Flower

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Top Places to see Flowers (World Love Flowers)

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Plant Flower, Tree
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General

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About Flowers

Dictionary

flower : : the specialized part of an angiospermous plant that occurs singly or in clusters, possesses whorls of often colorful petals or sepals, and bears the reproductive structures (such as stamens or pistils) involved in the development of seeds and fruit : blossom — Webster

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Encyclopedia

Flower, sometimes known as a bloom or blossom, is the reproductive structure found in plants that are floral (plants of the division Magnoliophyta, also called angiosperms). The biological function of a flower is to effect reproduction, usually by providing a mechanism for the union of sperm with eggs. Flowers may facilitate outcrossing (fusion of sperm and eggs from different individuals in a population) or allow selfing (fusion of sperm and egg from the same flower). Some flowers produce diaspores without fertilization (parthenocarpy). Flowers contain sporangia and are the site where gametophytes develop. Many flowers have evolved to be attractive to animals, so as to cause them to be vectors for the transfer of pollen. After fertilization, the ovary of the flower develops into fruit containing seeds. In addition to facilitating the reproduction of flowering plants, flowers have long been admired and used by humans to beautify their environment, and also as objects of romance, ritual, religion, medicine and as a source of food. — Wikipedia

Encyclopædia Britannica

Introduction


Flowering Plants (OneZoom Tree of Life EXplorer)
Flowering Plants, Angiosperms (Tree of Life Web Project)

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Science


Preservation

History

Flower Meanings and Meanings of Flowers (About Flowers)
Language of flowers (Wikipedia)

Museum





Glass Flowers: The Ware Collection of Blaschka Glass Models of Plants (Harvard Museum of Natural History)
Glass Flowers (Wikipedia)

Library

WorldCat, Library of Congress, UPenn Online Books, Open Library

Participation

Education


Parts Of A Flower (Kids Biology)

Course



Crash Course Biology (YouTube Channel)


Plant Science: An Introduction to Botany (The Great Courses Plus)

OER Commons: Open Educational Resources

Community

Event

World Love Flowers: International guide for all your flower events and gardens

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Flowers News (Buzzfeed), Phys.org, NPR Archives

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ISBNdb

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USA.gov

Expression

Fun


Hobby



Flower Arrangements 101: A Crash Course for Easy and Elegant Florals (Meredith Swinehart, Gardenista)

Arts

From Van Gogh To Jeff Koons, Here’s a History of Flowers in Art (Annie Armstrong, Creators)

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OEDILF: The Omnificent English Dictionary In Limerick Form

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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories Phys.org internet news portal provides the latest news on science including: Physics, Nanotechnology, Life Sciences, Space Science, Earth Science, Environment, Health and Medicine.

  • Researchers analyze artifacts to better...
    on December 11, 2019 at 3:58 pm

    New research from anthropologists at McMaster University and California State University, San Bernardino (CSUSB), is shedding light on ancient dietary practices, the evolution of agricultural societies and ultimately, how plants have become an important element of the modern diet.

  • 480-million-year-old fossils reveal sea lilies'...
    on December 9, 2019 at 5:00 pm

    Sea lilies, despite their name, aren't plants. They're animals related to starfish and sea urchins, with long feathery arms resting atop a stalk that keeps them anchored to the ocean floor. Sea lilies have been around for at least 480 million years—they first evolved hundreds of millions of years before the dinosaurs. For nearly two centuries, scientists have thought about how modern sea lilies evolved from their ancient ancestors. In a new study in the Journal of Paleontology, […]

  • How do you cultivate a healthy plant microbiome?
    on December 6, 2019 at 5:49 pm

    Scientists are homing in on what a healthy human microbiome looks like, mapping the normal bacteria that live in and on the healthy human body. But what about a healthy plant microbiome?

  • Discovery of genes involved in the biosynthesis...
    on December 6, 2019 at 5:47 pm

    St. John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum) is an ancient medicinal plant. It is known for the mild antidepressant properties of its bioactive compound hypericin, which is produced in the dark glands of the plant. By investigating the flowers of St. John's Wort, researchers identified genes involved in dark gland development and the biosynthesis of hypericin. The findings were published in the Plant Biotechnology Journal.

  • Breakthrough in battle against invasive plants
    on December 6, 2019 at 2:24 pm

    Plants that can "bounce back" after disturbances like plowing, flooding or drought are the most likely to be "invasive" if they're moved to new parts of the world, scientists say.

  • Academy scientists describe 71 new species in 2019
    on December 5, 2019 at 9:39 pm

    In 2019, researchers at the California Academy of Sciences added 71 new plant and animal species to our family tree, enriching our understanding of Earth's complex web of life and strengthening our ability to make informed conservation decisions. The new species include 17 fish, 15 geckos, eight flowering plants, six sea slugs, five arachnids, four eels, three ants, three skinks, two skates, two wasps, two mosses, two corals, and two lizards. More than a dozen Academy scientists—along […]

  • How flowers adapt to their pollinators
    on December 5, 2019 at 6:17 pm

    Flowering plants are characterized by an astonishing diversity of flowers of different shapes and sizes. This diversity has arisen in adaptation to selection imposed by different pollinators including, among others, bees, flies, butterflies, hummingbirds, bats or rodents. Although several studies have documented that pollinators can impose strong selection pressures on flowers, our understanding of how flowers diversify remains fragmentary. For example, does the entire flower adapt to a […]

  • First 'lab in a field' experiment reveals a...
    on December 5, 2019 at 4:00 pm

    Pioneering experiments using heated field plots to test the responses of crops to temperature have revealed an unexpected plus side of climate change for farmers.

  • Scientists: Insect populations are...
    on December 5, 2019 at 3:00 pm

    Are you planning a big garden clean-up this summer, or stocking up on fly spray to keep bugs at bay? Before you do, it's worth considering the damage you might cause to the insects we share the planet with.

  • Gene expression regulation in Chinese cabbage...
    on December 5, 2019 at 2:40 pm

    Doctoral student Ayasha Akter (Kobe University's Graduate School of Agricultural Science) and technical staff member Satoshi Takahashi (from the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science) have revealed the important role played by the histone modification H3K27me3 in regulating gene expression in Chinese cabbage. In addition, they illuminated the role of H3K27me3 in vernalization—a vital process for enabling Brassica rapa vegetables, such as Chinese cabbage, to flower.