Notes

Cosma / Documentation / Notes

Cosma uses a “embedded and distributed documentation” approach. This means that there is some basic information on the About page, and then some standard information on the FAQ and Credits pages. Beyond that, there are many passages and footnotes about the project distributed across many pages in the context where they are relevant. These are also gathered together in one place on the this page, so this is a cumulative and evolving collection of clippings about the history, theory and structure of Cosma.


About

Cosmos : Greek kosmos (masculine) an orderly harmonious systematic universe – M. Webster
Cosma : Greek kosma (feminine) an orderly harmonious systematic description of the universe – M. E. Hopper

Cosma is an initiative to create an inventory of the best knowledge resources in the world with neat ways to navigate and explore them.1

1.   Cosma is only the most recent iteration of a project that has been evolving for decades. It is based upon over thirty years of research and development in information, knowledge and communication systems. It’s been a long road, and quite the journey! Here are just a few references to some stops along the way…
Hopper, M. E. (2009, April). Cosma: Constructing a Kingdom of Knowledge. Media in Transition 6 Conference: Stone and Papyrus, Storage and Transmission, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA.
Hopper, M. E. (2007, April). The Knowledge Gates to SecondLife. Media in Transition 5 Conference: Creativity, Ownership and Collaboration in the Digital Age, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA.
Hopper, M. E. (2000, January). Knowledge systems 101: From Alexandria to Hitchhiker’s Guide. Independent Activity Period, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA.
Hopper, M. E. (1999, October). A Project About Projects: Watching Academic E-Media Projects Evolve [Presentation]. Media in Transition: An International Conference, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA.
Hopper, M. E. (1998, October). Hypertext in historical context: Vannevar Bush and Ted Nelson revisited. Media-in-Transition Project / Communications Forum, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA.
Hopper, M. E. (1993). Expert’s views about courseware development in advanced computing environments [Abstract]. Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 93 – Conference on Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia, 607.
Hopper, M. E. (1993). Educational courseware production in advanced computing environments. Unpublished doctoral dissertation. Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN.


Contents

The qualities that make humans beings unique are the ability to use symbols and the ability to use tools, so it is not at all surprising that the discipline that concerns itself with the use of symbols as a tool is one that can subsume all other disciplines and encompass the entirety of humanity’s accomplishments.” – M. E. Hopper

Use the outline on the Contents page of this site to systematically master knowledge!


Communication

Communication is the master discipline that subsumes all other disciplines.
Cosma embodies that discipline and provides a variety of interfaces to it.

Use the outline on the contents page of this site to systematically master knowledge!

The qualities that make humans beings unique are the ability to use symbols and the ability to use tools, so it is not at all surprising that the discipline that concerns itself with the use of symbols as a tool is one that can subsume all other disciplines and encompass the entirety of humanity’s accomplishments.” — M. E. Hopper

Communication System
Cosma provides access to extensive knowledge resources organized around these basic elements of a communication system: Media (channel), Knowledge (message)
, Human (sender/receiver) and Noise (interference). See also System and Outline (Site Map)

Communication Content

The “DIKW Hierarchy”, also known variously as the “Wisdom Hierarchy”, the “Knowledge Hierarchy”, the “Information Hierarchy”, and the “Knowledge Pyramid”, refers loosely to a class of models for representing structural and/or functional relationships between the communication of data, information, knowledge, and wisdom. — Wikipedia

Most writers about the hierarchy refer to this passage from T. S. Eliot’s The Rock.

Where is the Life we have lost in living?
Where is the wisdom we have lost in knowledge?
Where is the knowledge we have lost in information? — T.S. Eliot, The Rock

Russell Ackoff popularized the hierarchy to categorize the content of communication.
From data to wisdom (Russell L. Ackoff, Journal of Applies Systems Analysis)
The wisdom of the world: Messages for the new millennium (Russell L. Ackoff, The Futurist)
On passing through 80 (Russell L. Ackoff, Systemic practice and action research)

See Data, Information, Knowledge and Wisdom

Other Related Subjects
Communication, transportation, information technology and commerce have also been inextricably intertwined since the beginning of human history, and they still remain closely related today.

