Mouse

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Spotlight


Night-vision ‘super-mice’ created using light-converting nanoparticles (Matthew Warren, Nature)
Mammalian Near-Infrared Image Vision through Injectable and Self-Powered Retinal Nanoantennae (Yuqian Ma, et al., Cell)
A shot of nanoparticles lets mice see in the dark (MIT Technology Review)

Resources

These are organized by a classification scheme developed exclusively for Cosma. More…

General

Portal

Rodents (Martindale’s Reference Desk)
Rodents Portal (Wikipedia)

Dictionary

mouse : any of numerous small rodents (as of the genus Mus) with pointed snout, rather small ears, elongated body, and slender tail — Webster

OneLook, Free Dictionary, Wiktionary

rat : : any of numerous rodents (Rattus and related genera) differing from the related mice especially by considerably larger size — Webster

OneLook, Free Dictionary, Wiktionary

Thesaurus

Roget’s II (Thesaurus.com), Merriam-Webster Thesaurus, Visuwords

Encyclopedia

Mouse, plural mice, is a small rodent characteristically having a pointed snout, small rounded ears, a body-length scaly tail and a high breeding rate. The best known mouse species is the common house mouse (Mus musculus). It is also a popular pet. In some places, certain kinds of field mice are locally common. They are known to invade homes for food and shelter.

Species of mice are mostly found in Rodentia, and are present throughout the order. Typical mice are found in the genus Mus.

Mice are typically distinguished from rats by their size. Generally, when someone discovers a smaller muroid rodent, its common name includes the term mouse, while if it is larger, the name includes the term rat. Common terms rat and mouse are not taxonomically specific. Scientifically, the term mouse is not confined to members of Mus for example, the deer mouse.

Domestic mice sold as pets often differ substantially in size from the common house mouse. This is attributable both to breeding and to different conditions in the wild. The best-known strain, the white lab mouse, has more uniform traits that are appropriate to its use in research. — Wikipedia

Encyclopædia Britannica

Rats are various medium-sized, long-tailed rodents. Species of rats are found throughout the order Rodentia, but stereotypical rats are found in the genus Rattus. Other rat genera include Neotoma (pack rats), Bandicota (bandicoot rats) and Dipodomys (kangaroo rats).

Rats are typically distinguished from mice by their size. Generally, when someone discovers a large muroid rodent, its common name includes the term rat, while if it is smaller, its name includes the term mouse. The common terms rat and mouse are not taxonomically specific. — Wikipedia

Encyclopædia Britannica

Search

Mouse (WolframAlpha), Rat (WolframAlpha)

Hypothesis




Science




Communication



Field and laboratory studies of vocal rodents (Bret Pasch, Northern Arizona University)
Interspecific Dominance Via Vocal Interactions Mediates Altitudinal Zonation in Neotropical Singing Mice (Bret Pasch, Benjamin M. Bolker and Steven M. Phelps, The American Natura)


Male mice song syntax depends on social contexts and influences female preferences (Jonathan Chabout1, Abhra Sarkar, David B. Dunson and Erich D. Jarvis, Frontiers of Behavioral Neuroscience)
Call of the Wild: The male mouse’s adorable ultrasonic mating songs (Jim Festante, Slate)

The melodious mouse that sings for sex (Tracy T. Burkhard, Rebecca R. Westwick and Steven M. Phelp, Phys.org)
Adiposity signals predict vocal effort in Alston’s singing mice (Tracy T. Burkhard, Rebecca R. Westwick and Steven M. Phelps, Proceedings of the Royal Society B)



Singing mice could offer clues about how human brains manage conversation (Jennifer Ouellette, Ars Technica)
These mice sing their little hearts out—and that’s good for neuroscience (Jessica Boddy, Popular Science)
This singing mouse’s brain could reveal keys to snappy conversation (Kelly Servick, Science Magazine)
Motor cortical control of vocal interaction in neotropical singing mice (Daniel E. Okobi Jr., et al., Science Magazine)





Meet DeepSqueak, an algorithm built to decode ultrasonic rat squeaks (William Poor, The verge)
DeepSqueak helps researchers decode rodent chatter (University of Washington School of Medicine)

Aging


Scientists Can Reverse DNA Aging in Mice (Alice Park, Time)

Preservation

History


Quotation

Quotations Page, Wikiquote

Museum

Mouse Museum (Wikipedia)

Library

WorldCat, Library of Congress, UPenn Online Books, Open Library

Participation

Education


Course

OER Commons: Open Educational Resources

Community

News

Science Daily, Phys.org, NPR Archives

Book

ISBNdb

Government

National Center for Biotechnology Information: Mouse Genome Resources

Document

USA.gov

Expression


Fun

Note: This is a 360° video — press and hold to explore it!

Hobby



7 Reasons Why Rats and Mice Make Great Pets (PetMD)

Poem

OEDILF: The Omnificent English Dictionary In Limerick Form

Fiction

List of fictional rodents (Wikipedia)

returntotop

More…

Mice News -- ScienceDaily The mouse. What have researchers learned from obese mice, anxious mice and cancer-resistant mice? Read research using mouse models of disease.

  • Breaking up is hard to do (especially for sex...
    on May 28, 2020 at 8:05 pm

    A team of scientists has discovered how the X and Y chromosomes find one another, break, and recombine during meiosis even though they have little in common.

  • Exploiting viruses to attack cancer cells
    on May 28, 2020 at 3:58 pm

    Scientists have made an adenovirus that specifically replicates inside and kills cancer cells by employing special RNA-stabilizing elements.

  • HLH research points to treatment for COVID-19...
    on May 28, 2020 at 1:21 pm

    A transgenic mouse developed to model the deadly childhood immune disease HLH (hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis) may play a key role in saving lives during the COVID-19 virus pandemic.

