Mouse

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Spotlight


Night-vision ‘super-mice’ created using light-converting nanoparticles (Matthew Warren, Nature)
Mammalian Near-Infrared Image Vision through Injectable and Self-Powered Retinal Nanoantennae (Yuqian Ma, et al., Cell)
A shot of nanoparticles lets mice see in the dark (MIT Technology Review)

Resources

These are organized by a classification scheme developed exclusively for Cosma. More…

General

Portal

Rodents (Martindale’s Reference Desk)
Rodents Portal (Wikipedia)

Dictionary

mouse : any of numerous small rodents (as of the genus Mus) with pointed snout, rather small ears, elongated body, and slender tail — Webster

OneLook, Free Dictionary, Wiktionary

rat : : any of numerous rodents (Rattus and related genera) differing from the related mice especially by considerably larger size — Webster

OneLook, Free Dictionary, Wiktionary

Thesaurus

Roget’s II (Thesaurus.com), Merriam-Webster Thesaurus, Visuwords

Encyclopedia

Mouse, plural mice, is a small rodent characteristically having a pointed snout, small rounded ears, a body-length scaly tail and a high breeding rate. The best known mouse species is the common house mouse (Mus musculus). It is also a popular pet. In some places, certain kinds of field mice are locally common. They are known to invade homes for food and shelter.

Species of mice are mostly found in Rodentia, and are present throughout the order. Typical mice are found in the genus Mus.

Mice are typically distinguished from rats by their size. Generally, when someone discovers a smaller muroid rodent, its common name includes the term mouse, while if it is larger, the name includes the term rat. Common terms rat and mouse are not taxonomically specific. Scientifically, the term mouse is not confined to members of Mus for example, the deer mouse.

Domestic mice sold as pets often differ substantially in size from the common house mouse. This is attributable both to breeding and to different conditions in the wild. The best-known strain, the white lab mouse, has more uniform traits that are appropriate to its use in research. — Wikipedia

Encyclopædia Britannica

Rats are various medium-sized, long-tailed rodents. Species of rats are found throughout the order Rodentia, but stereotypical rats are found in the genus Rattus. Other rat genera include Neotoma (pack rats), Bandicota (bandicoot rats) and Dipodomys (kangaroo rats).

Rats are typically distinguished from mice by their size. Generally, when someone discovers a large muroid rodent, its common name includes the term rat, while if it is smaller, its name includes the term mouse. The common terms rat and mouse are not taxonomically specific. — Wikipedia

Encyclopædia Britannica

Search

Mouse (WolframAlpha), Rat (WolframAlpha)

Hypothesis




Science




Communication



Field and laboratory studies of vocal rodents (Bret Pasch, Northern Arizona University)
Interspecific Dominance Via Vocal Interactions Mediates Altitudinal Zonation in Neotropical Singing Mice (Bret Pasch, Benjamin M. Bolker and Steven M. Phelps, The American Natura)


Male mice song syntax depends on social contexts and influences female preferences (Jonathan Chabout1, Abhra Sarkar, David B. Dunson and Erich D. Jarvis, Frontiers of Behavioral Neuroscience)
Call of the Wild: The male mouse’s adorable ultrasonic mating songs (Jim Festante, Slate)

The melodious mouse that sings for sex (Tracy T. Burkhard, Rebecca R. Westwick and Steven M. Phelp, Phys.org)
Adiposity signals predict vocal effort in Alston’s singing mice (Tracy T. Burkhard, Rebecca R. Westwick and Steven M. Phelps, Proceedings of the Royal Society B)



Singing mice could offer clues about how human brains manage conversation (Jennifer Ouellette, Ars Technica)
These mice sing their little hearts out—and that’s good for neuroscience (Jessica Boddy, Popular Science)
This singing mouse’s brain could reveal keys to snappy conversation (Kelly Servick, Science Magazine)
Motor cortical control of vocal interaction in neotropical singing mice (Daniel E. Okobi Jr., et al., Science Magazine)





Meet DeepSqueak, an algorithm built to decode ultrasonic rat squeaks (William Poor, The verge)
DeepSqueak helps researchers decode rodent chatter (University of Washington School of Medicine)