“The success of the first electronic telegraph line in 1844 opened an era of modern communication in America. Before the telegraph there existed no separation between transportation and communication. Information traveled only as fast as the messenger who carried it.” — D. J. Czitrom, Media and the American Mind

This reality was even codified in the Dewey Decimal library classification system:
380 Commerce, communications, transportation

See Transportation, Information Technology and Commerce


Knowledge

This page is one of the most important pages on the Cosma Web site. Cosma is founded upon the premise that when Knowledge Resources are systematically identified, intuitively (re)organized, and then presented in a spatial format, everyone can master finding them quickly and easily. This premise has driven the development of Cosma. Of course, doing this involved thouroughly understanding a lot about “Knowledge” (e.g. Knowledge Management, Knowledge Theory, Knowledge Organization etc.) in fact, this ended up requiring treating “Knowledge” as the discipline that it can be, in and of itself, and that is represented in the page below. 1

1.   One stop in the saga of Mary E. Hopper’s mission to understand “Knowledge” as a discipline took her to MIT where she developed and presented this short course during her Post Doc in Comparative Media Studies.
Hopper, M. E. (2000, January). Knowledge systems 101: From Alexandria to Hitchhiker’s Guide [Short Course]. Independent Activity Period (IAP), Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA.


Knowledge Resources

In its final form, Cosma will provide access to millions of discrete resources across over a thousand subject pages. At this point it already provides systematic access to hundreds of thousands of resources over a growing list of pages. 1 This page provides just a glimpse into just a few of the most basic, common and standard resources you can access using the system already. They are organized by a classification scheme developed exclusively for Cosma. More…

1.   The Knowledge Resources Inventory, which is at the heart of Cosma, is based upon M. E. Hopper’s belief that there is a definable, stable set of core knowledge resources in the World that can be identified in a systematic, top-down search and then tracked and presented in a “directory” like structure. This led a to a long-term initiative to do just that. Here is one of many presentations where she described her project.
Hopper, M. E. (1999, October). A Project About Projects: Watching Academic E-Media Projects Evolve [Presentation]. Media in Transition: An International Conference, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA.


Knowledge Forms

Cosma uses a special scheme for classifying and organizing resources into over a hundred categories. The scheme is a synthesis of a number of other schemes, including Dewey Decimal’s Generalities and the Library of Congress’s Genre/Form Headings among others. It is also structured around the Knowledge Cycle. One of the primary purposes of the scheme is to make hundreds of links per page seem reasonably accessible to typical users.


Knowledge Realms

Collecting hundreds of thousands of Knowledge Resources over the course of decades is easier than you might think. Figuring out how to organize them in order to make them findable is hard. Adding the additional constraint of needing to organize them into a literal map in order to create 3D interfaces to enable spatial Knowledge Navigation creates a sticky problem. Of course, there is a long history of how to deal with such Knowledge Organization problems. However, there is no perfect solution — there are only a series of trade-offs in adopting any ontology. In practice, Cosma does not use any specific existing system to “layout” knowledge such as the Great Chain of Being or the Tree of Diderot and d’Alembert. Instead, all of the virtual spaces that serve as 3D interfaces to Cosma are laid out into five “Realms” based upon an amalgamation of taxonomies for organizing reality into hierarchies and physical maps. 1

1.   The problem of how to organize and present the systematic, top down inventory of Knowledge Resources was such a sticky problem, Hopper ended up taking graduate courses in Cataloging, Reference and Digital Libraries at Simmons University’s School of Library and Information Science to figure it out. The review of all of the text based and cartographic layouts that were considered, and how the chosen ones were integrated into the final layouts used for Cosma‘s Content Outline and 3D Interfaces is a long story — it’s way too long to tell in this little footnote 🙂


Navigation

Cosma is founded upon the premise that when Knowledge Resources are systematically identified, intuitively (re)organized, and then presented in an easily navigatable way, everyone can master finding them quickly and easily. This premise drove the development of Cosma. That is why there are a number of ways of getting around this Web site. For example, you can browse a visual menu of some popular Categories of content, and you can also read “posts” about Adventures through interesting and fun resources on the Web.

Most importantly, a key goal of Cosma is to have a 3D interface to enable truly spatial Knowledge Navigation, so you will also find special 3D interfaces to this Web site on the Worlds page. Finally, if you want to see a thorough description of what is on the Web site, then just go to the traditional Contents and Index pages.