  • Mouse model mimics SARS-CoV-2 infection in humans
    on May 27, 2020 at 4:33 pm

    A mouse model of infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) reproduces features observed in human patients, researchers report.

  • Chromosomal speciation in wild house mice
    on May 26, 2020 at 6:53 pm

    A new look into the genomes of natural populations of the common house mice by a team of researchers suggests that large-scale chromosomal rearrangements play an important role in speciation.

  • How a protein can inhibit cancer development in...
    on May 26, 2020 at 6:53 pm

    In a new study, researchers have discovered how the protein PP2A can inhibit tumor growth in mice. The protein turns off an enzyme that stimulates cell growth, thus inhibiting the development of cancer.

  • Terrestrial bacteria can grow on nutrients from...
    on May 26, 2020 at 6:52 pm

    As inevitable fellow travellers on the bodies of astronauts, spaceships, or equipment, terrestrial microorganisms will undoubtedly come into contact with extraterrestrial environments. Researchers now describe how bacteria can survive on an 'extraterrestrial diet', which affected their pathogenic potential.

  • Cell reproduction dogma challenged
    on May 22, 2020 at 6:51 pm

    Meiosis is essential to sexual reproduction. For almost 15 years, it has been commonly held that retinoic acid, a molecule derived from vitamin A, triggers meiosis in mammalian germ cells. Yet new research demonstrates that meiosis in mice begins and proceeds normally even in the absence of retinoic acid. These findings set the stage for new research in the field of reproductive biology.

  • Scientists identify gene linked to thinness that...
    on May 21, 2020 at 3:26 pm

    Researchers used a genetic database of more than 47,000 people in Estonia to identify a gene linked to thinness that may play a role in resisting weight gain in metabolically healthy thin people. They show that knocking out this gene results in thinner flies and mice and find that expression of it in the brain may be involved in regulating energy expenditure.

  • Environmental contaminants alter gut microbiome,...
    on May 21, 2020 at 3:26 pm

    The microbes that inhabit our bodies are influenced by what we eat, drink, breathe and absorb through our skin, and most of us are chronically exposed to natural and human-made environmental contaminants. Scientists review the research linking dozens of environmental chemicals to changes in the gut microbiome and associated health challenges.


Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories Phys.org internet news portal provides the latest news on science including: Physics, Nanotechnology, Life Sciences, Space Science, Earth Science, Environment, Health and Medicine.

  • Antiaging biochemical mechanism found in mouse,...
    on March 11, 2020 at 2:28 pm

    Aging is an inevitable part of life, yet some species are aging very differently than others, even than very similar ones.

  • Cat parasite reduces general anxiety in infected...
    on January 14, 2020 at 3:00 pm

    The cat parasite Toxoplasma gondii is known to cause infected rodents to lose their fear of feline predators, which makes the mice easier to catch. Predators then spread the parasites through their feces. But this so-called fatal feline attraction theory is flawed, suggests a study publishing January 14 in the journal Cell Reports. Rather than exhibiting a loss of feline-specific fear, infected rodents actually show a decrease in general anxiety and reduced aversion to a wide range of threats.

  • The next generation: mice can reproduce after...
    on September 26, 2019 at 6:44 am

    Male mice that spent more than a month in space were able to successfully reproduce back on Earth, a study has found, the first evidence of how space travel affects reproduction in mammals.

  • Thanks to science, parasite can have sex in mice,...
    on July 30, 2019 at 10:59 am

    Toxoplasma gondii, a single-celled parasite perhaps best known for its ability to trick mice into taking potentially fatal risks around cats and, in humans, as a serious threat to fetal health, has given up a long-held secret of its reproduction.

  • Wildlife service withdraws request for approval...
    on July 11, 2019 at 2:00 pm

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Wednesday withdrew its request that the California Coastal Commission sanction its controversial mouse eradication proposal on the Farallon Islands.

  • US wants to dump 1.5 tons of rat poison pellets...
    on July 9, 2019 at 4:41 pm

    For most humans, life on these jagged islands off the coast of San Francisco would be a nightmare: Waves lash the shore with treacherous force, the stench of guano fills the air, and the screech of seagulls is so loud that resident scientists wear earplugs to bed.

  • Two new species of 'tweezer-beaked hopping rats'...
    on June 6, 2019 at 2:00 pm

    Just about everybody loves peanut butter. We put it on sandwiches and in candy, we use it to trick our dogs into taking their heartworm pills, and, when we have to, we bait mouse traps with it. But, as scientists learned when trapping rodents in the mountains of the Philippines, peanut butter isn't for everyone. A highly distinctive (weird-looking) group of rodents sometimes called "tweezer-beaked hopping rats" don't care for peanut butter, but love earthworms. Armed with this knowledge (and […]

  • 'Longevity gene' responsible for more efficient...
    on April 22, 2019 at 12:27 pm

    Explorers have dreamt for centuries of a Fountain of Youth, with healing waters that rejuvenate the old and extend life indefinitely.

  • Here's what that house proud mouse was doing –...
    on March 25, 2019 at 12:20 pm

    A house proud mouse, considerately tidying up the workbench of the shed in which it lives, has been captured on video and shared online. The mouse pops out of a box, picks up some screws, nail clippers and a metal chain and carries them back into the box. It's tempting to think the mouse is cleaning up its home in the same way that a human would. Of course, in biology, things are rarely that simple.

  • Changes in rat size reveal habitat of 'Hobbit'...
    on March 13, 2019 at 3:41 pm

    A study of rat body sizes shifting over time gives a glimpse into the habitat of the mysterious hominin Homo floresiensis—nicknamed the "Hobbit" due to its diminutive stature.