parks
California)

Redwood National and State Parks (Wikipedia)
Sequoioideae (Wikipedia)

Related

Pages

Terrestrial (Earth)
Sphere Land, Ice, Water (Ocean), Air, Life (Cell, Gene, Microscope)
Ecosystem Forest, Grassland, Desert, Arctic, Aquatic

Tree of Life
Microorganism
Plant Flower, Tree
Animal
Invertebrate Octopus, Ant, Bee, Butterfly, Spider, Lobster
Vertebrate Fish, Seahorse, Ray, Shark, Frog, Turtle, Tortoise, Dinosaur
Bird, Ostrich, Owl, Crow, Parrot
Mammal Bat, Rabbit, Giraffe, Camel, Horse, Elephant, Mammoth
Whale, Dolphin, Walrus, Seal, Polar Bear, Bear, Cat, Tiger, Lion, Dog, Wolf
Monkey, Chimpanzee, Human

Resources

These are organized by a classification scheme developed exclusively for Cosma. More…

General

Portal

Trees are Good (International Society of Arboriculture), Trees Group, Trees Portal (Wikipedia)

Dictionary

tree : a woody perennial plant having a single usually elongate main stem generally with few or no branches on its lower part — Webster

OneLook, Free Dictionary, Wiktionary

Thesaurus

Roget’s II (Thesaurus.com), Merriam-Webster Thesaurus, Visuwords

Encyclopedia

Tree is a perennial plant with an elongated stem, or trunk, supporting branches and leaves in most species. In some usages, the definition of a tree may be narrower, including only woody plants with secondary growth, plants that are usable as lumber or plants above a specified height. Trees are not a taxonomic group but include a variety of plant species that have independently evolved a woody trunk and branches as a way to tower above other plants to compete for sunlight. In looser senses, the taller palms, the tree ferns, bananas and bamboos are also trees. Trees tend to be long-lived, some reaching several thousand years old. Trees have been in existence for 370 million years. — Wikipedia

David Darling’s Internet Encyclopedia of Science, Tree Facts (Trees Group), Encyclopædia Britannica

OneZoom Tree of Life EXplorer
Tree of Life Web Project

System

Science

Arboriculture is the cultivation, management, and study of individual trees, shrubs, vines, and other perennial woody plants. The science of arboriculture studies how these plants grow and respond to cultural practices and to their environment. The practice of arboriculture includes cultural techniques such as selection, planting, training, fertilization, pest and pathogen control, pruning, shaping, and removal.

A person who practices or studies arboriculture can be termed an ‘arborist’ or an ‘arboriculturist’. A ‘tree surgeon’ is more typically someone who is trained in the physical maintenance and manipulation of trees and therefore more a part of the arboriculture process rather than an arborist. Risk management, legal issues, and aesthetic considerations have come to play prominent roles in the practice of arboriculture. Businesses often need to hire arboriculturists to complete “tree hazard surveys” and generally manage the trees on-site to fulfill occupational safety and health obligations.

Arboriculture is primarily focused on individual woody plants and trees maintained for permanent landscape and amenity purposes, usually in gardens, parks or other populated settings, by arborists, for the enjoyment, protection, and benefit of people. — Wikipedia

Encyclopædia Britannica

Science

Wood wide web: The underground network of microbes that connects trees—mapped for first time (Gabriel Popkin, Science Magazine)
Do Trees Talk to Each Other? (Richard Grant, Smithsonian Magazine)
The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate (Peter Wohlleben)

Technology

Leafsnap: An Electronic Field Guide

Preservation

The Center for Tree Science: Securing the future of trees (The Morton Arboretum)

History

The History of Arboriculture (Citywide)

Dendrochronology (or tree-ring dating) is the scientific method of dating tree rings (also called growth rings) to the exact year they were formed in order to analyze atmospheric conditions during different periods in history.

Dendrochronology is useful for determining the timing of events and rates of change in the environment (most prominently climate) and also in works of art and architecture, such as old panel paintings on wood, buildings, etc. It is also used in radiocarbon dating to calibrate radiocarbon ages.

New growth in trees occurs in a layer of cells near the bark. A tree’s growth rate changes in a predictable pattern throughout the year in response to seasonal climate changes, resulting in visible growth rings. Each ring marks a complete cycle of seasons, or one year, in the tree’s life. As of 2013, the oldest tree-ring measurements in the Northern Hemisphere are a floating sequence extending from about 12,580 to 13,900 years. — Wikipedia

Encyclopædia Britannica

The Tree-Ring Society
Tree-Ring Basics (Rocky Mountain Tree-Ring Research)
Tree-Ring Resources (Rocky Mountain Tree-Ring Research)
Bristlecone Pine Dendrochronology (Leonard Miller)
Dendrochronology Resources (Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona)

Pando is the name of the largest organism on Earth, and one of the oldest (Pando Populus)
Pando (Wikipedia)
Quaking aspen (Wikipedia)

