Terrestrial Planet

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Terrestrial Planet Mercury, Venus, Earth (Moon), Mars
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Oort Cloud Etc. Scholz’s Star
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General

Encyclopedia

Terrestrial planet, telluric planet, or rocky planet is a planet that is composed primarily of silicate rocks or metals. Within the Solar System, the terrestrial planets are the inner planets closest to the Sun, i.e. Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars. The terms “terrestrial planet” and “telluric planet” are derived from Latin words for Earth (Terra and Tellus), as these planets are, in terms of structure, “Earth-like”.

Terrestrial planets have a solid planetary surface, making them substantially different from the larger giant planets, which are composed mostly of some combination of hydrogen, helium, and water existing in various physical states. — Wikipedia

Encyclopædia Britannica

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Physics and Chemistry of the Terrestrial Planets (MIT)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories Phys.org internet news portal provides the latest news on science including: Physics, Nanotechnology, Life Sciences, Space Science, Earth Science, Environment, Health and Medicine.

  • Researcher sees potential for ancient life on...
    on July 15, 2019 at 2:08 pm

    Photos taken by the Mars Curiosity rover may show a desolate rocky landscape to some, but to Penn State researcher Christopher House, the photos show potential for ancient life. […]

  • Coral skeleton crystals record ocean acidification
    on July 11, 2019 at 4:17 pm

    The acidification of the oceans is recorded in the crystals of coral skeletons. This is a new tool for studying past environmental changes and combating climate change. Such is the main conclusion of a study led by the Spanish scientist Ismael Coronado Vila, from the Institute of Paleobiology in Warsaw (Poland). […]

  • Exploring a desert portal to other worlds
    on July 11, 2019 at 2:12 pm

    Ali Bramson clutched her neon pink umbrella as she trekked across the frozen lava that spilled from Amboy Crater in California's Mojave Desert. She and her fellow University of Arizona graduate students were tasked with identifying the boundaries of different eruptions of the extinct volcano, then unfurling their bright umbrellas to mark the spot. From an airplane overhead, her professor and another student photographed the sites to record the findings. […]

  • Upside-down, 3-D-printed skin and bone for Mars...
    on July 10, 2019 at 12:57 pm

    3-D printing human tissue could help keep astronauts healthy all the way to Mars. An ESA project has produced its first bioprinted skin and bone samples. […]

  • Why is the Earth's F/Cl ratio not chondritic?
    on July 1, 2019 at 1:19 pm

    Primitive chondrites, un-molten stony meteorites, are believed to be the building blocks of the Earth. Because terrestrial planets have experienced chemical differentiation in the core, mantle, and hydrosphere, the elemental abundance pattern of some elements at the planetary surface is not chondritic. In other words, the non-chondritic abundance pattern of elements on the planetary surface is a key to understanding the chemical differentiation processes of terrestrial planets. […]