Mammal

Cosma Home > Communication > Knowledge > Realm > Terrestrial > Sphere > Life > Animal > Mammal

Spotlight

Related

Pages

Terrestrial (Earth)
Sphere Land, Ice, Water (Ocean), Air, Life (Cell, Gene, Microscope)
Ecosystem Forest, Grassland, Desert, Arctic, Aquatic

Tree of Life
Microorganism
Plant Flower, Tree
Animal
Invertebrate Octopus, Ant, Bee, Butterfly, Spider, Lobster
Vertebrate Fish, Seahorse, Ray, Shark, Frog, Turtle, Tortoise, Dinosaur
Bird, Ostrich, Owl, Crow, Parrot
Mammal Bat, Rabbit, Giraffe, Camel, Horse, Elephant, Mammoth
Whale, Dolphin, Walrus, Seal, Polar Bear, Bear, Cat, Tiger, Lion, Dog, Wolf
Monkey, Chimpanzee, Human

Resources

These are organized by a classification scheme developed exclusively for Cosma. More…

General

Portal

Mammals – Mammalogy (Martindale’s Reference Desk)

Dictionary

mammal : any of a class (Mammalia) of warm-blooded higher vertebrates (such as placentals, marsupials, or monotremes) that nourish their young with milk secreted by mammary glands, have the skin usually more or less covered with hair, and include humans — Webster

OneLook, Free Dictionary, Wiktionary, Urban Dictionary

Encyclopedia

Mammals are the vertebrates within the class Mammalia, a clade of endothermic amniotes distinguished from reptiles (including birds) by the possession of a neocortex (a region of the brain), hair, three middle ear bones, and mammary glands. Females of all mammal species nurse their young with milk, secreted from the mammary glands.

Mammals include the largest animal on the planet, the blue whale. The basic body type is a terrestrial quadruped, but some mammals are adapted for life at sea, in the air, in trees, underground or on two legs. The largest group of mammals, the placentals, have a placenta, which enables the feeding of the fetus during gestation. Mammals range in size from the 30–40 mm (1.2–1.6 in) bumblebee bat to the 30-meter (98 ft) blue whale. With the exception of the five species of monotreme (egg-laying mammals), all modern mammals give birth to live young. Most mammals, including the six most species-rich orders, belong to the placental group. The largest orders are the rodents, bats and Soricomorpha (shrews and allies). The next three biggest orders, depending on the biological classification scheme used, are the Primates (apes and monkeys), the Cetartiodactyla (whales and even-toed ungulates), and the Carnivora (cats, dogs, seals, and allies). — Wikipedia

Encyclopædia Britannica

Search

WolframAlpha

Preservation

Mammals (Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History)

Library

WorldCat, Library of Congress, UPenn Online Books, Open Library

Participation

Education

Introducing the Mammals (Biology4Kids)

Course

OER Commons: Open Educational Resources

Community

News

Science Daily, Phys.org, NPR Archives

Book

ISBNdb

Government

Document

USA.gov

returntotop

More…

Mammals News -- ScienceDaily Mammals in the news, wild mammals, mammal conservation efforts, and domesticated mammals.

  • Women influenced coevolution of dogs and humans
    on January 25, 2021 at 2:40 pm

    A cross-cultural analysis found several factors may have played a role in building the relationship between humans and dogs, including temperature, hunting and surprisingly - gender. The analysis used ethnographic information from 144 traditional, subsistence-level societies from all over the globe. People were more likely to regard dogs as a type of person if the dogs had a special relationship with women -- such as having names and being treated as family.

  • Shift in caribou movements may be tied to human...
    on January 22, 2021 at 4:22 pm

    Human activities might have shifted the movement of caribou in and near the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, according to scientists who tracked them using isotopic analysis from shed antlers. The study is timely given the auction this year of oil and gas leases in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Indigenous Alaskans opposed the leases, arguing development could disrupt the migration of caribou they depend on for sustenance.

  • A large number of gray whales are starving and...
    on January 22, 2021 at 3:16 pm

    It is now the third year that gray whales have been found in very poor condition or dead in large numbers along the west coast of Mexico, USA and Canada, and scientist have raised their concerns. An international study suggests that starvation is contributing to these mortalities.

  • California harbor porpoises rebound after coastal...
    on January 21, 2021 at 6:20 pm

    Harbor porpoises have rebounded in a big way off California. Their populations have recovered dramatically since the end of state set-gillnet fisheries that years ago entangled and killed them in the nearshore waters they frequent. These coastal set-gillnet fisheries are distinct from federally-managed offshore drift-gillnet fisheries. They have been prohibited in inshore state waters for more than a decade. The new research indicates that the coastal set gillnets had taken a greater toll on […]

  • Indigenous lands: A haven for wildlife
    on January 21, 2021 at 6:19 pm

    Indigenous peoples' lands may harbor a significant proportion of threatened and endangered species globally, according to new research.


Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories Phys.org internet news portal provides the latest news on science including: Physics, Nanotechnology, Life Sciences, Space Science, Earth Science, Environment, Health and Medicine.

  • How did forelimb function change as vertebrates...
    on January 22, 2021 at 7:00 pm

    When tetrapods (four-limbed vertebrates) began to move from water to land roughly 390 million years ago it set in motion the rise of lizards, birds, mammals, and all land animals that exist today, including humans and some aquatic vertebrates such as whales and dolphins.

  • Rediscovery of the 'extinct' Pinatubo volcano...
    on January 22, 2021 at 5:44 pm

    In June 1991, Mount Pinatubo, a volcanic peak on the Philippine Island of Luzon, literally blew its top. It was the second-most powerful volcanic eruption of the 20th century, ten times stronger than Mount Saint Helens, and its effects were devastating. Lava and ash spewed into the surrounding environment in the Zambales Mountains, pooling in layers up to 600 feet thick in the valleys. Following the eruption, powerful typhoons and monsoon rains triggered landslides and ash flows that continued […]

  • Proteins unspool DNA so cells can take on unique...
    on January 22, 2021 at 4:39 pm

    Biologists have long wondered how complex organisms contain a variety of dramatically different types of cells with specialized functions, even though all of those cells are genetically identical.

  • A large number of gray whales are starving and...
    on January 22, 2021 at 3:55 pm

    It's mid-January 2021, and the first gray whales from the eastern North Pacific population have started to arrive in the breeding lagoons in Baja California, Mexico. Since the start of their southbound migration from their high latitude feeding grounds, several sightings of emaciated gray whales have already been reported along their migration route.

  • New research demonstrates how the best camouflage...
    on January 22, 2021 at 1:44 pm

    A new method, developed by scientists at the University of Bristol can determine the optimal colouration pattern to cover an object in order to make it as visible or concealed as possible, in any given environment.