Mammoth

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Artificial womb could grow mammoth-elephant hybrid, researchers say (Claire Reilly, CNET)

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mammoth : any of a genus (Mammuthus) of extinct Pleistocene mammals of the elephant family distinguished from recent elephants by highly ridged molars, usually large size, very long tusks that curve upward, and well-developed body hair — Webster

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Mammoth is any species of the extinct genus Mammuthus, one of the many genera that make up the order of trunked mammals called proboscideans. The various species of mammoth were commonly equipped with long, curved tusks and, in northern species, a covering of long hair. They lived from the Pliocene epoch (from around 5 million years ago) into the Holocene at about 4,000 years ago, and various species existed in Africa, Europe, Asia, and North America. They were members of the family Elephantidae, which also contains the two genera of modern elephants and their ancestors.

The oldest representative of Mammuthus, the South African mammoth (M. subplanifrons), appeared around 5 million years ago during the early Pliocene in what is now southern and eastern Africa. Descendant species of these mammoths moved north and continued to propagate into numerous subsequent species, eventually covering most of Eurasia before extending into the Americas at least 600,000 years ago. The last species to emerge, the woolly mammoth (M. primigenius), developed about 400,000 years ago in East Asia, with some surviving on Russia’s Wrangel Island in the Arctic Ocean until as recently as roughly 3,700 to 4,000 years ago, still in existence during the construction of the Great Pyramid of ancient Egypt. — Wikipedia

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About Mammoths (University of California Museum of Paleontology)
Brief introduction to the Mammoth (Gennady Baryshnikov, Illinois State Museum)

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  • In Mexico City, experts find bones of dozens of...
    on May 22, 2020 at 3:02 pm

    Archaeologists have found the bones of about 60 mammoths at an airport under construction just north of Mexico City, near human-built 'traps' where more than a dozen mammoths were found last year.

  • Mammoths, mastodons and the fruit they left...
    on May 21, 2020 at 1:45 pm

    Scientists at the Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory are constantly pushing at the boundaries of the unknown in their attempt to understand the origin and physical properties of the universe. Yet Fermilab is more than a gateway to the subatomic world: It's also home to rare and endangered ecosystems, such as grassland prairies and riparian forests, which are becoming increasingly hard to find in the northern United States.

  • Arctic Edmontosaurus lives again: A new look at...
    on May 6, 2020 at 6:00 pm

    A new study by an international team from the Perot Museum of Nature and Science in Dallas and Hokkaido University and Okayama University of Science in Japan further explores the proliferation of the most commonly occurring duck-billed dinosaur of the ancient Arctic as the genus Edmontosaurus. The findings also reinforce that the hadrosaurs—known as the "caribou of the Cretaceous"—had a huge geographical distribution of approximately 60 degrees of latitude, spanning the North […]

  • Will humans go extinct? For all the existential...
    on May 6, 2020 at 1:40 pm

    Will our species go extinct? The short answer is yes. The fossil record shows everything goes extinct, eventually. Almost all species that ever lived, over 99.9%, are extinct.

  • Disappearance of animal species takes mental,...
    on April 27, 2020 at 4:46 pm

    For thousands of years, indigenous hunting societies have subsisted on specific animals for their survival. How have these hunter-gatherers been affected when these animals migrate or go extinct?