Vertebrate

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vertebrate : any of a subphylum (Vertebrata) of chordates that comprises animals (such as mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and fishes) typically having a bony or cartilaginous spinal colum which replaces the notochord, a distinct head containing a brain which arises as an enlarged part of the nerve cord, and an internal usually bony skeleton and that includes some primitive forms (such as lampreys) in which the spinal column is absent and the notochord persists throughout life — Webster

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Vertebrates comprise all species of animals within the subphylum Vertebrata (chordates with backbones). Vertebrates represent the overwhelming majority of the phylum Chordata. Vertebrates include the jawless fish and the jawed vertebrates, which include the cartilaginous fishes (sharks, rays, and ratfish) and the bony fishes.

Extant vertebrates range in size from the frog species Paedophryne amauensis, at as little as 7.7 mm (0.30 in), to the blue whale, at up to 33 m (108 ft). Vertebrates make up less than five percent of all described animal species; the rest are invertebrates, which lack vertebral columns. — Wikipedia

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This walking fish may reveal how animals first took to land (Roni Dengler, Science Magazine)

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Monster Mystery Solved (Kate Golembiewski, Field Museum)
The Tully monster is a vertebrate (Victoria E. McCoy, et al., Nature)/a>
Mazon Creek Flora (Field Museum)
Tullimonstrum (Wikipedia)

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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories Phys.org internet news portal provides the latest news on science including: Physics, Nanotechnology, Life Sciences, Space Science, Earth Science, Environment, Health and Medicine.

  • Venom glands similar to those of snakes are found...
    on October 1, 2020 at 7:32 pm

    A group led by researchers at Butantan Institute in Brazil and supported by FAPESP has described for the first time the presence of venom glands in the mouth of an amphibian. The legless animal is a caecilian and lives underground. It has tooth-related glands that, when compressed during biting, release a secretion into its prey—earthworms, insect larvae, small amphibians and snakes, and even rodent pups. A paper reporting the study is published in iScience.

  • Amazon study shows big conservation gains...
    on October 1, 2020 at 6:00 pm

    A new study by an international team of environmental scientists in the Brazilian Amazon shows that redesigned conservation projects could deliver big gains for critical freshwater ecosystems—raising hopes for the futures of thousands of species.

  • Mud-slurping chinless ancestors had all the moves
    on October 1, 2020 at 3:00 pm

    A team of researchers, led by the University of Bristol, has revealed our most ancient ancestors were ecologically diverse, despite lacking jaws and paired fins.

  • Researchers hear more crickets and katydids...
    on October 1, 2020 at 2:50 pm

    The songs that crickets and katydids sing at night to attract mates can help in monitoring and mapping their populations, according to Penn State researchers, whose study of Orthoptera species in central Pennsylvania also shed light on these insects' habitat preferences.

  • In a field where smaller is better, researchers...
    on September 29, 2020 at 4:05 pm

    Researchers at the University of Bath in the UK and biopharma company UCB have found a way to produce miniaturized antibodies, opening the way for a potential new class of treatments for diseases.