Monkey

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monkey : a nonhuman primate mammal with the exception usually of the lemurs and tarsiers; especially : any of the smaller longer-tailed catarrhine or platyrrhine primates as contrasted with the apes — Webster

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Monkeys are haplorhine (“dry-nosed”) primates, a group generally possessing tails and consisting of about 260 known living species. There are two distinct lineages of monkeys: New World Monkeys and catarrhines. Apes emerged within the catarrhines with the Old World monkeys as a sister group, so cladistically they are monkeys as well. However, traditionally apes are not considered monkeys, rendering this grouping paraphyletic. The equivalent monophyletic clade are the simians. Many monkey species are tree-dwelling (arboreal), although there are species that live primarily on the ground, such as baboons. Most species are also active during the day (diurnal). Monkeys are generally considered to be intelligent, particularly Old World monkeys. — Wikipedia

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Monkeys News -- ScienceDaily Monkeys in the news. From squirrel monkeys to baboons, read all the latest research about monkeys.

  • New fossil discovery illuminates the lives of the...
    on February 24, 2021 at 3:08 pm

    A new fossil discovery is central to primate ancestry and adds to our understanding of how life on land recovered after the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event 66 million years ago that wiped out all dinosaurs, except for birds.

  • DNA extracted from modern, ancient and fossil...
    on February 23, 2021 at 4:07 pm

    The next time you eat seafood, think about the long-term effects. Will consistently eating the biggest fish or the biggest conch, mean that only the smaller individuals will have a chance to reproduce?

  • Saki monkeys get screen time for more control...
    on February 23, 2021 at 3:07 pm

    Scientists have designed and built an on-demand video device for white-faced saki monkeys to activate as and when they like. It's up to the animals to decide whether they want to step inside the device - the equivalent of pressing play - to watch the video of the week, from sealife like fish and jellyfish to wiggly worms and other zoo animals to abstract art and lush forests.

  • Capuchin monkey genome reveals clues to its long...
    on February 15, 2021 at 2:24 pm

    Scientists have sequenced the genome of a capuchin monkey for the first time, uncovering new genetic clues about the evolution of their long lifespan and large brains.

  • Lemurs show there's no single formula for lasting...
    on February 12, 2021 at 2:41 pm

    Humans aren't the only mammals that form long-term bonds with a single, special mate -- some lemurs and other animals do, too. Researchers are mapping the hormone receptors that underlie these primates' ability to pair up for the long haul. Their findings suggest the brain circuitry that makes love last in some species may not be the same in others.


Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories Phys.org internet news portal provides the latest news on science including: Physics, Nanotechnology, Life Sciences, Space Science, Earth Science, Environment, Health and Medicine.

  • Why do we love koalas so much? Because they look...
    on February 19, 2021 at 2:30 pm

    The koala is a much-loved species and lucrative tourism drawcard. Yet, for all its popularity, koalas are forecast to be extinct in NSW within 30 years.

  • New protected area relieves pressure on primates...
    on February 18, 2021 at 3:32 pm

    The future of globally important wildlife—including endangered chimpanzees and pangolins—looks a little brighter after over 17,000 hectares of severely threatened forest habitat in an ecologically unique region of South Sudan were granted formal protection.

  • Study predicts where new coronaviruses might...
    on February 17, 2021 at 1:15 pm

    The potential scale of novel coronavirus generation in wild and domesticated animals may have been highly underappreciated, suggests new University of Liverpool research.

  • Capuchin monkey genome reveals clues to its long...
    on February 15, 2021 at 8:15 am

    An international team of scientists has sequenced the genome of a capuchin monkey for the first time, uncovering new genetic clues about the evolution of their long lifespan and large brains.

  • Lemurs show there's no single formula for lasting...
    on February 12, 2021 at 10:00 am

    Humans aren't the only mammals that form long-term bonds with a single, special mate—some bats, wolves, beavers, foxes and other animals do, too. But new research suggests the brain circuitry that makes love last in some species may not be the same in others.