Knowledge Navigation

A key goal of Cosma is to have a 3D interface to enable truly spatial “Knowledge Navigation”of the Knowledge Resources hosted on the Cosma Web site. It would be impossible to overstate the centrality of the concept of Knowledge Navigation to Cosma. The project is founded upon the premise that when knowledge is intuitively (re)organized, and then presented in a spatial format, everyone can easily master it. This premise has driven the development of Cosma, and that is why this site features Worlds for you to use to explore this Web site and others. You can find out a lot more about the history of the ongoing quest to provide a 3D interface to Cosma on the Worlds Challenge page. 1

knowledge navigation : : to steer a course through the body of truth, information, and principles acquired by humankind — M. E. Hopper

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Hypertext in historical context: Vannevar Bush and Ted Nelson revisited
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Knowledge Systems 101
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1.   One stop in the saga of Mary E. Hopper’s mission to enable truly spatial knowledge navigation took her to MIT where she developed content for a presentation and a short course during her Post Doc in Comparative Media Studies.
Hopper, M. E. (1998, October). Hypertext in historical context: Vannevar Bush and Ted Nelson revisited. Media-in-Transition Project / Communications Forum, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA.
Hopper, M. E. (2000, January). Knowledge systems 101: From Alexandria to Hitchhiker’s Guide [Short Course]. Independent Activity Period (IAP), Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA.

Hopper’s obsession with Knowledge Navigation has gone so far as to lead to making up a significant percentage of her New Media Museum! In actuality, that museum is truly a sister project to Cosma at the deepest level. Here are links to the part of the collection related to Knowledge Navigation (Navigation, Trailblazers, Service, Hypermedia, World).


Worlds

Cosma features 3D interfaces to the Knowledge Resources inventory hosted on this site.

The above are just a few examples of Mary Hopper’s experiments with creating 3D interfaces. The first generation of experiments were created with Apple’s HyperCard that ran in color on an Apple IIGS with ProDOS in the 1980s. There have been many other experiments and prototypes since then. You can find out more about them on the Worlds Challenge page.


Worlds Challenge

A key goal of Cosma is to provide a 3D interface to enable truly spatial Knowledge Navigation of the Knowledge Resources hosted on the Cosma Web site. Dr. M.E. Hopper has experimented with creating many different 2D visual and 3D spatial interfaces to internet resources with a wide variety of software platforms since the 1980s. The first generation of experiments were created with Apple’s HyperCard that ran in color on an Apple IIGS with ProDOS. Since that time experimental interfaces have been created with most of the “hypermedia” software that could support making such interfaces (MicroWorlds Pro, HyperStudio, Power Point, Director, etc.). It’s been quite a journey, and the saga is still continuing today because the truth is that there is no ideal software platform available to the general public at the present time. This page includes a history of past interfaces, current work and pointers to future directions.1

1.   Hopper worked on a number of academic projects that used Logo and HyperCard during the late 1980s and early 1990s, and she also co-published about some of her work on those projects.
Hopper, M. E. and Lawler, R. W. (1991, August). Pre-Readers’ Word Worlds: Results of experiences with young children and new directions [Poster]. Thirteenth annual meeting of the Cognitive Science Society, Evanston, IL.
Hopper, M. E., LeBold, W. K., Feghali, A. A. (1991). A hypermedia-based problem solving approach to engineering, learning, working, and playing. Frontiers in Education Conference Proceedings, 73-78.

2.   Knowledge Places and Knowledge Objects were developed by Dr. M. E. Hopper while she was President of Knowledge Foundry, a small company that developed traditional Web, social media, 3D, eBook and mobile sites. Remnants of the original website are still online.

3.   Some of the content on this page was originally developed for two presentations at MIT.
The first presentation in April 2007 was attended by Cory Ondrejka (SL Alt. Cory Linden, Chief Technology Officer@Second Life/Linden Lab) and John Lester (SL Alt. Pathfinder Linden, Second Life Lead Evangelist, Market Development, Boston Operations Director, Market Development in Education@Second Life/Linden Lab).
Hopper, M. E. (2007, April). The Knowledge Gates to SecondLife. Media in Transition 5 Conference: Creativity, Ownership and Collaboration in the Digital Age, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA.
Hopper, M. E. (2009, April). Cosma: Constructing a Kingdom of Knowledge. Media in Transition 6 Conference: Stone and Papyrus, Storage and Transmission, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA.


Knowledge Objects (K-Objects)

Knowledge Objects 1
Spatial Knowledge Navigation Devices
Thousands of virtual objects distributed over twenty + regions, 1,000,000 + sq. m. (2006-Present)

K-Objects@K-Gardens

A major goal of Cosma is to provide a 3D “hypermedia” interface to enable truly spatial Knowledge Navigation2 of the inventory of Knowledge Resources on the Cosma Web site.   There have been many experiments with doing this with a variety of platforms since the 1980s (MicroWorlds Pro, HyperCard, HyperStudio, Power Point, Director, RoundMe, Unity, etc.).