Aging


Scientists Can Reverse DNA Aging in Mice (Alice Park, Time)

Preservation

History


Quotation

Quotations Page, Wikiquote

Museum

Mouse Museum (Wikipedia)

Library

WorldCat, Library of Congress, UPenn Online Books, Open Library

Participation

Education


Course

OER Commons: Open Educational Resources

Community

News

Science Daily, Phys.org, NPR Archives

Book

ISBNdb

Government

National Center for Biotechnology Information: Mouse Genome Resources

Document

USA.gov

Expression


Fun

Note: This is a 360° video — press and hold to explore it!

Hobby



7 Reasons Why Rats and Mice Make Great Pets (PetMD)

Poem

OEDILF: The Omnificent English Dictionary In Limerick Form

Fiction

List of fictional rodents (Wikipedia)

returntotop

More…

Mice News -- ScienceDaily The mouse. What have researchers learned from obese mice, anxious mice and cancer-resistant mice? Read research using mouse models of disease.

  • Primate brain size does not predict their...
    on September 25, 2020 at 3:33 pm

    A research team has systematically investigated the cognitive abilities of lemurs, which have relatively small brains compared to other primates. Conducting systematic tests with identical methods revealed that cognitive abilities of lemurs hardly differ from those of monkeys and great apes. Instead, this study revealed that the relationship between brain size and cognitive abilities cannot be generalized and it provides new insights into the evolution of primates.

  • Twinkling, star-shaped brain cells may hold the...
    on September 24, 2020 at 6:15 pm

    A new study suggests that star-shaped brain cells known as astrocytes could be as important to the regulation of sleep as neurons. The study builds new momentum toward ultimately solving the mystery of why we sleep and how sleep works in the brain. The discovery may also set the stage for potential future treatment strategies for sleep disorders and neurological diseases and other conditions associated with troubled sleep.

  • Something old, something new combine for...
    on September 24, 2020 at 5:53 pm

    Scientists are planning for Phase 1 human trials of a vaccine they developed by using CRISPR gene-editing technology to mutate the parasite that causes leishmaniasis, a skin disease common in tropical regions of the world and gaining ground in the United States.

  • How microbes in a mother's intestines affect...
    on September 23, 2020 at 8:46 pm

    During pregnancy in mice, the billions of bacteria and other microbes that live in a mother's intestines regulate key metabolites, small molecules that are important for healthy fetal brain development, biologists report. Scientists had not known until now whether the maternal gut microbiota influenced brain development during critical prenatal periods.

  • Gut microbiome plays important role in sleep...
    on September 23, 2020 at 4:48 pm

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) affects more than one billion people worldwide. Evidence suggests OSA can alter the gut microbiome (GM) and may promote OSA-associated co-morbidities, including diabetes, hypertension and cognitive problems. Researchers have discovered how OSA-related sleep disturbances affect the gut microbiome in mice and how transplanting those gut bacteria into other mice can cause changes to sleep patterns in the recipient mice.

  • New mouse model of tau propagation
    on September 23, 2020 at 4:46 pm

    Accumulation of assembled tau protein in the central nervous system is characteristic of Alzheimer's disease and several other neurodegenerative diseases, called tauopathies. Researchers have now established a new mouse model of tau accumulation and propagation in brain. Single intracerebral injection of synthetic tau filaments induced by dextran sulphate into wild-type mice caused seeding of endogenous tau, followed by spreading to distinct areas in a time-dependent manner.

  • Humans develop more slowly than mice because our...
    on September 17, 2020 at 10:12 pm

    Scientists have found that the 'segmentation clock' -- a genetic network that governs the body pattern formation of embryos -- progresses more slowly in humans than in mice because the biochemical reactions are slower in human cells. The differences in the speeds of biochemical reactions may underlie differences between species in the tempo of development.