One of the world’s largest organisms is shrinking (David Shultz, Science Magazine)
The Biggest Organism on Earth Is Dying, and It’s Our Fault (Yessenia Funes, Gizmodo)

Quotation

Tree Quotes (Trees Group), Quotations Page

Library

WorldCat, Library of Congress, UPenn Online Books, Open Library

Participation

Education

Educational Activities about Trees (Trees are Good)

Course

Crash Course Biology (YouTube Playlist)

OER Commons: Open Educational Resources

Community

Occupation

Arborist (Trees are Good)

Organization

International Society of Arboriculture

News

Science Daily, Phys.org, NPR Archives

Book

ISBNdb

Government

Document

USA.gov

Expression

Fun

Tree Jokes (Trees Group)

Adventure

Freespirit Spheres (Vancover Island, Canada)

Out’n’About Treehouses Treesort (Takilma, Oregon)
Azulik Resort (Tulum, Mexico)
Treehouse Lodge Resort (Iquitos, Peru)

Mystery

Note: This is a 360° Video — press and hold to explore it!

There’s a Forest in Poland Filled With Crooked Trees, And No One Can Explain Why (Jack Sommer, Science Alert)
Crooked Forest (Wikipedia)

Arts

Tree Hugger Project (Agnieszka Gradzik & Wiktor Szostalo)
Tree Hugger Project (Agnieszka Gradzik, Wikipedia)

Poem

Tree Poems (Trees Group), OEDILF: The Omnificent English Dictionary In Limerick Form

Music

Tree Music (Trees Group), Song Lyrics

Fiction

Ents (Tolkien Gateway)

Tree of Souls (Avatar Wiki)

Folklore and Myth

returntotop

More…

Trees News -- ScienceDaily Read all about trees, including the latest research on many tree species, insect infestations, and the role of trees in ecology. Full articles, photos, free.

  • 50 million-year-old fossil assassin bug has...
    on January 19, 2021 at 3:28 pm

    The fossilized insect is tiny and its genital capsule, called a pygophore, is roughly the length of a grain of rice. It is remarkable, scientists say, because the bug's physical characteristics -- from the bold banding pattern on its legs to the internal features of its genitalia -- are clearly visible and well-preserved. Recovered from the Green River Formation in present-day Colorado, the fossil represents a new genus and species of predatory insects known as assassin bugs.

  • Scientists reduce uncertainty in forest carbon...
    on January 14, 2021 at 4:19 pm

    Investors who bet on tropical forest conservation and reforestation to solve global warming by storing carbon in wood face huge uncertainties because the science behind predicting carbon stocks is still shaky. Even the best Earth Systems Models fail to predict how carbon stored by tropical forests varies from place to place.

  • This tree snake climbs with a lasso-like motion
    on January 11, 2021 at 4:21 pm

    Researchers have discovered that invasive brown tree snakes living on Guam can get around in a way that had never been seen before. The discovery of the snake's lasso-like locomotion for climbing their way up smooth vertical cylinders has important implications, both for understanding the snakes and for conservation practices aimed at protecting birds from them.

  • Conifers can be green because of a photosynthetic...
    on December 23, 2020 at 5:57 pm

    How can conifers that are used, for example, as Christmas trees, keep their green needles over the boreal winter when most trees shed their leaves? Science has not provided a good answer to this question but now an international team of scientists has deciphered that a short-cut in the photosynthetic machinery allows the needles of pine trees to stay green.

  • A new species of mammal may have been found in...
    on December 22, 2020 at 6:20 pm

    A research team has discovered a tree hyrax in the Taita Hills, Kenya, which may belong to a species previously unknown to science.


Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories Phys.org internet news portal provides the latest news on science including: Physics, Nanotechnology, Life Sciences, Space Science, Earth Science, Environment, Health and Medicine.

  • How climate change is affecting gardens
    on January 29, 2020 at 2:01 pm

    According to Dr. Dave Kendal from the University of Tasmania, in the next 50 years, 20-50% of current plant species in botanic gardens and urban landscapes will likely confront temperatures those species have never experienced before.

  • Oaks instead of palm trees? Florida's iconic...
    on November 22, 2019 at 6:30 pm

    South Florida's palm trees are postcard promises of sighing sea breezes and sandy beaches, but the icon of the tropics may be an impractical adornment in an era of climate change.

  • The overlooked third man
    on April 20, 2015 at 2:50 pm

    The horticulturist who came up with the concept of 'evolution by natural selection' 27 years before Charles Darwin did should be more widely acknowledged for his contribution, states a new paper by a King's College London geneticist.

  • How ancient species survived or died off in their...
    on April 16, 2015 at 8:31 pm

    "The answers to extinction, survival and evolution are right here in the dirt," says University of Cincinnati Quaternary science researcher Ken Tankersley, associate professor of anthropology and geology. "And we are continually surprised by what we find."

  • A thousand years of environmental change in...
    on November 14, 2014 at 12:00 pm

    Environmental change is nothing new in Polynesia. For centuries, the inhabitants of the volcanic, sea-battered islands have been employing a variety of strategies to adapt to their changing landscapes.