The Knowledge Places (K-Places) project was the longest running and most extensive experiment to date. It began in 2006 and used the virtual world Second Life. At the height of the project in 2010, there were many sites that covered more than a million square meters of land in Second Life. The sites were made up of thematically organized spaces designed around inviting spatial metaphors (e.g. tropical resort, zoo, amusement park, etc.). You can find out more about the project on the K-Places page.

The core of the K-Places project was a cadre of 3D links dubbed Knowledge Objects (K-Objects), and they enabled truly spatial Knowledge Navigation.   Magic Windows were 3D hyperlinks to Cosma, and Magic Doors were 3D hyperlinks to other locations in Second Life. There was also a cast of other K-Objects that served as “typed” hyperlinks to access other valuable Web sites besides Cosma. You can find out more about them on the K-Objects page.

Knowledge Objects Cast

Hundreds of content specific versions of each of the K-Objects were generated, and then they were distributed throughout the multitude of content specific “spaces” in the K-Places sites. This enabled a thematic approach for exploring Cosma, other Web sites and Second Life.

The core of K-Places was a cadre of 3D links dubbed Knowledge Objects (K-Objects). They were based on the earlier 2D “visual” hyperlinks that Mary E. Hopper created while using HyperCard to create pictorial interfaces to internet resources in the late 1980s. Those 2D visual objects evolved into 3D objects to enable spatial Knowledge Navigation.3

1.   Much of the content on this page was originally developed for two presentations at MIT.
The first presentation in April 2007 was attended by Cory Ondrejka (SL Alt. Cory Linden, Chief Technology Officer@Second Life/Linden Lab) and John Lester (SL Alt. Pathfinder Linden, Second Life Lead Evangelist, Market Development, Boston Operations Director, Market Development in Education@Second Life/Linden Lab).
Hopper, M. E. (2007, April). The Knowledge Gates to SecondLife. Media in Transition 5 Conference: Creativity, Ownership and Collaboration in the Digital Age, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA.
Hopper, M. E. (2009, April). Cosma: Constructing a Kingdom of Knowledge. Media in Transition 6 Conference: Stone and Papyrus, Storage and Transmission, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA.

2.   It would be impossible to overstate the centrality of the concept of Knowledge Navigation to Cosma. The whole project is founded upon the premise that when knowledge is intuitively organized, and then presented in a visual and/or spatial way, everyone can master it quickly and easily. This premise has driven the development of Cosma and, truthfully, Mary E. Hopper’s career. You can find out more about some of the saga on the Worlds Challenge page.

One stop in the saga of Hopper’s mission to enable truly spatial knowledge navigation took her to MIT where she developed content for a presentation and then a short course during her Post Doc in Comparative Media Studies.
Hopper, M. E. (1998, October). Hypertext in historical context: Vannevar Bush and Ted Nelson revisited. Media-in-Transition Project / Communications Forum, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA.
Hopper, M. E. (2000, January). Knowledge systems 101: From Alexandria to Hitchhiker’s Guide [Short Course]. Independent Activity Period (IAP), Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA.

Hopper’s obsession with the subject of Knowledge Navigation has gone so far as to lead to the related software and materials she has collected making up a very significant percentage of the collections in her New Media Museum!

In actuality, the New Media Museum is truly a sister project to Cosma at the deepest level. Here are links to the part of the collection related to Knowledge Navigation (Navigation, Trailblazers, Service, Hypermedia, World).

3.   The first Knowledge Objects (K-Objects) in Second Life were created in 2006 by Mary E. Hopper with programming assistance from Neil R. Carlson in 2006 while Hopper was President of Knowledge Foundry (K-Foundry), a small company that developed Web, 3D, eBook and mobile sites. Remnants of the original website are still online.

4.   Hopper had taken graduate courses in Cataloging, Reference, Digital Libraries and Archives at Simmons College’s School of Library and Information Science just a few years before creating K-Objects. Needless to say, Dewey Dots were near and dear to her heart, and they also served as tongue in cheek “Librarian bait” for K-Places.

5.   Hopper was very highly dedicated to creating and publishing free educational resources from early on in her career. This was reflected in many of her activities at MIT between 1990 and the early 2000s, and it culminated in a well attended presentation on the subject just two months before MIT OpenCourseWare was announced on April 4, 2001 with Steven R. Lerman as Director (he had been Hopper’s Doctoral Committee Member and then employer at the Center for Educational Computing Initiatives during her decade at MIT). The goal of the presentation was to start an initiative to create free courses. Hopper’s position was that the best model was shareware based upon the success of Minnesota Educational Computing Consortium (i.e. The Oregon Trail, Munchers, Lemonade Stand, etc.).
Hopper, M. E. & Summer, R. B. (2001, February). Where’s the media? Models for creating and distributing teacher and student made digital media. Second Wiring the Classroom Conference. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA.

