Bee

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General

Portal

Honeybees (Harvard Subject Guides), Bee Resources (American Bee Journal, Buzz about Bees

Dictionary

bee : any of numerous hymenopterous insects that differ from the related wasps especially in the heavier hairier body and in having sucking as well as chewing mouthparts, that feed on pollen and nectar, and that store both and often also honey — Webster

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Encyclopedia

Bees are flying insects closely related to wasps and ants, known for their role in pollination and, in the case of the best-known bee species, the European honey bee, for producing honey and beeswax. Bees are a monophyletic lineage within the superfamily Apoidea and are presently considered a clade, called Anthophila. There are nearly 20,000 known species of bees in seven recognized biological families. They are found on every continent except Antarctica, in every habitat on the planet that contains insect-pollinated flowering plants.

Some species including honey bees, bumblebees, and stingless bees live socially in colonies. Bees are adapted for feeding on nectar and pollen, the former primarily as an energy source and the latter primarily for protein and other nutrients. Most pollen is used as food for larvae. Bee pollination is important both ecologically and commercially; the decline in wild bees has increased the value of pollination by commercially managed hives of honey bees.

Bees range in size from tiny stingless bee species whose workers are less than 2 millimetres (0.08 in) long, to Megachile pluto, the largest species of leafcutter bee, whose females can attain a length of 39 millimetres (1.54 in). The most common bees in the Northern Hemisphere are the Halictidae, or sweat bees, but they are small and often mistaken for wasps or flies. Vertebrate predators of bees include birds such as bee-eaters; insect predators include beewolves and dragonflies. — Wikipedia

Encyclopædia Britannica

Introduction

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Science

Melittology is a branch of entomology concerning the scientific study of bees. It may also be called apicology. Melittology covers the species found in the clade Anthophila within the superfamily Apoidea, comprising more than 20,000 species, including bumblebees and honey bees. — Wikipedia





BEEEEEEEES! (It’s Okay To Be Smart, YOuTube Channel)

Technology

Apiculture or beekeeping, is the maintenance of bee colonies, commonly in man-made hives, by humans. Most such bees are honey bees in the genus Apis, but other honey-producing bees such as Melipona stingless bees are also kept. A beekeeper (or apiarist) keeps bees in order to collect their honey and other products that the hive produces (including beeswax, propolis, flower pollen, bee pollen, and royal jelly), to pollinate crops, or to produce bees for sale to other beekeepers. A location where bees are kept is called an apiary or “bee yard.” — Wikipedia

Preservation

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Häagen-Dazs Hopes to Save the Bees With VR (Rebecca Hills-Duty, VR Focus)
Save The Honey Bees with Häagen-Dazs (Haagen-Dazs)

History

History of Beekeeping (Buzz About Bees)

Museum



Oxford University Museum of Natural History



Bees (Harvad Museum of Natural History)
Honeybees (Harvard Subject Guides)

Library

WorldCat, Library of Congress, UPenn Online Books, Open Library

Participation

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OER Commons: Open Educational Resources

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Organization

International Bee Research Association

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Buzz about Bees

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American Bee Journal, Phys.org, NPR Archives

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ISBNdb

Government

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USA.gov

Expression

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Bee Jokes (Jokes 4 Us)

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Bees in Art

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BEEEEEEEES! (It’s Okay To Be Smart, YOuTube Channel)

Poem

OEDILF: The Omnificent English Dictionary In Limerick Form

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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories Phys.org internet news portal provides the latest news on science including: Physics, Nanotechnology, Life Sciences, Space Science, Earth Science, Environment, Health and Medicine.

  • 'Flying bulldog': world's largest bee refound
    on February 21, 2019 at 6:01 pm

    The world's largest bee—a giant insect roughly the size of a human thumb—has been rediscovered in a remote part of Indonesia in its first sighting in nearly 40 years, researchers said Thursday. […]

  • Worrying long-term stability of pesticides in...
    on February 21, 2019 at 2:35 pm

    Researchers from the University of Neuchâtel, Switzerland have developed an ultra-sensitive method to quantify extremely low concentrations of neonicotinoid pesticides in honey. This is a follow up to their study on the global contamination of honey by these pesticides published in the Journal Science in October 2017. The authors, which also include colleagues from the Botanical Garden of Neuchâtel, found that these pesticides did not degrade in honey over a period of 40 months. […]

  • City bees' favourite flowers, according to our...
    on February 20, 2019 at 4:12 pm

    As cities get bigger and cover more land, the need to make space for wildlife – including insects – in urban areas has become more pressing. Research has shown that cites may not be such a bad place for pollinating insects such as bumble bees, solitary bees and hoverflies. In fact, one UK study of ten cities and two large towns found a greater variety of species in urban areas than in rural areas, while another study showed some UK urban areas hosted stronger bumble bee colonies […]

  • Foreign bees monopolize prize resources in...
    on February 20, 2019 at 3:01 pm

    Hike around the natural habitats of San Diego County and it becomes abundantly clear that honey bees, foreign to the area, are everywhere. In a study published last year, researchers at the University of California San Diego found that honey bees are the most widespread and abundant pollinators of wild plants in the world, with the San Diego region having exceptionally high honey bee visitation on native plants—roughly three-quarters of all observed pollinators. […]

  • What happens to the natural world if all the...
    on February 18, 2019 at 1:17 pm

    There are an awful lot of insects. It's hard to say exactly how many because 80% haven't yet been described by taxonomists, but there are probably about 5.5m species. Put that number together with other kinds of animals with exoskeletons and jointed legs, known collectively as arthropods – this includes mites, spiders and woodlice – and there are probably about 7m species in all. […]


  • Bee Pollen Granules: Living a Healthier Lifestyle
    on November 27, 2012 at 3:43 pm

    Numerous cultures have always praised bee pollen for helping a person lead a long and healthier life. There are certainly plenty of benefits to consuming this wonder food. […]

  • Being Aware of a Safe Bee Pollen Dosage
    on July 8, 2012 at 5:52 pm

    Bee pollen has been heralded as a perfect food. However, there are certain precautions to be taken before consuming any bee pollen product in the correct dosage. […]

  • Bee Pollen Supplement: The Numerous Benefits
    on May 28, 2012 at 9:36 am

    There are significant reasons as to why using bee pollen could potentially help you. […]

  • Potentiated Bee Pollen: What Exactly is It?
    on April 2, 2012 at 2:37 pm

    Potentiated bee pollen can make quite a difference when you consume it. Your digestive system will certainly notice the difference! […]

  • Pure Bee Pollen: Being Aware of Pollution
    on March 27, 2012 at 2:59 pm

    It is vitally important that we consume food such as bee pollen that is pure in nature. This means that the environment in which it grows must be unpolluted and that genetically modified crops must not affect it. […]