Spider

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These are organized by a classification scheme developed exclusively for Cosma. More…

General

Portal

Spiders (Harvard Subject Guides)

Dictionary

spider : any of an order (Araneae synonym Araneida) of arachnids having a short, usually unsegmented abdomen linked to the cephalothorax by the pedicel, chelicerae modified into poison fangs, and two or more pairs of spinnerets at the posterior end of the abdomen for spinning threads of silk for various uses (as in making cocoons for their eggs or webs to catch prey) — Webster

OneLook, Free Dictionary, Wiktionary, Urban Dictionary

Thesaurus

Roget’s II (Thesaurus.com), Merriam-Webster Thesaurus, Visuwords

Glossary

Spider Glossary (Spiders from Europe, Australia and some immunology)

Encyclopedia

Spiders are air-breathing arthropods that have eight legs and chelicerae with fangs that inject venom. They are the largest order of arachnids and rank seventh in total species diversity among all other orders of organisms. Spiders are found worldwide on every continent except for Antarctica, and have become established in nearly every habitat with the exceptions of air and sea colonization. — Wikipedia

Encyclopædia Britannica

Introduction


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WolframAlpha

Science

Arachnology is the scientific study of spiders and related animals such as scorpions, pseudoscorpions, and harvestmen, collectively called arachnids. Those who study spiders and other arachnids are arachnologists. — Wikipedia


Preservation

Museum



Orb-Weavers: Web Masters of the Spider World (Harvard Museum of Natural History)

Library

WorldCat, Library of Congress, UPenn Online Books, Open Library

Participation

Education


Under the spell of spiders (Smithsonian)
Spiders and Scorpions (Biology4Kids)

Course

OER Commons: Open Educational Resources

Community

Occupation

How to become an Arachnologist (Chris Buddle, Arthropod Ecology)

News

Arachnology (British Arachnological Society), Science Daily, Phys.org, NPR Archives

Book

ISBNdb

Government

Document

USA.gov

Expression


Fun





Lucas the Spider (YouTube Channel)

Humor


Poem

OEDILF: The Omnificent English Dictionary In Limerick Form

Music

Song Lyrics

Fiction

Spiders in literature (Wikipedia)

Folklore

Spider Mythology and Folklore (Patti Wigington, ThoughtCo)
Spiders in folklore and mythology (Wikipedia)

returntotop

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Spiders and Ticks News -- ScienceDaily Spiders, scorpions and ticks in the news. Learn why a spider hanging from a thread does not rotate, how spiders find a mate and how ticks carry Lyme Disease. Read about spider silk and spider webs.

  • Highly sensitive sensors show promise in...
    on February 18, 2020 at 11:21 pm

    People rely on a highly tuned sense of touch to manipulate objects, but injuries to the skin and the simple act of wearing gloves can impair this ability. Scientists report the development of a new tactile-enhancement system based on a highly sensitive sensor. The sensor has remarkable sensitivity, allowing the wearer to detect the light brush of a feather. This crack-based sensor was inspired by a spider's slit organ.

  • Orb-weaver spiders' yellow and black pattern...
    on February 11, 2020 at 2:25 pm

    Being inconspicuous might seem the best strategy for spiders to catch potential prey in their webs, but many orb-web spiders, which hunt in this way, are brightly colored. New research finds their distinct yellow and black pattern is actually essential in luring prey.

  • Traditional Chinese medicinal plant yields new...
    on January 29, 2020 at 2:14 pm

    For hundreds of years, practitioners of traditional Chinese medicine have used an herb called Stemona sessilifolia as a remedy for parasitic infections, such as those caused by pinworms and lice. Now, researchers have identified 10 compounds that might be responsible for the herb's effectiveness. But there's a twist: The insecticides are produced by symbiotic microbes that live within the plant's cells -- not by S. sessilifolia itself.

  • The secret of strong underwater mussel adhesion...
    on January 23, 2020 at 2:58 pm

    Scientists have identified a mechanism of adhesive proteins in a mussel that controls the surface adhesion and cohesion. They substantiated the synergy of molecules in adhesive proteins. Their new discovery is expected to be applied in making stronger underwater bioadhesive than the conventional ones.

  • Cave fights for food: Voracious spiders vs....
    on January 21, 2020 at 4:30 pm

    Killing and eating of potential competitors has rarely been documented in the zoological literature, even though this type of interaction can affect population dynamics. Scientists now present notes regarding the predation of an assassin bug by a spider in neotropical caves. Underground, where food resources are scarce, such events might be possible as a result of ecological pressures imposed by the hostile environment, hypothesize the researchers.


Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories Phys.org internet news portal provides the latest news on science including: Physics, Nanotechnology, Life Sciences, Space Science, Earth Science, Environment, Health and Medicine.

  • Into watching horseshoe crabs have sex? Florida...
    on February 20, 2020 at 2:50 pm

    Arthropod passions will soar along Florida's coastal waters in March and April as we reach peak mating season for horseshoe crabs.

  • Highly sensitive sensors show promise in...
    on February 18, 2020 at 4:00 pm

    People rely on a highly tuned sense of touch to manipulate objects, but injuries to the skin and the simple act of wearing gloves can impair this ability. Surgeons, for example, find that gloves decrease their ability to manipulate soft tissues. Astronauts are also hampered by heavy spacesuits and find it difficult to work with equipment while wearing heavy gloves.

  • Repairing actively pumping heart tissue with...
    on February 18, 2020 at 12:41 pm

    If the heart muscle is damaged, repairing the constantly active organ is a challenge. Empa researchers are developing a novel tissue adhesive inspired by nature, which is able to repair lesions in muscle tissue. They have taken advantage of the incredible ability of marine mussels to adhere to any kind of surface.

  • Freshwater insects recover while spiders decline...
    on February 17, 2020 at 4:00 pm

    Many insects, mosses and lichens in the UK are bucking the trend of biodiversity loss, according to a comprehensive analysis of over 5,000 species led by UCL and the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (UKCEH).

  • High-tech imaging under UV light shows which...
    on February 13, 2020 at 8:27 pm

    Scientists have a pretty good handle on how the birds and the bees work, but it comes to mating, almost all millipedes have been a mystery—until now. For the first time, researchers have puzzled out how these tiny creatures' complex genitalia work, thanks to new imaging techniques and blacklights that make the different tissues glow. The findings are published in a new paper in the journal Arthropod Structure and Development.