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Mammals – Mammalogy (Martindale’s Reference Desk)

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mammal : any of a class (Mammalia) of warm-blooded higher vertebrates (such as placentals, marsupials, or monotremes) that nourish their young with milk secreted by mammary glands, have the skin usually more or less covered with hair, and include humans — Webster

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Mammals are the vertebrates within the class Mammalia, a clade of endothermic amniotes distinguished from reptiles (including birds) by the possession of a neocortex (a region of the brain), hair, three middle ear bones, and mammary glands. Females of all mammal species nurse their young with milk, secreted from the mammary glands.

Mammals include the largest animal on the planet, the blue whale. The basic body type is a terrestrial quadruped, but some mammals are adapted for life at sea, in the air, in trees, underground or on two legs. The largest group of mammals, the placentals, have a placenta, which enables the feeding of the fetus during gestation. Mammals range in size from the 30–40 mm (1.2–1.6 in) bumblebee bat to the 30-meter (98 ft) blue whale. With the exception of the five species of monotreme (egg-laying mammals), all modern mammals give birth to live young. Most mammals, including the six most species-rich orders, belong to the placental group. The largest orders are the rodents, bats and Soricomorpha (shrews and allies). The next three biggest orders, depending on the biological classification scheme used, are the Primates (apes and monkeys), the Cetartiodactyla (whales and even-toed ungulates), and the Carnivora (cats, dogs, seals, and allies). — Wikipedia

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Mammals News -- ScienceDaily Mammals in the news, wild mammals, mammal conservation efforts, and domesticated mammals.

  • Study finds high levels of toxic pollutants in...
    on August 6, 2020 at 7:36 pm

    Researchers examined toxins in tissue concentrations and pathology data from 83 stranded dolphins and whales from 2012 to 2018. They looked at 11 different animal species to test for 17 different substances. The study is the first to report on concentrations in blubber tissues of stranded cetaceans of atrazine, DEP, NPE and triclosan. It also is the first to report concentrations of toxicants in a white-beaked dolphin and in Gervais' beaked whales.

  • Why the 'wimpy' Y chromosome hasn't evolved out...
    on August 6, 2020 at 3:18 pm

    The Y chromosome has shrunken drastically over 200 million years of evolution. Even those who study it have used the word 'wimpy' to describe it, and yet it continues to stick around. An Opinion paper outlines a new theory -- called the 'persistent Y hypothesis' --t o explain why the Y chromosome may be more resilient than it first appears.

  • Herbicide harming marsupial health and...
    on August 6, 2020 at 2:18 pm

    Researchers exposed the adult female tammar wallabies to atrazine contaminated water throughout pregnancy, birth and lactation to help establish the extent of harm being caused by the chemical. They then examined the reproductive development of their young by assessing their growth and development to establish that the herbicide is causing major abnormalities in the male reproductive system in many animals.

  • Tasmanian devil research offers new insights for...
    on August 6, 2020 at 2:17 pm

    Researchers found a single genetic mutation that leads to reduced growth of a transmissible cancer in Tasmanian devils in the wild. The finding gives hope for the animals' survival and could lead to new treatment for human cancers.

  • Dolphin calf entangled in fishing line only lived...
    on August 4, 2020 at 1:33 pm

    Researchers examined the outcome of an entangled bottlenose dolphin calf with monofilament fishing line wrapped tightly around its upper jaw. It was successfully disentangled and immediately released it back into its natural habitat. Surviving only two years, results showed long-term severe damage due to this entanglement including emaciation. There are about 1,000 bottlenose dolphins that live in the Indian River Lagoon, which also is a very popular location for recreational fishing.


Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories Phys.org internet news portal provides the latest news on science including: Physics, Nanotechnology, Life Sciences, Space Science, Earth Science, Environment, Health and Medicine.

  • Lions are less likely to attack cattle with eyes...
    on August 7, 2020 at 1:36 pm

    The predation of livestock by carnivores, and the retaliatory killing of carnivores as a result, is a major global conservation challenge. Such human-wildlife conflicts are a key driver of large carnivore declines and the costs of coexistence are often disproportionately borne by rural communities in the global south.

  • Study could lead to power over the New World...
    on August 7, 2020 at 1:26 pm

    Scientists have long had a name for a gruesome insect that feeds on the live flesh of warm-blooded mammals: C. hominivorax, Latin for "man eater." But now, they have the parasite's number.

  • Eye-catching conservation tool protects...
    on August 7, 2020 at 1:23 pm

    Painting eyes on the rumps of livestock can protect them from attacks by lions in landscapes where they coexist, a joint study from UNSW Sydney, Taronga Conservation Society Australia and Botswana Predator Conservation shows.

  • Why it's important to save parasites
    on August 7, 2020 at 12:38 pm

    Unlike the many charismatic mammals, fish and birds that receive our attention, parasites are thought of as something to eradicate—not something to protect.

  • Pesticides and industrial pollutants found in...
    on August 7, 2020 at 12:20 pm

    Researchers recently found pesticides and industrial compounds deposited in snow atop four high-elevation glacier sites on the Norwegian archipelago Svalbard, often considered a "pristine" environment. The long journey of these compounds—likely originating in the United States and Eurasia—shows the far-reaching impacts of industrial pollution.