Quantum Computer

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General

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Quantum Computers: Qubits, Telecloning, Teleportation (Martindale’s Reference Desk)
Quantum Computing 101
Quantum computing (Category, Wikipedia)

Encyclopedia

Quantum computing is computing using quantum-mechanical phenomena, such as superposition and entanglement. A quantum computer is a device that performs quantum computing. They are different from binary digital electronic computers based on transistors. Whereas common digital computing requires that the data be encoded into binary digits (bits), each of which is always in one of two definite states (0 or 1), quantum computation uses quantum bits, which can be in superpositions of states. A quantum Turing machine is a theoretical model of such a computer, and is also known as the universal quantum computer. — Wikipedia

Encyclopædia Britannica

Introduction


Quantum computing 101 (Institute for Quantum Computing, University of Waterloo)
An Introduction to Quantum Computing, Without the Physics (Giacomo Nannicini, arXiv.org)
An Introduction to Quantum Computing (Noson S. Yanofsky, arXiv.org)

Search

WolframAlpha

Preservation

History

Timeline of Quantum Computers and the History of Quantum Computing (Quantum Computing 101)
Timeline of quantum computing (Wikipedia)

Library

WorldCat, Library of Congress, UPenn Online Books, Open Library

Participation

Education

MIT Quantum Practitioner Curriculum

Course

Quantum Computation (MIT Opencourseware)
OER Commons: Open Educational Resources

Community

Organization

ACM Special Interest Group on Algorithms and Computation Theory (SIGACT)

News

MIT News, Science Daily

Book

ISBNdb

Government

Document

USA.gov

Expression

Arts

Quantum Computing and Complexity in Art (Libby Heaney, Leonardo)

Future

Here’s What a World Powered by Quantum Computers Will Look Like (Dom Galeon and Kristin Houser, Futurism)

returntotop

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MIT News - Quantum computing MIT News is dedicated to communicating to the media and the public the news and achievements of the students, faculty, staff and the greater MIT community.


Quantum Computing News -- ScienceDaily Quantum Computing News. Read the latest about the development of quantum computers.

  • Electrons in rapid motion
    on February 14, 2020 at 6:47 pm

    Researchers observe quantum interferences in real-time using a new extreme ultra-violet light spectroscopy technique.

  • Deconstructing Schrödinger's cat
    on February 14, 2020 at 6:47 pm

    Many physicists have attempted to explain the problem of quantum superposition, as exemplified by Schrödinger's cat. Now a French theoretical physicist proposes a novel possible solution, which combines two different approaches and brings in universal gravitation.

  • Moving precision communication, metrology,...
    on February 13, 2020 at 7:16 pm

    Photonic integration has focused on communications applications traditionally fabricated on silicon chips, because these are less expensive and more easily manufactured, and researchers are exploring promising new waveguide platforms that provide these same benefits for applications that operate in the ultraviolet to the infrared spectrum. These platforms enable a broader range of applications, such as spectroscopy for chemical sensing, precision metrology and computation.

  • Fragile topology: Strange electron flow in future...
    on February 13, 2020 at 7:15 pm

    Crystalline materials known as topological insulators conduct surface current perfectly, except when they don't. In two new studies published in the journal Science, researchers explain how these 'fragile' poorly conducting topological states form, and how conductivity can be restored.

  • Using sound and light to generate ultra-fast data...
    on February 11, 2020 at 2:25 pm

    Researchers have made a breakthrough in the control of terahertz quantum cascade lasers, which could lead to the transmission of data at the rate of 100 gigabits per second -- around one thousand times quicker than a fast Ethernet operating at 100 megabits a second.