  • Could breadfruit be the next superfood?...
    on September 17, 2020 at 4:28 pm

    A fruit used for centuries in countries around the world is getting the nutritional thumbs-up from a team of researchers. Breadfruit, which grows in abundance in tropical and South Pacific countries, has long been a staple in the diet of many people. The fruit can be eaten when ripe, or it can be dried and ground up into a flour and repurposed into many types of meals.

  • New path to neuron regeneration after spinal cord...
    on September 16, 2020 at 3:35 pm

    The astrocytic glial cell has the unique ability to form scar tissue around damaged neurons. The presence of scar tissue is associated with inhibitory effects on the regrowth of mature neurons that are damaged by spinal cord injury. Recent evidence suggests, however, that these inhibitory effects are reversible, and in new work, scientists show that astrocytic glial cells can in fact play a major role in facilitating neuron repair.

  • Reprogramming brain cells enables flexible...
    on September 16, 2020 at 3:35 pm

    Humans, like other animals, have the ability to constantly adapt to new situations. Researchers have utilized a mouse model to reveal which neurons in the brain are in command in guiding adaptive behavior. Their new study contributes to our understanding of decision-making processes in healthy and infirm people.


Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories Phys.org internet news portal provides the latest news on science including: Physics, Nanotechnology, Life Sciences, Space Science, Earth Science, Environment, Health and Medicine.

  • Research finds mouse populations can be...
    on September 25, 2020 at 12:09 pm

    Good news for Western Australian wildlife with a recent study suggesting that mice numbers could be controlled with much smaller doses of poison.

  • Understanding the risks of rodent poisons to...
    on September 17, 2020 at 1:40 pm

    Maureen Murray, V03, director of Tufts Wildlife Clinic and clinical associate professor at Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, has been studying rodenticide exposure in birds of prey for over a decade. Exposure to rodenticides occurs when people use these chemicals to kill unwanted pests. Mice and rats, or possibly other animals, eat the poison, and then the birds eat the poisoned prey.

  • Why rats would win 'Australian Survivor'
    on September 8, 2020 at 4:12 pm

    Australian rodents skulls all correspond to one simple, size-dependent shape that is more than ten million years old but it turns out this lack of change is the secret behind their survivor reputation.

  • Death by irony: The mystery of the mouse that...
    on July 13, 2020 at 2:00 pm

    I looked through the microscope at the insides of a dead smoky mouse, and could barely believe my eyes. Thousands of tiny smoke particles lined its lungs. But the mouse had been kept more than 50 kilometers from the nearest bushfires. How could this be?

  • How deforestation helps deadly viruses jump from...
    on June 25, 2020 at 5:20 pm

    The coronavirus pandemic, suspected of originating in bats and pangolins, has brought the risk of viruses that jump from wildlife to humans into stark focus.

  • Antiaging biochemical mechanism found in mouse,...
    on March 11, 2020 at 2:28 pm

    Aging is an inevitable part of life, yet some species are aging very differently than others, even than very similar ones.

  • Cat parasite reduces general anxiety in infected...
    on January 14, 2020 at 3:00 pm

    The cat parasite Toxoplasma gondii is known to cause infected rodents to lose their fear of feline predators, which makes the mice easier to catch. Predators then spread the parasites through their feces. But this so-called fatal feline attraction theory is flawed, suggests a study publishing January 14 in the journal Cell Reports. Rather than exhibiting a loss of feline-specific fear, infected rodents actually show a decrease in general anxiety and reduced aversion to a wide range of threats.

  • The next generation: mice can reproduce after...
    on September 26, 2019 at 6:44 am

    Male mice that spent more than a month in space were able to successfully reproduce back on Earth, a study has found, the first evidence of how space travel affects reproduction in mammals.

  • Thanks to science, parasite can have sex in mice,...
    on July 30, 2019 at 10:59 am

    Toxoplasma gondii, a single-celled parasite perhaps best known for its ability to trick mice into taking potentially fatal risks around cats and, in humans, as a serious threat to fetal health, has given up a long-held secret of its reproduction.

  • Wildlife service withdraws request for approval...
    on July 11, 2019 at 2:00 pm

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Wednesday withdrew its request that the California Coastal Commission sanction its controversial mouse eradication proposal on the Farallon Islands.