Owl

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General

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Owl Pages
Owl Resources (The Owl Pages)
Owls (All About Brids, The Cornell Lab of Ornithology)

Dictionary

owl : any of an order (Strigiformes) of chiefly nocturnal birds of prey with a large head and eyes, short hooked bill, strong talons, and soft fluffy often brown-mottled plumage — Webster

OneLook, Free Dictionary, Wiktionary, Urban Dictionary

Encyclopedia

Owls are birds from the order Strigiformes, which includes about 200 species of mostly solitary and nocturnal birds of prey typified by an upright stance, a large, broad head, binocular vision, binaural hearing, sharp talons, and feathers adapted for silent flight. Exceptions include the diurnal northern hawk-owl and the gregarious burrowing owl. Owls hunt mostly small mammals, insects, and other birds, although a few species specialize in hunting fish. They are found in all regions of the Earth except Antarctica and some remote islands. Owls are divided into two families: the Strigidae family of true (or typical) owls; and the Tytonidae family of barn-owls. — Wikipedia

Encyclopædia Britannica

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Owls in Mythology and Culture (Deane Lewis, Owl Pages)

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Quotations Page

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OER Commons: Open Educational Resources

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World Owl Trust, Owl Research Institute

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The Best Owls in Literature (Beulah Maud Devaney, Huffington Post)

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OEDILF: The Omnificent English Dictionary In Limerick Form

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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories Phys.org internet news portal provides the latest news on science including: Physics, Nanotechnology, Life Sciences, Space Science, Earth Science, Environment, Health and Medicine.

  • Researchers concerned about prey and predator...
    on September 23, 2020 at 3:11 pm

    New research from UBC Okanagan shows that salvage logging on land damaged by wildfires has negative impacts on a variety of animals.

  • Understanding the risks of rodent poisons to...
    on September 17, 2020 at 1:40 pm

    Maureen Murray, V03, director of Tufts Wildlife Clinic and clinical associate professor at Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, has been studying rodenticide exposure in birds of prey for over a decade. Exposure to rodenticides occurs when people use these chemicals to kill unwanted pests. Mice and rats, or possibly other animals, eat the poison, and then the birds eat the poisoned prey.

  • Endangered wildlife, habitat burned in...
    on September 16, 2020 at 8:19 pm

    Entire wildlife areas have been destroyed and endangered populations of animals gravely depleted by wildfires burning in Eastern Washington.

  • Megafire does not deter Yosemite's spotted owls
    on September 3, 2020 at 7:06 pm

    In 2013 the Rim Fire—the largest fire on record in the Sierra Nevada—burned one third of the potential California Spotted Owl (Strix occidentalis occidentalis) habitat in Yosemite National Park. The park provides prime habitat for this Spotted Owl subspecies, which is listed as a Species of Special Concern by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, and concern grew regarding the fire's effect on Yosemite's owl populations. But recent research provides some good news regarding the […]

  • Bird and reptile tears aren't so different from...
    on August 13, 2020 at 8:12 am

    Bird and reptile tears aren't so unlike our own, shows a new study in Frontiers in Veterinary Science. But the differences could provide insights into better ophthalmic treatments for humans and animals, as well as a clues into the evolution of tears across different species.