Astronomical Instrument

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General

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Observational astronomy is a division of astronomy that is concerned with recording data about the observable universe, in contrast with theoretical astronomy, which is mainly concerned with calculating the measurable implications of physical models. It is the practice and study of observing celestial objects with the use of telescopes and other astronomical instruments.

Galileo Galilei turned a telescope to the heavens and recorded what he saw. Since that time, observational astronomy has made steady advances with each improvement in a variety astronomical instruments and related methods. — Wikipedia

Observational Astronomy (Eric Weisstein’s World of Astronomy, Wolfram Research)
Observatories & Telescopes (Wolfram Alpha)
Encyclopædia Britannica

Astronomical Instruments, Category (Wikipedia)
Astronomical Instruments, List (Wikipedia)

Introduction

Australian Astronomical Observatory (AAO)

Preservation

History

Galileo and the telescope (The Science Geek)
The History of Astronomy (Ask an Astronomer, Cornell University)

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Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

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Telescopes (NASA.Gov)
Observational Astronomy (Ask an Astronomer, Cornell University)
Telescopes (Ask an Astronomer, Cornell University)
Telescopes (Cosmos4Kids)

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Crash Course Astronomy (YouTube)

OER Commons: Open Educational Resources

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Careers in Astronomy (Ask an Astronomer, Cornell University)

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Sky & Telescope, ScienceDaily, Phys.org, NPR Archives

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Celestial News & Events – Sky & Telescope The essential guide to astronomy

  • This Week's Sky at a Glance, Sept. 24 – Oct. 2
    by Alan MacRobert on September 24, 2021 at 1:48 pm

    Jupiter and Saturn shine in the south-southeast at dusk, Venus low in the southwest. They're all close to the ecliptic, so a straight line from Jupiter through Saturn points almost exactly to Venus. Don't believe it? Stretch a string tightly between your hands wide apart, hold it up to the three planets, and see for yourself! The post This Week's Sky at a Glance, Sept. 24 – Oct. 2 appeared first on Sky & Telescope.

  • This Week's Sky at a Glance, September 17 – 25
    by Alan MacRobert on September 17, 2021 at 2:00 pm

    The waxing gibbous Moon shines with Jupiter and Saturn on its way to full. And as summer turns to fall, Deneb replaces Vega as the zenith star after dusk. The post This Week's Sky at a Glance, September 17 – 25 appeared first on Sky & Telescope.

  • Asteroid Pallas Makes a Point in Pisces
    by Bob King on September 15, 2021 at 2:07 pm

    Spice up your fall observing with a dash of Pallas and nibble of Neptune. Both planet and asteroid are easy to spot in a small telescope. The post Asteroid Pallas Makes a Point in Pisces appeared first on Sky & Telescope.

  • Amateurs Spot New Impact Flash at Jupiter
    by Bob King on September 14, 2021 at 6:26 pm

    An amateur astronomer has discovered a possible new impact flash in Jupiter's equatorial region. Observers may yet see the dark impact scar. The post Amateurs Spot New Impact Flash at Jupiter appeared first on Sky & Telescope.

  • This Week's Sky at a Glance, September 10 – 18
    by Alan MacRobert on September 10, 2021 at 9:07 am

    The evening Moon steps eastward over Scorpius as it waxes through first quarter. All four giant planets await your telescope in early to late evening. The post This Week's Sky at a Glance, September 10 – 18 appeared first on Sky & Telescope.


Space Telescopes News -- ScienceDaily Space Telescopes. Astronomy articles and pictures from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and Chandra X-Ray Telescope and many other leading astronomy institutes from around the world.

  • Gamma rays and neutrinos from mellow supermassive...
    on September 24, 2021 at 2:43 pm

    The Universe is filled with energetic particles, such as X rays, gamma rays, and neutrinos. However, most of the high-energy cosmic particles' origins remain unexplained.

  • Hubble finds early, massive galaxies running on...
    on September 22, 2021 at 4:19 pm

    When the universe was about 3 billion years old, just 20% of its current age, it experienced the most prolific period of star birth in its history. But when NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in northern Chile gazed toward cosmic objects in this period, they found something odd: six early, massive, 'dead' galaxies that had run out of the cold hydrogen gas needed to make stars. Without more fuel for star formation, these galaxies were […]

  • Unveiling galaxies at cosmic dawn that were...
    on September 22, 2021 at 4:18 pm

    While investigating the data of young, distant galaxies observed with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, astronomers noticed unexpected emissions coming from seemingly empty regions in space that, a global research team confirmed, came actually from two hitherto undiscovered galaxies heavily obscured by cosmic dust. This discovery suggests that numerous such galaxies might still be hidden in the early Universe, many more than researchers were expecting.

  • Astrophysicists solve 'empty sky' gamma-ray...
    on September 20, 2021 at 3:14 pm

    Star-forming galaxies are responsible for creating gamma-rays that until now had not been associated with a known origin.

  • Part of the Universe’s missing matter found
    on September 16, 2021 at 3:46 pm

    Galaxies can receive and exchange matter with their external environment thanks to the galactic winds created by stellar explosions. An international research team has now mapped a galactic wind for the first time. This unique observation helped to reveal where some of the Universe's missing matter is located and to observe the formation of a nebula around a galaxy.


Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories Phys.org internet news portal provides the latest news on science including: Physics, Nanotechnology, Life Sciences, Space Science, Earth Science, Environment, Health and Medicine.

  • This is what it looks like when a black hole...
    on September 17, 2021 at 11:15 am

    While black holes and toddlers don't seem to have much in common, they are remarkably similar in one aspect: Both are messy eaters, generating ample evidence that a meal has taken place.

  • A six-year search of the outer solar system turns...
    on September 16, 2021 at 11:53 am

    In the near future, astronomers will benefit from the presence of next-generation telescopes like the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and the Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope (RST). At the same time, improved data mining and machine learning techniques will also allow astronomers to get more out of existing instruments. In the process, they hope to finally answer some of the most burning questions about the cosmos.

  • NASA provides laser for LISA mission
    on September 15, 2021 at 2:20 pm

    Finding the biggest collisions in the universe takes time, patience, and super steady lasers.

  • Astrophysicists identify large reservoirs of...
    on September 15, 2021 at 2:00 pm

    Analysis of unique fingerprints in light emitted from material surrounding young stars has revealed "significant reservoirs" of large organic molecules necessary to form the basis of life, say researchers.

  • Cosmic dawn holds the answers to many of...
    on September 15, 2021 at 11:57 am

    Thanks to the most advanced telescopes, astronomers today can see what objects looked like 13 billion years ago, roughly 800 million years after the Big Bang. Unfortunately, they are still unable to pierce the veil of the cosmic Dark Ages, a period that lasted from 370,000 to 1 billion years after the Big Bang, where the Universe was shrowded with light-obscuring neutral hydrogen. Because of this, our telescopes cannot see when the first stars and galaxies formed—ca. 100 to 500 million years […]