Flower

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Top Places to see Flowers (World Love Flowers)

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Terrestrial (Earth)
Sphere Land, Ice, Water (Ocean), Air, Life (Cell, Gene, Microscope)
Ecosystem Forest, Grassland, Desert, Arctic, Aquatic

Tree of Life
Microorganism
Plant Flower, Tree
Animal
Invertebrate Octopus, Ant, Bee, Butterfly, Spider, Lobster
Vertebrate Fish, Seahorse, Ray, Shark, Frog, Turtle, Tortoise, Dinosaur
Bird, Ostrich, Owl, Crow, Parrot
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Monkey, Chimpanzee, Human

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General

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About Flowers

Dictionary

flower : : the specialized part of an angiospermous plant that occurs singly or in clusters, possesses whorls of often colorful petals or sepals, and bears the reproductive structures (such as stamens or pistils) involved in the development of seeds and fruit : blossom — Webster

OneLook, Free Dictionary, Wiktionary

Thesaurus

Roget’s II (Thesaurus.com), Merriam-Webster Thesaurus, Visuwords

Encyclopedia

Flower, sometimes known as a bloom or blossom, is the reproductive structure found in plants that are floral (plants of the division Magnoliophyta, also called angiosperms). The biological function of a flower is to effect reproduction, usually by providing a mechanism for the union of sperm with eggs. Flowers may facilitate outcrossing (fusion of sperm and eggs from different individuals in a population) or allow selfing (fusion of sperm and egg from the same flower). Some flowers produce diaspores without fertilization (parthenocarpy). Flowers contain sporangia and are the site where gametophytes develop. Many flowers have evolved to be attractive to animals, so as to cause them to be vectors for the transfer of pollen. After fertilization, the ovary of the flower develops into fruit containing seeds. In addition to facilitating the reproduction of flowering plants, flowers have long been admired and used by humans to beautify their environment, and also as objects of romance, ritual, religion, medicine and as a source of food. — Wikipedia

Encyclopædia Britannica

Introduction


Flowering Plants (OneZoom Tree of Life EXplorer)
Flowering Plants, Angiosperms (Tree of Life Web Project)

Search

WolframAlpha

Science


Preservation

History

Flower Meanings and Meanings of Flowers (About Flowers)
Language of flowers (Wikipedia)

Museum





Glass Flowers: The Ware Collection of Blaschka Glass Models of Plants (Harvard Museum of Natural History)
Glass Flowers (Wikipedia)

Library

WorldCat, Library of Congress, UPenn Online Books, Open Library

Participation

Education


Parts Of A Flower (Kids Biology)

Course



Crash Course Biology (YouTube Channel)


Plant Science: An Introduction to Botany (The Great Courses Plus)

OER Commons: Open Educational Resources

Community

Event

World Love Flowers: International guide for all your flower events and gardens

News

Flowers News (Buzzfeed), Phys.org, NPR Archives

Book

ISBNdb

Government

Document

USA.gov

Expression

Fun


Hobby



Flower Arrangements 101: A Crash Course for Easy and Elegant Florals (Meredith Swinehart, Gardenista)

Arts

From Van Gogh To Jeff Koons, Here’s a History of Flowers in Art (Annie Armstrong, Creators)

Visual Arts




Dance




Poem

OEDILF: The Omnificent English Dictionary In Limerick Form

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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories Phys.org internet news portal provides the latest news on science including: Physics, Nanotechnology, Life Sciences, Space Science, Earth Science, Environment, Health and Medicine.

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