Astronomical Instrument

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General

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Observational astronomy is a division of astronomy that is concerned with recording data about the observable universe, in contrast with theoretical astronomy, which is mainly concerned with calculating the measurable implications of physical models. It is the practice and study of observing celestial objects with the use of telescopes and other astronomical instruments.

Galileo Galilei turned a telescope to the heavens and recorded what he saw. Since that time, observational astronomy has made steady advances with each improvement in a variety astronomical instruments and related methods. — Wikipedia

Observational Astronomy (Eric Weisstein’s World of Astronomy, Wolfram Research)
Observatories & Telescopes (Wolfram Alpha)
Encyclopædia Britannica

Astronomical Instruments, Category (Wikipedia)
Astronomical Instruments, List (Wikipedia)

Introduction



Australian Astronomical Observatory (AAO)

Preservation

History




Galileo and the telescope (The Science Geek)
The History of Astronomy (Ask an Astronomer, Cornell University)

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Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

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WorldCat, Library of Congress, UPenn Online Books, Open Library

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Telescopes (NASA.Gov)
Observational Astronomy (Ask an Astronomer, Cornell University)
Telescopes (Ask an Astronomer, Cornell University)
Telescopes (Cosmos4Kids)

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Crash Course Astronomy (YouTube)

OER Commons: Open Educational Resources

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Careers in Astronomy (Ask an Astronomer, Cornell University)

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Sky & Telescope, ScienceDaily, Phys.org, NPR Archives

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Acapella Science (YouTube Channel)

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Celestial News & Events – Sky & Telescope The essential guide to astronomy

  • Earth's New "Minimoon" May be a 1960s-Era Rocket...
    by David Dickinson on November 21, 2020 at 2:00 pm

    An object set to pass near Earth next month may in fact be a relic of the early Space Age. The post Earth's New "Minimoon" May be a 1960s-Era Rocket Booster appeared first on Sky & Telescope.

  • Leonid Meteor Shower to the Rescue
    by Bob King on November 16, 2020 at 1:56 pm

    Modest but reliable, the annual Leonid meteor shower returns this week. Take an hour or two to relax and enjoy the show. The post Leonid Meteor Shower to the Rescue appeared first on Sky & Telescope.

  • Behold Mars! The Best View Until 2035
    by Bob King on October 6, 2020 at 3:34 pm

    After a two-years hiatus Mars returns big and bright at opposition on October 13th, its best apparition until September 2035. The post Behold Mars! The Best View Until 2035 appeared first on Sky & Telescope.

  • October 2020: Mars is the Star!
    by Kelly Beatty on October 1, 2020 at 5:04 pm

    October evenings offer many wonderful night-sky sights — including a dramatic appearance by Mars — and you can find them by listening to our guided audio tour of the star-filled sky. The post October 2020: Mars is the Star! appeared first on Sky & Telescope.

  • International Observe the Moon Night Is Here
    by Diana Hannikainen on September 25, 2020 at 1:36 pm

    International Observe the Moon Night is here. Step outside Saturday evening and admire our closest celestial neighbor with your family. The post International Observe the Moon Night Is Here appeared first on Sky & Telescope.


Space Telescopes News -- ScienceDaily Space Telescopes. Astronomy articles and pictures from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and Chandra X-Ray Telescope and many other leading astronomy institutes from around the world.

  • Puzzling 'cold quasar' forming new stars in spite...
    on November 30, 2020 at 4:35 pm

    Using NASA's SOFIA telescope, researchers have found CQ 4479, a galaxy which never had been closely studied before, to be generating new stars in spite of a luminous AGN at the galaxy's center.

  • New Hubble data explains missing dark matter
    on November 30, 2020 at 4:35 pm

    The missing dark matter in certain galaxies can be explained by the effects of tidal disruption: the gravity forces of a neighboring massive galaxy, literally tearing the smaller galaxy apart.

  • Earth faster, closer to black hole, in new map of...
    on November 30, 2020 at 3:12 pm

    Earth 'just got' 7 km/s faster and about 2000 light-years closer to the supermassive black hole in the center of the Milky Way Galaxy. But don't worry, this doesn't mean that our planet is critical. Instead the changes are results of a better model of the Milky Way Galaxy based on new observation data, including a catalog of objects observed over the course of more than 15 years.

  • Astronomical instrument hunts for ancient metal
    on November 30, 2020 at 2:17 pm

    Researchers created a new astronomical instrument that has successfully aided in estimating the abundance of metals in the early universe. The WINERED instrument allows for better observations of astronomical bodies like quasars in the early universe, billions of years ago. Researchers hope this deeper level of exploration could help answer questions about the origins not only of metals in the universe but also of the stars themselves.

  • Blue Ring Nebula: 16-year-old cosmic mystery...
    on November 18, 2020 at 7:16 pm

    Astronomers have solved the 16-year-old mystery surrounding the Blue Ring Nebula - an unusual, large, faint blob of gas with a star at its center. This object is unlike any they'd ever seen before in our Milky Way galaxy. The team has discovered the nebula appears to be the first known example of a merged star system at this stage.


Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories Phys.org internet news portal provides the latest news on science including: Physics, Nanotechnology, Life Sciences, Space Science, Earth Science, Environment, Health and Medicine.

  • Galaxy survives black hole's feast—for now
    on November 27, 2020 at 6:10 pm

    Black holes are thought to gobble up so much surrounding material that they put an end to the life of their host galaxy. In that process they create a highly energetic object called a quasar which was previously thought to halt star birth. Now researchers have found a galaxy that is surviving the ravenous forces of a quasar by continuing to birth new stars –about 100 Sun-sized stars a year.

  • Earth faster, closer to black hole in new map of...
    on November 27, 2020 at 5:13 pm

    Earth just got 7 km/s faster and about 2000 light-years closer to the supermassive black hole in the center of the Milky Way Galaxy. But don't worry, this doesn't mean that our planet is plunging towards the black hole. Instead the changes are results of a better model of the Milky Way Galaxy based on new observation data, including a catalog of objects observed over the course of more than 15 years by the Japanese radio astronomy project VERA.

  • New transient ultraluminous X-ray source detected...
    on November 27, 2020 at 3:24 pm

    An international team of astronomers has identified a new ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) in the galaxy NGC 7090. The object, designated NGC 7090 ULX3, was found using NASA's Swift spacecraft. The finding is detailed in a paper published November 17 on the arXiv pre-print repository.

  • The case of the missing dark matter: new suspect...
    on November 27, 2020 at 11:27 am

    A faraway galaxy with almost no dark matter has threatened to break our theory of galaxy formation. New evidence suggests the galaxy isn't an anomaly—but a victim of theft.

  • New Hubble data explains missing dark matter
    on November 26, 2020 at 6:41 pm

    New data from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope provides further evidence for tidal disruption in the galaxy NGC 1052-DF4. This result explains a previous finding that this galaxy is missing most of its dark matter. By studying the galaxy's light and globular cluster distribution, astronomers have concluded that the gravity forces of the neighbouring galaxy NGC 1035 stripped the dark matter from NGC 1052-DF4 and are now tearing the galaxy apart.