Dinosaur

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Giant dinosaur slims down… a bit (BBC)
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Dinosaurs Science Tracer Bullet (Library of Congress)
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Dictionary

Dinosaur : any of a group (Dinosauria) of extinct often very large chiefly terrestrial carnivorous or herbivorous reptiles of the Mesozoic era — Webster

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Encyclopedia

Dinosaurare a diverse group of reptiles of the clade Dinosauria. They first appeared during the Triassic period, between 243 and 233.23 million years ago, although the exact origin and timing of the evolution of dinosaurs is the subject of active research. They became the dominant terrestrial vertebrates after the Triassic–Jurassic extinction event 201 million years ago; their dominance continued through the Jurassic and Cretaceous periods. Reverse genetic engineering and the fossil record both demonstrate that birds are modern feathered dinosaurs, having evolved from earlier theropods during the late Jurassic Period. As such, birds were the only dinosaur lineage to survive the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event 66 million years ago. Dinosaurs can therefore be divided into avian dinosaurs, or birds; and non-avian dinosaurs, which are all dinosaurs other than birds. — Wikipedia

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Dinosaurs News -- ScienceDaily All about dinosaurs. Read about dinosaur discoveries including gigantic meat-eating dinosaurs, earliest dinosaurs and more. Dinosaur pictures and articles.

  • Gigantic mammal 'cousin' discovered
    on November 23, 2018 at 6:44 pm

    During the Triassic period (252-201 million years ago) mammal-like reptiles called therapsids co-existed with ancestors to dinosaurs, crocodiles, mammals, pterosaurs, turtles, frogs, and lizards. One group of therapsids are the dicynodonts. Researchers have discovered fossils from a new genus of gigantic dicynodont. The new species is called Lisowicia bojani. […]

  • Rare fossil bird deepens mystery of avian...
    on November 13, 2018 at 1:09 pm

    Today's birds descend from a small number of bird species living before the dinosaur extinction. Some of the birds that went extinct, the enantiornithines, were actually more common than and out-competed modern bird ancestors. Analysis of a newly described fossil, the most complete known from the Americas, demonstrates, too, that the enantiornithines were as agile and strong in flight as the ancestors of modern birds. Why, then, did enantiornithines die out and modern birds flourish? […]

  • A toast to the proteins in dinosaur bones
    on November 9, 2018 at 12:30 pm

    Burnt toast and dinosaur bones have a common trait, according to a new study. They both contain chemicals that, under the right conditions, transform original proteins into something new. It's a process that may help researchers understand how soft-tissue cells inside dinosaur bones can survive for hundreds of millions of years. […]

  • Most complete study on Europe's greatest...
    on November 8, 2018 at 3:59 pm

    The Basturs Poble site (Lleida) is the most important site in Europe when it comes to hadrosaur remains. It has yielded over 1000 fossils, probably pertaining to the same species. Palaeontologists have now published the most complete study of fossils recovered from the site and reveals the presence of many young individuals. […]

  • The teeth of Changchunsaurus: Rare insight into...
    on November 7, 2018 at 7:34 pm

    The teeth of Changchunsaurus parvus, a small herbivorous dinosaur from the Cretaceous of China, represent an important and poorly-known stage in the evolution of ornithopod dentition, according to a study. […]


Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories Phys.org internet news portal provides the latest news on science including: Physics, Nanotechnology, Life Sciences, Space Science, Earth Science, Environment, Health and Medicine.

  • Five reasons why 2018 was a big year for...
    on December 12, 2018 at 2:50 pm

    A lot happened in the world of palaeontology in 2018. Some of the big events included some major fossil finds, a new understanding of our reptile ancestors and a major controversy whose outcome could rewrite human history. The Conversation Africa asked Dr. Julien Benoit to discuss five important moments in palaeontology you may have missed during 2018, and what they mean – particularly for Africa and its place in the story of human origins. […]

  • Geminids meteor shower: An astrophysicist on what...
    on December 11, 2018 at 2:50 pm

    The Geminids meteor shower peaks on the mornings of December 13 and 14, 2018 – but if you look up any time there's a clear night sky up until December 17, you might just catch a glimpse of a Geminid meteor. […]

  • Chile's pine forests: a botanical dinosaur bound...
    on December 11, 2018 at 8:30 am

    In Quinquen, an indigenous community in southern Chile, Ricardo Melinir shows off a forest of Chilean pine trees—the araucaria araucana, a "living fossil" seen as sacred by several local tribes. […]

  • Humans may be reversing the climate clock, by 50...
    on December 10, 2018 at 8:00 pm

    Our future on Earth may also be our past. In a study published Monday (Dec. 10, 2018) in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers show that humans are reversing a long-term cooling trend tracing back at least 50 million years. And it's taken just two centuries. […]

  • Scientists discover how birds and dinosaurs...
    on December 10, 2018 at 2:05 pm

    Iridescence is responsible for some of the most striking visual displays in the animal kingdom. Now, thanks to a new study of feathers from almost 100 modern bird species, scientists have gained new insights into how this colour diversity evolved. […]