Philosophy

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Spotlight


Philosophy Tube

Related

Pages

Theory Philosophy, System

Subpages

Metaphysics, Logic, Epistemology, Ethics, Aesthetics

Resources

These are organized by a classification scheme developed exclusively for Cosma. More…

General

Portal

PhilPapers (David Bourget and David Chalmers, General Editors)
Recommended Resources in Philosophy (The American Philosophical Association
Philosophy portal (Wikipedia)

Dictionary

philosophy : (1) pursuit of wisdom (2) a search for a general understanding of values and reality by chiefly speculative rather than observational means (3) an analysis of the grounds of and concepts expressing fundamental beliefs (4) a system of philosophical concepts (5) a theory underlying or regarding a sphere of activity or thought (6) the most basic beliefs, concepts, and attitudes of an individual or group — Webster

Dictionary of Philosophical Terms and Names (Garth Kemerling, Philosophy Pages)
Philosophy Dictionaries and Glossaries (Peter Suber, Guide to Philosophy on the Internet)

OneLook, Free Dictionary, Wiktionary, Urban Dictionary

Thesaurus

Roget’s II (Thesaurus.com), Merriam-Webster Thesaurus, Visuwords

Encyclopedia

Philosophy is the study of general and fundamental problems, such as those connected with existence, knowledge, values, reason, mind, and language. It is distinguished from other ways of addressing such problems by its critical, generally systematic approach and its reliance on rational argument. — Wikipedia

Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy
The Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Encyclopædia Britannica

Introduction


What is Philosophy? (Steve Palmquist, The Tree of Philosophy)

Outline

An Outline Of Philosophy (Bertrand Russell, Internet Archive)
Outline of Philosophy (Wikipedia)

Search

Philosophy (Search Engine Guide), WolframAlpha, DuckDuckGo

Foundation

Philosophy


The Philosophy of Philosophy (Timothy Williamson)
Philosophical research online: Metaphilosophy (Jonathan Ichikawa, PhilPapers)
Contemporary Metaphilosophy (Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy)
Metaphilosophy (Wikipedia)

System

What Constitutes a Philosophical System? (Tim Lacy, Society for US Intellectual History)

Preservation

History



Crash Course Philosophy (Hank Green)

History of Philosophy without any gaps (Peter Adamson, History of Philosophy)
A History of Philosophy YouTube Channel (Arthur Holmes, Wheaton College)
Ancient, Medieval, Oriental Philosophy arranged according to Dewey Decimal Classification (Bill Lawson)
History of Philosophy (Wikipedia) (Categories)

Quotation

Philosophy Quotations (Peter Suber, Guide to Philosophy on the Internet)
Quotations Page

Museum

The Philosophy Chamber: Art and Science in Harvard’s Teaching Cabinet, 1766–1820 (Harvard Art Museums)
What Would Be in a Philosophy Museum? (Justin Weinberg, Daily Nous)
At Philosophy Museum, Please Feed the Mind (The New York Times)

Library

A Guide to Philosophy in the Library of Congress Classification (John R. Shook)
Harvard Robbins Library of Philosophy
WorldCat, Library of Congress, UPenn Online Books, Open Library

Participation

Education


Teaching Children Philosophy
Philosophy for Children
Center for Philosophy for Children (University of Washington)

Teaching Philosophy (PhilPapers)
Philosophy Courses, Syllabi, Teaching & Learning (Peter Suber, Guide to Philosophy on the Internet)
Study Guide for Students of Philosophy (Garth Kemerling, Philosophy Pages)

Course

The Tree of Philosophy: A Course of Introductory Lectures (Stephen Palmquist)
A History of Ideas: A 60-part radio series (The Open University)
Philosophy Podcasts (LearnOutLoud.com)
Linguistics and Philosophy (MIT Open Courseware)

Community

Occupation

Career Resources (American Philosophical Association)
Jobs for Philosophers (American Philosophical Association)
Jobs for Philosophers (PhilJobs)
Jobs (Peter Suber, Guide to Philosophy on the Internet)