In addition, Hopper was serving as a full-time faculty member in Lesley University’s Technology & Education Graduate Program at the time she created the Learning Link. The idea behind this K-Object was to have K-Places serve as an exercise for her students (who were teachers) to explore free educational resources in a fun way.


Knowledge Places (K-Places)

Knowledge Places 1
Knowledge Navigation & Exploration Centers
Second Life, & RoundMe & Unity 3D (2006-Present)

Knowledge Places Welcome Center

A primary goal of Cosma is to provide a 3D “hypermedia” interface to enable truly spatial Knowledge Navigation of the inventory of Knowledge Resources on the Cosma Web site.   There have been many experiments with creating these interfaces on a variety of platforms since the 1980s (MicroWorlds, HyperCard, HyperStudio, Director, etc.).

The Knowledge Places (K-Places) project was the longest running and most extensive experiment so far. It used the virtual world named Second Life to create a 3D version of an earlier 2D interface to internet resources that Mary E. Hopper made with Apple’s HyperCard running in color on an Apple IIGS with ProDOS in the late 1980s.

Primary development on K-Places began in 2006, and at the height of the project in 2010, there were more than ten highly visible sites that covered more than a million square meters of land in Second Life. The sites were made up of thematically organized spaces within “places” designed around inviting metaphors (e.g. tropical resort, zoo, amusement park, etc.).

The sites have waxed and waned in popularity, but over the course of the more than fifteen years of experiments with using Second Life as 3D interfaces to Cosma, there have been many tens of thousands of visitors. Second Life employs fictional names and also enforces anonymity, so it is “almost” impossible to know who the people are in Real Life (RL), but it is fair to say that the more that someone has used Second Life, the more likely it is that they know of the sites. The “hard core users” and “older residents” are almost certainly aware of them and have probably visited them.

Dr. M. E. Hopper also presented about K-Places at a number of professional events that were attended by thousands of people — some of the attendees of those events were also likely visitors to the sites in Second Life. 2

The K-Places sites continued to be expanded and maintained until 2014. At the height of development in 2010, wandering the grounds of the sites would take visitors to over a thousand interesting things to see and do.

1.   Much of the content on this page was originally developed for two presentations at MIT.
The first presentation in April 2007 was attended by Cory Ondrejka (SL Alt. Cory Linden, Chief Technology Officer@Second Life/Linden Lab) and John Lester (SL Alt. Pathfinder Linden, Second Life Lead Evangelist, Market Development, Boston Operations Director, Market Development in Education@Second Life/Linden Lab).
Hopper, M. E. (2007, April). The Knowledge Gates to SecondLife. Media in Transition 5 Conference: Creativity, Ownership and Collaboration in the Digital Age, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA.
Hopper, M. E. (2009, April). Cosma: Constructing a Kingdom of Knowledge. Media in Transition 6 Conference: Stone and Papyrus, Storage and Transmission, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA.

2.   Dr. Hopper was near the end of her Postdoc at MIT in 2002 when she saw Mitch Kapor give a demo of Linden World (only had a single region/sim at that time). Then she saw a demo of Active Worlds a few years later. Standards for the 3D web were starting to mature as well. It was becoming clearer that one of the three would probably be the software platform that would allow her to finally fully implement the project she had envisioned for decades. She continued watched the three platforms develop over the next few years. Hopper knew for sure which platform she would use after attending the demos of them at SIGGRAPH 2006 in Boston. The answer became crystal clear and shortly after that serious development in SecondLife began.
3.   Knowledge Places and Knowledge Objects were developed by Dr. M. E. Hopper while she was President of Knowledge Foundry, a small company that developed traditional Web, social media, 3D, eBook and mobile sites. Remnants of the original website are still online. online


Knowledge Gates to Second Life (K-Gates, Alpha)

Knowledge Gates to Second Life
Knowledge Navigation & Exploration Centers
Ten + Sites, Many Regions in Linden Village, 100,000 + sq. m. (2006-Present)


The Knowledge Gates (K-Gates) were the Alpha version of the K-Places project. They were virtual sites located throughout an area of Second Life called Linden Village. They were called “Gates” due to their proximity to the Help and Orientation Islands that were used by new users of Second Life at that time. There were actually many K-Gates sites that evolved and expanded from 2006 to 2015, and some still exist today. You can find out more on the K-Gates page.

