Flower

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Top Places to see Flowers (World Love Flowers)

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Plant Flower, Tree
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General

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About Flowers

Dictionary

flower : : the specialized part of an angiospermous plant that occurs singly or in clusters, possesses whorls of often colorful petals or sepals, and bears the reproductive structures (such as stamens or pistils) involved in the development of seeds and fruit : blossom — Webster

OneLook, Free Dictionary, Wiktionary

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Encyclopedia

Flower, sometimes known as a bloom or blossom, is the reproductive structure found in plants that are floral (plants of the division Magnoliophyta, also called angiosperms). The biological function of a flower is to effect reproduction, usually by providing a mechanism for the union of sperm with eggs. Flowers may facilitate outcrossing (fusion of sperm and eggs from different individuals in a population) or allow selfing (fusion of sperm and egg from the same flower). Some flowers produce diaspores without fertilization (parthenocarpy). Flowers contain sporangia and are the site where gametophytes develop. Many flowers have evolved to be attractive to animals, so as to cause them to be vectors for the transfer of pollen. After fertilization, the ovary of the flower develops into fruit containing seeds. In addition to facilitating the reproduction of flowering plants, flowers have long been admired and used by humans to beautify their environment, and also as objects of romance, ritual, religion, medicine and as a source of food. — Wikipedia

Encyclopædia Britannica

Introduction


Flowering Plants (OneZoom Tree of Life EXplorer)
Flowering Plants, Angiosperms (Tree of Life Web Project)

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Science


Preservation

History

Flower Meanings and Meanings of Flowers (About Flowers)
Language of flowers (Wikipedia)

Museum





Glass Flowers: The Ware Collection of Blaschka Glass Models of Plants (Harvard Museum of Natural History)
Glass Flowers (Wikipedia)

Library

WorldCat, Library of Congress, UPenn Online Books, Open Library

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Education


Parts Of A Flower (Kids Biology)

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Crash Course Biology (YouTube Channel)


Plant Science: An Introduction to Botany (The Great Courses Plus)

OER Commons: Open Educational Resources

Community

Event

World Love Flowers: International guide for all your flower events and gardens

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Flowers News (Buzzfeed), Phys.org, NPR Archives

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ISBNdb

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USA.gov

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Fun


Hobby



Flower Arrangements 101: A Crash Course for Easy and Elegant Florals (Meredith Swinehart, Gardenista)

Arts

From Van Gogh To Jeff Koons, Here’s a History of Flowers in Art (Annie Armstrong, Creators)

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OEDILF: The Omnificent English Dictionary In Limerick Form

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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories Phys.org internet news portal provides the latest news on science including: Physics, Nanotechnology, Life Sciences, Space Science, Earth Science, Environment, Health and Medicine.

  • Massive damage of rare plants probed at Nevada...
    on September 18, 2020 at 8:10 pm

    State and federal authorities are investigating the mysterious loss of a significant swath of a rare desert wildflower that's being considered for federal protection at a contentious mine site in Nevada with some of the largest untapped lithium deposits in the world.

  • Botanists unearth new 'vampire plant' in UK...
    on September 18, 2020 at 1:20 pm

    ,Scientists Dr. Chris Thorogood at the University of Oxford Botanic Garden, and Dr. Fred Rumsey at London's Natural History Museum have just described a new form of a strange parasitic "vampire" plant known as "common broomrape."

  • Monarch butterflies' spectacular migration is at...
    on September 18, 2020 at 1:17 pm

    One of nature's epic events is underway: Monarch butterflies' fall migration. Departing from all across the United States and Canada, the butterflies travel up to 2,500 miles to cluster at the same locations in Mexico or along the Pacific Coast where their great-grandparents spent the previous winter.

  • 'Cellular compass' guides stem cell division in...
    on September 17, 2020 at 8:10 pm

    The stem cells tasked with creating and maintaining biological tissues have a difficult job. They have to precisely divide to form new specialized cells, which are destined to different fates even though they contain identical DNA. An obvious question then is: How do the cells divide in all the right ways to produce a healthy tissue? This was the grand motivating question for Andrew Muroyama, a postdoctoral scholar in the lab of Stanford University biologist Dominique Bergmann, as he monitored […]

  • Scientists 'scent train' honeybees to boost...
    on September 17, 2020 at 3:00 pm

    If you want a dog to hunt something down, it helps to let them sniff an item to pick up the scent. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on September 17 have found that scent training honeybees in the hive might work in a similar way—and that this approach could make bees more efficient in pollinating a desired crop. The findings show that honeybees given food scented with odors that mimicked sunflowers supported a significant increase in sunflower crop production.

  • Study show what makes plant cell walls compress...
    on September 17, 2020 at 1:44 pm

    New findings about the building blocks of plant fibers open the door to advances in material engineering as well as food and agriculture, a Swedish-Australian research collaboration reported. The findings, published today in Nature Communications, identify the individual mechanical functions of wood hemicelluloses in plant cell walls for the first time.

  • Plants produce nutrient-rich substances for...
    on September 17, 2020 at 1:39 pm

    A multidisciplinary team of researchers from the University of Valencia (UV), the Valencian Institute of Agricultural Research (IVIA) and Rutgers University (RU) has just demonstrated that guttation, small watery drops exudated from the margins of plants leaves, is a nutrient-rich food source for beneficial insects (pollinators or those used for biological pest control). The study has been published today in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

  • A new species of milkweed subfamily found in...
    on September 15, 2020 at 11:20 am

    Hoya is a genus in the Asclepiadoideae, the milkweed subfamily of the flowering-plant family Apocynaceae. In the past decade, 15 new Hoya were reported in China. Together with the newly reported species and those recorded in the Flora of China, there are approximately 47 species and one variety of Hoya currently recognized in China.

  • Heated rivalries for pollinators among arctic...
    on September 11, 2020 at 2:55 pm

    Insect pollination is as important to Arctic plants as it is to plants further south. When flowers abound, the plants have to compete for pollinators. Researchers at the University of Helsinki reveal that higher temperatures cause the flowering periods of different plant species to pile up in time. As a consequence, climate change may affect the competitive relationships of plants.

  • Putting a future avocado apocalypse on ice
    on September 10, 2020 at 4:20 pm

    The supply of smashed 'avo' is secure for generations after world-first research cryopreserved the tips of avocado shoots and then revived them to create healthy plants.