Fish

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Caranx (Fishbase)
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FishBase (R. Froese & D. Pauly)
Fish Portal (Wikipeda)

Dictionary

fish : any of numerous cold-blooded strictly aquatic craniate vertebrates that include the bony fishes and usually the cartilaginous and jawless fishes and that have typically an elongated somewhat spindle-shaped body terminating in a broad caudal (see caudal 2) fin, limbs in the form of fins when present at all, and a 2-chambered heart by which blood is sent through thoracic gills to be oxygenated — Webster

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Fish are the gill-bearing aquatic craniate animals that lack limbs with digits. They form a sister group to the tunicates, together forming the olfactores. Included in this definition are the living hagfish, lampreys, and cartilaginous and bony fish as well as various extinct related groups. Tetrapods emerged within lobe-finned fishes, so cladistically they are fish as well. However, traditionally fish are rendered paraphyletic by excluding the tetrapods (i.e., the amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals which all descended from within the same ancestry). Because in this manner the term “fish” is defined negatively as a paraphyletic group, it is not considered a formal taxonomic grouping in systematic biology. The traditional term pisces (also ichthyes) is considered a typological, but not a phylogenetic classification. — Wikipedia

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Ichthyology, also known as fish science, is the branch of zoology devoted to the study of fish. This includes bony fish (Osteichthyes), cartilaginous fish (Chondrichthyes), and jawless fish (Agnatha). While a large number of species have been discovered, approximately 250 new species are officially described by science each year. According to FishBase, 33,400 species of fish had been described by October 2016. — Wikipedia

Encyclopædia Britannica





Flathead catfish (Fishbase)
Flathead catfish (Wikipedia)



What This Walking Fish Can Teach Us About Evolution (National Geographic)

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Fish News -- ScienceDaily All about fish. Current research in marine biology including fish habitats, aquaculture, speciation, deep sea fish and more.

  • American lobster, sea scallop habitat could shift...
    on June 5, 2020 at 5:24 pm

    Researchers have projected significant changes in the habitat of commercially important American lobster and sea scallops on the Northeast U.S. continental shelf. They used a suite of models to estimate how species will react as waters warm. The researchers suggest that American lobster will move further offshore and sea scallops will shift to the north in the coming decades.

  • Measuring Atlantic bluefin tuna with a drone
    on June 5, 2020 at 4:15 pm

    Researchers have used an unmanned aerial system (or drone) to gather data on schooling juvenile Atlantic bluefin tuna in the Gulf of Maine. This pilot study tested whether a drone could keep up with the tuna while also taking photographs that captured physical details of this fast-moving fish.

  • Mangrove trees won't survive sea-level rise by...
    on June 4, 2020 at 7:21 pm

    Mangrove trees -- valuable coastal ecosystems found in Florida and other warm climates - won't survive sea-level rise by 2050 if greenhouse gas emissions aren't reduced, according to a new study. Using sediment data from the last 10,000 years, an international team estimated the chances of mangrove survival based on rates of sea-level rise.

  • Climate change an imminent threat to glass sponge...
    on June 4, 2020 at 1:56 pm

    Warming ocean temperatures and acidification drastically reduce the skeletal strength and filter-feeding capacity of glass sponges, according to new research. The findings indicate that ongoing climate change could have serious, irreversible impacts on the sprawling glass sponge reefs of the Pacific Northwest and associated biodiversity -- the only known reefs of their kind in the world.

  • Larger streams are critical for wild brook trout...
    on June 3, 2020 at 11:44 pm

    The Latin name for brook trout -- Salvelinus fontinalis -- means 'speckled fish of the fountains,' but a new study suggests, for the first time, that the larger streams and rivers those fountains, or headwaters, flow into may be just as important to the brook trout.


Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories Phys.org internet news portal provides the latest news on science including: Physics, Nanotechnology, Life Sciences, Space Science, Earth Science, Environment, Health and Medicine.

  • PFAS present throughout the Yadkin-Pee Dee river...
    on June 5, 2020 at 9:40 pm

    Researchers from North Carolina State University have found per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in every step of the Yadkin-Pee Dee River food chain, even though the river does not have a known industrial input of these compounds. The study examined the entire aquatic ecosystem for PFAS compounds and identified strong links between ecosystem groups that lead to biomagnification, the process that leads to greater concentrations of these substances in animals that sit higher on the food […]

  • Researchers help bring biofriendly materials to...
    on June 5, 2020 at 5:32 pm

    The contributions of researchers from The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) have yielded the first indication that carbon quantum dots, a class of nanoparticles, can be utilized to combat neurological disorders, according to a paper published in the journal Processes as part its special issue on protein biosynthesis and drug design and delivery.

  • American lobster, sea scallop habitat could shift...
    on June 5, 2020 at 5:30 pm

    Researchers have projected significant changes in the habitat of commercially important American lobster and sea scallops on the Northeast U.S. continental shelf. They used a suite of models to estimate how species will react as waters warm. The researchers suggest that American lobster will move further offshore and sea scallops will shift to the north in the coming decades.

  • Measuring Atlantic bluefin tuna with a drone
    on June 5, 2020 at 4:27 pm

    Researchers have used an unmanned aerial system (or drone) to gather data on schooling juvenile Atlantic bluefin tuna in the Gulf of Maine.

  • It's time to rethink the disrupted U.S. food...
    on June 5, 2020 at 2:50 pm

    The COVID-19 pandemic and resulting economic shutdowns have severely disrupted and spotlighted weaknesses in the U.S. food system. Farmers, food distributors and government agencies are working to reconfigure supply chains so that food can get to where it's needed. But there is a hidden, long-neglected dimension that should also be addressed as the nation rebuilds from the current crisis.