Event

PhilEvents (Conferences, CFPs, and seminars in philosophy)

Organization

Philosophical Associations and Societies (Peter Suber, Guide to Philosophy on the Internet)
Philosophy Associations and Societies (American Philosophical Association)
American Philosophical Association
Society for Applied Philosophy
Philosophy Documentation Center

Blog

Blogs and Podcasts (American Philosophical Association)
Philosophical Weblogs Directory (David Chalmers)
Daily Nous (Justin Weinberg)
The Philosopher’s Zone (Joe Gelonesi)

Forum

PHILOS-L Listserv

News

Journal of the American Philosophical Association
Philosophical research online (David Bourget and David Chalmers, General Editors, PhilPapers)
Philosophers’ Imprint (University of Michigan Library)
The Philosophers’ Magazine
Philosophy News

Book

Philosophy Bookshelf (Project Gutenberg), ISBNdb

Government

Document

USA.gov

Expression

Fun




Three Minute Philosophy (YouTube Channel)

The Philosophical Lexicon (Daniel Dennett and Asbjørn Steglich-Petersen)
The Causes of death of philosophers (D. H. Mellor)
Philosophy Humor Links (Peter Suber, Guide to Philosophy on the Internet)
Philosophical Humor (David Chalmers, Philosophy Pages)

Game

Philospohy Games (The Philosophers’ Magazine)

Arts

Philsophy of Art vs. Aesthetics (Christopher S. Nwodo, The British Journal of Aesthetics)

Fiction

Worlds Of Speculative Fiction: Philosophical Themes (Gregory B. Sadler, YouTube Channel)

Poem

OEDILF: The Omnificent English Dictionary In Limerick Form

returntotop

More…

  • Ozgen, Eren : Unilateral Transfers and a...
    on April 2, 2020 at 9:16 pm

    _Journal of Ayn Rand Studies_ 8 (2):285 - 290. 2007 Kathleen Touchstone's Then Athena Said: Unilateral Transfers and the Transformation of Objectivist Ethics is an intriguing book on unilateral transfers within the context of Objectivism. Touchstone examines Rand's primary social ethic, the Trader Principle—the bilateral exchange of value between independent equals. In reconsidering Rand's thoughts, she raises many arguments and provides thought-provoking insights especially on charity, […]

  • Lu, Chenguang :...
    on April 2, 2020 at 9:16 pm

    It proposes the Need Aesthetics. It uses the needing relationship to explain Human and birds' evolution of beauty sense, bird's colorful plumage and sexual selection.(direct link)

  • Ingham, Sean & Wiens, David : Defining...
    on April 2, 2020 at 9:16 pm

    Political scientists' failure to pay careful attention to the content (as opposed to the operationalization) of their chosen definition of `democracy' can make them liable to draw invalid inferences from their empirical research. With this problem in mind, we argue for the following proposition: if one wishes to conduct empirical research that contributes to an existing conversation about democracy, then one must choose a definition of `democracy' that picks out the topic of that conversation […]

  • Ingham, Sean & Wiens, David : Defining...
    on April 2, 2020 at 9:16 pm

    Political scientists' failure to pay careful attention to the content (as opposed to the operationalization) of their chosen definition of `democracy' can make them liable to draw invalid inferences from their empirical research. With this problem in mind, we argue for the following proposition: if one wishes to conduct empirical research that contributes to an existing conversation about democracy, then one must choose a definition of `democracy' that picks out the topic of that conversation […]

  • Schubert, Karsten : Crying for Repression:...
    on April 2, 2020 at 9:16 pm

    _Critical Legal Thinking_. 2020 We live in very Foucauldian times, as the many think-pieces published on biopolitics and COVID-19 show. Yet what is remarkable—biopolitically—about the current situation has gone largely unnoticed: We are witnessing a new form of biopolitics today that could be termed populist biopolitics. Awareness of this populist biopolitics helps illuminate what is needed today: democratic biopolitics.(direct link)