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The Knowledge Gates to SecondLife
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1.   Much of the content on this page was originally developed for a presentation at MIT in 2007.
The presentation was attended by Cory Ondrejka (SL Alt. Cory Linden, Chief Technology Officer@Second Life/Linden Lab) and John Lester (SL Alt. Pathfinder Linden, Second Life Lead Evangelist, Market Development, Boston Operations Director, Market Development in Education@Second Life/Linden Lab).
Hopper, M. E. (2007, April). The Knowledge Gates to SecondLife. Media in Transition 5 Conference: Creativity, Ownership and Collaboration in the Digital Age, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA.

2.   Knowledge Gates and Knowledge Objects were developed by Dr. M. E. Hopper while she was President of Knowledge Foundry, a small company that developed traditional Web, social media, 3D, eBook and mobile sites. Remnants of the original website are still online.


Knowledge Palace (K-Palace, Beta)

Knowledge Palace
Knowledge Navigation & Exploration Nexus
Terminous, Meins, Quentin, Samoa & Arcata, 40,160 sq. m. (2007-2009)
Papa, 19,152 sq. m., Riiki, 13,200 sq. m., Hina, 11,440 sq. m. (2011-2014)


Knowledge Palace (K-Palace) was the Beta version of the Knowledge Places (K-Places) project. This phase of the project involved revamping the hundreds of content specific objects and multitude of thematic spaces that were distributed across the K-Gates sites and integrating them into a single contiguous space. There were actually two K-Palace sites built at two different times, and they each spanned multiple regions. The first K-Palace was built in 2007, and it was laid out with individual levels dedicated to General Systems, Knowledge Forms and Knowledge Realms respectively.

Knowledge Palace, Cutaway

The second version of K-Palace was developed in 2011, and it was laid out differently than the first version. Rather than layering content layers, this version had a central castle where visitors could learn about the color schemes Systems themes used at the site. Then the Knowledge Forms were in dedicated spaces arranged around the castle. Then the Knowledge Realms were built on the “grounds” which were located on nearby dedicated sites.


Both K-Palace sites were located on Second Life’s original mainland continent named Sansara and showed up as one of the most visible features on the SecondLife map. You can find out more about this site on the K-Palace page.

1.   Some of the content on this page was originally developed for a presentation at MIT in 2009.
Hopper, M. E. (2009, April). Cosma: Constructing a Kingdom of Knowledge. Media in Transition 6 Conference: Stone and Papyrus, Storage and Transmission, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA.


Knowledge Paradise (K-Paradise, K-Places 1.0)

Knowledge Paradise
The Knowledge Kingdom
Cosma, Pyra, Gaia, Hydra, Aria, 327,680 sq. m. (2008-2014)


Knowledge Paradise (K-Paradise) was essentially version 1.0 of the K-Places project. Development of the five region estate began in 2008, and it was designed around a tropical resort metaphor. Creating K-Paradise involved updating the hundreds of content specific objects and multitude of thematic spaces that had been distributed throughout the K-Gates and K-Palace sites and then weaving them together into more elaborate, contiguous spaces. You can find out more about this site on the K-Paradise page.

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Cosma: Constructing a Kingdom of Knowledge
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1.   Much of the content on this page was originally developed for a presentation at MIT in 2009.
Hopper, M. E. (2009, April). Cosma: Constructing a Kingdom of Knowledge. Media in Transition 6 Conference: Stone and Papyrus, Storage and Transmission, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA.


Toy Worlds

A key goal of Cosma is to have a 3D interface to enable spatial Knowledge Navigation of the Knowledge Resources on this site. Toy Worlds are a new, fun way of accomplishing this goal.

They are literally “Toy Worlds” because they are dioramas created with dollhouse furniture and other miniature toys that are photographed with a RICOH THETA S 360° Camera. The resulting 360° photos are posted on the RoundMe 360° photo sharing service in order to overlay links to YouTube videos and web pages.

They are also figuratively “Toy Worlds” in that they are really just prototypes intended to serve as placeholders for more sophisticated Worlds created with advanced software such as Unity. The reason they do not exist yet is because there is no reasonably sophisticated platform for publishing sufficiently complex 3D worlds on the Web at the present time.

There are many Toy Worlds distributed across this site.

Find out more about Toy Worlds on this post


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