Computation

Cosma Home > Communication > Media > Computation

Spotlight


Related

Pages

These are organized by form and function.

Communications Computation Storage Authoring Simulation
Analog Mail Device Paper Typewriter Automaton
Electronic Network Calculator Tape Recorder Elektro
Digital Internet Computer
Hardware Modem Microprocessor Memory Peripheral Robot, XR
Software Service (Web) Program (OS) Database Application AI, World

Resources

These are organized by a classification scheme developed exclusively for Cosma. More…

General

Dictionary

compute : to determine especially by mathematical means Compute the area of the triangle.; also : to determine or calculate by means of a computer computing pi to over one billion places — Webster

OneLook, Free Dictionary, Wiktionary

Encyclopedia

Computation is any type of calculation that follows a well-defined model understood and expressed as, for example, an algorithm. The study of computation is paramount to the discipline of computer science. — Wikipedia

Encyclopædia Britannica

Search

WolframAlpha

Theory

Theory of Computation (CSAIL, MIT)

Science




Preservation

History


Mechanical Aids to Computation and the Development of Algorithms (Paul E. Dunne)

Museum

Computational Sciences (American Museum of Natural History)

Library

WorldCat, Library of Congress, UPenn Online Books, Open Library

Participation

Education



Computational Thinking (Wikipedia)

Course

Introduction to Computational Media (Ian Bogost, Georgia Tech)
OER Commons: Open Educational Resources

News

Association for Computing Machinery, Phys.org

Book

ISBNdb

Government

Document

USA.gov

Poem

OEDILF: The Omnificent English Dictionary In Limerick Form

returntotop

More…

Communications of the ACM: Theory The latest news, opinion and research in theory, from Communications online.


Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories Phys.org internet news portal provides the latest news on science including: Physics, Nanotechnology, Life Sciences, Space Science, Earth Science, Environment, Health and Medicine.

  • New design principles for spin-based quantum...
    on September 18, 2020 at 5:07 pm

    As our lives become increasingly intertwined with technology—whether supporting communication while working remotely or streaming our favorite show—so too does our reliance on the data these devices create. Data centers supporting these technology ecosystems produce a significant carbon footprint—and consume 200 terawatt hours of energy each year, greater than the annual energy consumption of Iran. To balance ecological concerns yet meet growing demand, advances in microelectronic […]

  • New calculation refines comparison of matter with...
    on September 17, 2020 at 6:09 pm

    An international collaboration of theoretical physicists—including scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and the RIKEN-BNL Research Center (RBRC)—has published a new calculation relevant to the search for an explanation of the predominance of matter over antimatter in our universe. The collaboration, known as RBC-UKQCD, also includes scientists from CERN (the European particle physics laboratory), Columbia University, the University of […]

  • Molecular 'dances' determine how liquids take up...
    on September 16, 2020 at 2:43 pm

    Scientists have uncovered a link between the microscopic movements of particles in a liquid and its ability to absorb heat.

  • New study helps characterise the fusion of metals
    on September 15, 2020 at 4:55 pm

    In recent years, a great deal of effort has been devoted to the study of the melting curve of elements at high pressure. This information is relevant, for example, for applications such as nuclear fission reactors that involve very high temperatures or very high pressures. Or to deepen the knowledge on the interior of planets. Understanding what happens to iron—and to other transition metals, such as niobium—in the interior of the Earth is fundamental for any geophysical model and opens the […]

  • Ancient volcanoes once boosted ocean carbon, but...
    on September 14, 2020 at 7:00 pm

    A new study of an ancient period that is considered the closest natural analog to the era of modern human carbon emissions has found that massive volcanism sent great waves of carbon into the oceans over thousands of years—but that nature did not come close to matching what humans are doing today. The study estimates that humans are now introducing the element three to eight times faster, or possibly even more. The consequences for life both in the water and on land are potentially […]