Philosophers' Imprint Philosophers' Imprint

  • The General Theory of Second Best Is More General...
    by David Wiens on January 1, 2020 at 12:00 am

    Lipsey and Lancaster's ``general theory of second best'' is widely thought to have significant implications for applied theorizing about the institutions and policies that most effectively implement abstract normative principles. It is also widely thought to have little significance for theorizing about which abstract normative principles we ought to implement. Contrary to this conventional wisdom, I show how the second-best theorem can be extended to myriad domains beyond applied normative […]

  • Ability and Possibility
    by Wolfgang Schwarz on January 1, 2020 at 12:00 am

    According to the classical quantificational analysis of modals, an agent has the ability to perform an act iff (roughly) relevant facts about the agent and her environment are compatible with her performing the act. The analysis faces a number of problems, many of which can be traced to the fact that it takes even accidental performance of an act as proof of the relevant ability. I argue that ability statements are systematically ambiguous: on one reading, accidental performance really is […]

  • On the Open-Endedness of Logical Space
    by Agustín Rayo on January 1, 2020 at 12:00 am

    Modal logicism is the view that a metaphysical possibility is just a non-absurd way for the world to be. I argue that modal logicists should see metaphysical possibility as "open ended'': any given possibilities can be used to characterize further possibilities. I then develop a formal framework for modal languages that is a good fit for the modal logicist and show that it delivers some attractive results.


Philosophy News Think About It

  • Gödel’s Incompleteness Theorems
    by paulp@philosophynews.com on April 2, 2020 at 8:42 pm

    [Revised entry by Panu Raatikainen on April 2, 2020. Changes to: Bibliography] Godel's two incompleteness theorems are among the most important results in modern logic, and have deep implications for various issues. They concern the limits of provability in formal axiomatic theories. The first incompleteness theorem states that in any consistent formal system F within which a certain amount of arithmetic can be carried out, there are statements of the language of F which can neither be proved […]

  • Fred is 14. Would you agree that Fred isn't in...
    by paulp@philosophynews.com on April 2, 2020 at 4:37 pm

    Read another response about Mathematics Mathematics Share Fred is 14. Would you agree that Fred isn't in the set of people aged less than 15 because he's 14, he's in the set of people aged less than 15 because he's less than 15? (It doesn't matter what his age is, as long as he's less than 15.) Continue reading . . . News source: AskPhilosophers Questions Click the title to visit philosophynews.com for more

  • Re-reading Camus’s The Plague in pandemic times
    by paulp@philosophynews.com on April 2, 2020 at 2:34 pm

    Sometime in the 1940s in the sleepy colonial city of Oran, in French occupied Algeria, there was an outbreak of plague. First rats died, then people. Within days, the entire city was quarantined: it was impossible to get out, and no one could get in. This is the fictional setting for Albert Camus’s second most famous novel, The Plague (1947). And yes, there are some similarities to our current […]

  • Donald Trump’s insult politics
    by paulp@philosophynews.com on April 2, 2020 at 10:29 am

    Political commentators and satirists love to mock Donald Trump’s verbal gaffs, his simplified vocabulary and vague, boastful speech. But if you judge his oratory by its effect on the audience, Donald Trump’s rhetoric, particularly with large crowds of enthusiastic supporters, is undeniably effective. People have studied the art of rhetoric for millennia – so how does a style that runs counter to all established advice work so well? His use of simple vocabulary and repetition […]

  • From a small corner of Cambridge, 3
    by paulp@philosophynews.com on April 2, 2020 at 8:26 am

    Some quite beautiful spring weather in recent days, and it’s rather frustrating to be confined to home. But while our whatever-it-has-been bug still hangs around, we should do what we can not to spread it. At least we are no longer feeling dog-tired much of the day, and want to get out. Tomorrow maybe. If we survive the excitement of a Waitrose delivery later. Decorating plans are on hold. Guess who left it too late to order a delivery of what we needed. Which is a very small example […]