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monkey : a nonhuman primate mammal with the exception usually of the lemurs and tarsiers; especially : any of the smaller longer-tailed catarrhine or platyrrhine primates as contrasted with the apes — Webster

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Monkeys are haplorhine (“dry-nosed”) primates, a group generally possessing tails and consisting of about 260 known living species. There are two distinct lineages of monkeys: New World Monkeys and catarrhines. Apes emerged within the catarrhines with the Old World monkeys as a sister group, so cladistically they are monkeys as well. However, traditionally apes are not considered monkeys, rendering this grouping paraphyletic. The equivalent monophyletic clade are the simians. Many monkey species are tree-dwelling (arboreal), although there are species that live primarily on the ground, such as baboons. Most species are also active during the day (diurnal). Monkeys are generally considered to be intelligent, particularly Old World monkeys. — Wikipedia

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Monkeys News -- ScienceDaily Monkeys in the news. From squirrel monkeys to baboons, read all the latest research about monkeys.

  • Experimental antibody 'cocktail' protects animals...
    on January 10, 2019 at 9:09 pm

    Scientists have developed a combination of monoclonal antibodies that protected animals from all three Ebola viruses that cause human disease. The antibody 'cocktail,' called MBP134, is the first experimental treatment to protect monkeys against Ebola virus (formerly known as Ebola Zaire), as well as Sudan virus and Bundibugyo virus, and could lead to a broadly effective therapeutic. […]

  • Where will the world's next Zika, West Nile or...
    on January 4, 2019 at 6:12 pm

    Scientists have identified wildlife species that are the most likely to host flaviviruses such as Zika, West Nile, dengue and yellow fever. They created a global flavivirus hotspot map from their findings. […]

  • Contact with monkeys and apes puts populations at...
    on December 27, 2018 at 8:06 pm

    Animal diseases that infect humans are a major threat to human health, and diseases often spillover to humans from nonhuman primates. Now, researchers have carried out an extensive social sciences evaluation of how populations in Cameroon interact with nonhuman primates, pointing toward behaviors that could put people at risk of infection with new diseases. […]

  • Howler monkey study examines mechanisms of new...
    on December 22, 2018 at 11:07 pm

    A new study of interbreeding between two species of howler monkeys in Mexico is yielding insights into the forces that drive the evolution of new species. […]

  • For gait transitions, stability often trumps...
    on December 20, 2018 at 6:02 pm

    Working with nine animal models, researchers find a preference for stability over energy conservation during speed-related gait transitions. […]


Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories Phys.org internet news portal provides the latest news on science including: Physics, Nanotechnology, Life Sciences, Space Science, Earth Science, Environment, Health and Medicine.

  • Tanzania forest to be protected as a result of...
    on January 16, 2019 at 12:57 pm

    The United Republic of Tanzania has announced it will protect a globally unique forest ecosystem in East Africa, following research that demonstrated it is under threat from illegal activities including tree-cutting for charcoal and the poaching of elephants and other animals. […]

  • Singapore eco-tourism plan sparks squawks of...
    on January 9, 2019 at 7:22 am

    Singapore is creating a vast eco-tourism zone in a bid to bring in more visitors, but environmentalists fear the development will damage natural habitats and are already blaming it for a series of animal deaths. […]

  • Protecting proboscis monkeys from deforestation
    on January 4, 2019 at 1:08 pm

    A 10-year study of proboscis monkeys in Borneo has revealed that forest conversion to oil palm plantations is having a significant impact on the species. […]

  • Howler monkey study examines mechanisms of new...
    on December 22, 2018 at 7:40 am

    A new University of Michigan study of interbreeding between two species of howler monkeys in Mexico is yielding insights into the forces that drive the evolution of new species. […]

  • For gait transitions, stability often trumps...
    on December 20, 2018 at 6:09 pm

    A dog's gait, according to the American Kennel Club, is "the pattern of footsteps at various rates of speed, each distinguished by a particular rhythm and footfall." When dogs trot, for example, the right front leg and the left hind leg move together. This is an intermediate gait, faster than walking but slower than running. […]