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Mammals – Mammalogy (Martindale’s Reference Desk)

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mammal : any of a class (Mammalia) of warm-blooded higher vertebrates (such as placentals, marsupials, or monotremes) that nourish their young with milk secreted by mammary glands, have the skin usually more or less covered with hair, and include humans — Webster

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Mammals are the vertebrates within the class Mammalia, a clade of endothermic amniotes distinguished from reptiles (including birds) by the possession of a neocortex (a region of the brain), hair, three middle ear bones, and mammary glands. Females of all mammal species nurse their young with milk, secreted from the mammary glands.

Mammals include the largest animal on the planet, the blue whale. The basic body type is a terrestrial quadruped, but some mammals are adapted for life at sea, in the air, in trees, underground or on two legs. The largest group of mammals, the placentals, have a placenta, which enables the feeding of the fetus during gestation. Mammals range in size from the 30–40 mm (1.2–1.6 in) bumblebee bat to the 30-meter (98 ft) blue whale. With the exception of the five species of monotreme (egg-laying mammals), all modern mammals give birth to live young. Most mammals, including the six most species-rich orders, belong to the placental group. The largest orders are the rodents, bats and Soricomorpha (shrews and allies). The next three biggest orders, depending on the biological classification scheme used, are the Primates (apes and monkeys), the Cetartiodactyla (whales and even-toed ungulates), and the Carnivora (cats, dogs, seals, and allies). — Wikipedia

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Mammals News -- ScienceDaily Mammals in the news, wild mammals, mammal conservation efforts, and domesticated mammals.

  • Global change is triggering an identity switch in...
    on August 19, 2019 at 8:43 pm

    Since the first Homo sapiens emerged in Africa roughly 300,000 years ago, grasslands have sustained humanity and thousands of other species. But today, those grasslands are shifting beneath our feet. Global change -- which includes climate change, pollution and other widespread environmental alterations -- is transforming the plant species growing in them, and not always in the ways scientists expected, a new study has revealed.

  • Tiny GPS backpacks uncover the secret life of...
    on August 16, 2019 at 2:10 pm

    A new study using miniaturized satellite-based tags revealed that during drier periods desert bats must fly further and longer to fulfill their nightly needs. According to researchers this signals their struggle in facing dry periods.

  • What a group of bizarre-looking bats can tell us...
    on August 14, 2019 at 1:44 pm

    Bats with skulls and teeth adapted to a wide range of diets are helping scientists understand how major groups of mammals first evolved.

  • Rare antelopes and black cats
    on August 14, 2019 at 12:12 pm

    Numerous large mammals have been documented with video traps on Mount Kilimanjaro by researchers. The protected areas of the mountain are of tremendous importance for the biodiversity of this animal group.

  • Poo's clues: Moose droppings indicate Isle Royale...
    on August 13, 2019 at 2:54 pm

    Moose are picky eaters, and that's a good thing for their ecosystems.


Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories Phys.org internet news portal provides the latest news on science including: Physics, Nanotechnology, Life Sciences, Space Science, Earth Science, Environment, Health and Medicine.

  • Making biominerals: Nature's recipe is old,...
    on August 20, 2019 at 11:10 am

    In recent years, scientists have teased out many of the secrets of biomineralization, the process by which sea urchins grow spines, mollusks build their shells and corals make their skeletons, not to mention how mammals and other animals make bones and teeth.

  • Scientists discover new way to reconstruct what...
    on August 20, 2019 at 11:05 am

    Scientists could be set to reveal the most accurate depictions of ancient vertebrates ever made after a world-first discovery at University College Cork (UCC) in Ireland.

  • Tiny GPS backpacks uncover the secret life of...
    on August 19, 2019 at 1:00 pm

    A new study from the University of Helsinki using miniaturized satellite-based tags revealed that during drier periods desert bats must fly further and longer to fulfill their nightly needs. According to researchers this signals their struggle in facing dry periods.

  • Wildlife summit mulls trade rules to counter...
    on August 18, 2019 at 10:23 am

    Conservationists warned of "unprecedented" species declines Saturday as countries met in Geneva to tighten rules on trade in elephant ivory and products from other endangered animal and plants.

  • From tusks to tails, nations eye trade in...
    on August 17, 2019 at 8:40 am

    From guitars to traditional medicines and from tusk to tail, mankind's exploitation of the planet's fauna and flora is putting some of them at risk of extinction. Representatives of some 180 nations are meeting in Geneva to agree on protections for vulnerable species, taking up issues including the trade in ivory and the demand for shark fin soup.