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monkey : a nonhuman primate mammal with the exception usually of the lemurs and tarsiers; especially : any of the smaller longer-tailed catarrhine or platyrrhine primates as contrasted with the apes — Webster

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Monkeys are haplorhine (“dry-nosed”) primates, a group generally possessing tails and consisting of about 260 known living species. There are two distinct lineages of monkeys: New World Monkeys and catarrhines. Apes emerged within the catarrhines with the Old World monkeys as a sister group, so cladistically they are monkeys as well. However, traditionally apes are not considered monkeys, rendering this grouping paraphyletic. The equivalent monophyletic clade are the simians. Many monkey species are tree-dwelling (arboreal), although there are species that live primarily on the ground, such as baboons. Most species are also active during the day (diurnal). Monkeys are generally considered to be intelligent, particularly Old World monkeys. — Wikipedia

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Monkeys News -- ScienceDaily Monkeys in the news. From squirrel monkeys to baboons, read all the latest research about monkeys.

  • Coppery titi monkeys do not deceive their partners
    on November 23, 2020 at 1:53 pm

    Since methods for genetic paternity analyses were introduced it became clear that many pair-living animal species, including humans, do not take partnership fidelity that seriously. In most species there is some proportion of offspring that is not sired by their social father. Coppery titi monkeys living in the Amazon lowland rainforest seem to be an exception. Scientists could not find evidence for extra-pair paternity in their study population in Peru. Mate choice seems to be so successful […]

  • Mimicking SARS-CoV-2 nasal infection in monkeys
    on November 12, 2020 at 7:40 pm

    A new rhesus macaque animal model recapitulates the clinical and pathological manifestations of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) observed in humans by mimicking natural infection via the nasal route, according to a new study.

  • How organ functions were shaped over the course...
    on November 11, 2020 at 7:44 pm

    A large-scale study conducted by molecular biologists has yielded groundbreaking new insights into the evolution and regulation of gene expression in mammalian organs. The scientists investigated RNA synthesis and subsequent protein synthesis in the organs of humans and other representative mammals. They were able to demonstrate that the interplay of the two synthesis processes during evolution was crucial for shaping organ functions.

  • When new males take over, these female primates...
    on November 5, 2020 at 4:30 pm

    Most mammals -- including humans and other primates -- reach sexual maturity early or late depending on lots of different factors, such as how much food there is to eat. Now, researchers studying close primate relatives of baboons known as geladas have shown for the first time that females of this species suddenly hurry up and mature when a new male enters the picture.

  • The first duckbill dinosaur fossil from Africa...
    on November 5, 2020 at 1:37 pm

    The first fossils of a duckbilled dinosaur have been discovered in Africa, suggesting dinosaurs crossed hundreds of kilometres of open water to get there.


Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories Phys.org internet news portal provides the latest news on science including: Physics, Nanotechnology, Life Sciences, Space Science, Earth Science, Environment, Health and Medicine.

  • Plastic film used to protect foods and surfaces...
    on November 19, 2020 at 8:55 pm

    Transparent stretchable PVC film for use in packaging meat, fruit, cold cuts, and other foods, and to protect surfaces, can inactivate the novel coronavirus.

  • How organ functions were shaped over the course...
    on November 11, 2020 at 7:11 pm

    A large-scale study conducted by molecular biologists from Heidelberg University has yielded groundbreaking new insights into the evolution and regulation of gene expression in mammalian organs. The scientists investigated RNA synthesis and subsequent protein synthesis in the organs of humans and other representative mammals, and with the aid of sequencing technologies, they analyzed more than 100 billion gene expression fragments from various organs. They were able to demonstrate that the […]

  • Newly discovered primate in Myanmar 'already...
    on November 11, 2020 at 9:05 am

    Scientists have identified a new species of primate living in the forests of central Myanmar, a lithe tree-dweller with a mask-like face framed by a shock of unruly grey hair.

  • Cell aging can be slowed by oxidants
    on November 9, 2020 at 1:58 pm

    At high concentrations, reactive oxygen species—known as oxidants—are harmful to cells in all organisms and have been linked to aging. But a study from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, has now shown that low levels of the oxidant hydrogen peroxide can stimulate an enzyme that helps slow down the aging of yeast cells.

  • Zoo monkeys prefer traffic noise to natural...
    on November 6, 2020 at 4:29 pm

    They may be naturally suited to swinging in rainforests, but monkeys in a Finnish zoo have demonstrated a "significant" preference for traffic sounds instead of the noises of the jungle, researchers have found.