Spider

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These are organized by a classification scheme developed exclusively for Cosma. More…

General

Portal

Spiders (Harvard Subject Guides)

Dictionary

spider : any of an order (Araneae synonym Araneida) of arachnids having a short, usually unsegmented abdomen linked to the cephalothorax by the pedicel, chelicerae modified into poison fangs, and two or more pairs of spinnerets at the posterior end of the abdomen for spinning threads of silk for various uses (as in making cocoons for their eggs or webs to catch prey) — Webster

OneLook, Free Dictionary, Wiktionary, Urban Dictionary

Thesaurus

Roget’s II (Thesaurus.com), Merriam-Webster Thesaurus, Visuwords

Glossary

Spider Glossary (Spiders from Europe, Australia and some immunology)

Encyclopedia

Spiders are air-breathing arthropods that have eight legs and chelicerae with fangs that inject venom. They are the largest order of arachnids and rank seventh in total species diversity among all other orders of organisms. Spiders are found worldwide on every continent except for Antarctica, and have become established in nearly every habitat with the exceptions of air and sea colonization. — Wikipedia

Encyclopædia Britannica

Introduction


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WolframAlpha

Science

Arachnology is the scientific study of spiders and related animals such as scorpions, pseudoscorpions, and harvestmen, collectively called arachnids. Those who study spiders and other arachnids are arachnologists. — Wikipedia


Preservation

Museum



Orb-Weavers: Web Masters of the Spider World (Harvard Museum of Natural History)

Library

WorldCat, Library of Congress, UPenn Online Books, Open Library

Participation

Education


Under the spell of spiders (Smithsonian)
Spiders and Scorpions (Biology4Kids)

Course

OER Commons: Open Educational Resources

Community

Occupation

How to become an Arachnologist (Chris Buddle, Arthropod Ecology)

News

Arachnology (British Arachnological Society), Science Daily, Phys.org, NPR Archives

Book

ISBNdb

Government

Document

USA.gov

Expression


Fun





Lucas the Spider (YouTube Channel)

Humor


Poem

OEDILF: The Omnificent English Dictionary In Limerick Form

Music

Song Lyrics

Fiction

Spiders in literature (Wikipedia)

Folklore

Spider Mythology and Folklore (Patti Wigington, ThoughtCo)
Spiders in folklore and mythology (Wikipedia)

returntotop

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Spiders and Ticks News -- ScienceDaily Spiders, scorpions and ticks in the news. Learn why a spider hanging from a thread does not rotate, how spiders find a mate and how ticks carry Lyme Disease. Read about spider silk and spider webs.

  • Following the insect meltdown, numbers of orb web...
    on April 23, 2020 at 5:04 pm

    The abundance of large orb web spiders in the Swiss midland has declined drastically over the last 40 years. The main reason for this is the shrinking food supply available to these insectivorous animals.

  • Spider combs tame unruly nanofibers
    on April 22, 2020 at 3:23 pm

    Cribellate spiders spin thousands of tiny nanofibers into sticky threads. To keep from getting caught in their own webs, these spiders use a nonstick comb on their back legs. Now, researchers have patterned an antiadhesive nanostructure inspired by this comb onto a foil surface, creating a handy tool to control sticky lab-made nanomaterials for medical, smart textile and other applications.

  • Spider venom key to pain relief without...
    on April 14, 2020 at 2:55 pm

    Molecules in tarantula venom could be used as an alternative to opioid pain killers for people seeking chronic pain relief.

  • Stream pollution from mountaintop mining doesn't...
    on April 7, 2020 at 11:27 am

    Since the 1980s, a mountaintop mine in West Virginia has been leaching selenium into nearby streams at levels deemed unsafe for aquatic life. Now, even though the mine is closed, a new study finds high concentrations of selenium in emerging stream insects and the spiders that eat them along the banks, an indication that the contaminant moves from water to land as it moves up the food chain.

  • To prevent tick encounters, where you dump your...
    on March 18, 2020 at 2:44 pm

    While many homeowners heed the advice to clear their lawns of fallen leaves in autumn to avoid creating tick-friendly habitat in high-use areas, a new study on tick abundance in leaf litter says raking or blowing leaves just out to the forest edge is not enough. In fact, dumping leaves where grass meets woods may inadvertently create an ideal habitat for blacklegged ticks.


Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories Phys.org internet news portal provides the latest news on science including: Physics, Nanotechnology, Life Sciences, Space Science, Earth Science, Environment, Health and Medicine.

  • World's oldest bug is fossil millipede from...
    on May 28, 2020 at 11:45 am

    A 425-million-year-old millipede fossil from the Scottish island of Kerrera is the world's oldest "bug"—older than any known fossil of an insect, arachnid or other related creepy-crawly, according to researchers at The University of Texas at Austin.

  • Nanodevices show how cells change with time, by...
    on May 26, 2020 at 8:29 pm

    For the first time, scientists have introduced minuscule tracking devices directly into the interior of mammalian cells, giving an unprecedented peek into the processes that govern the beginning of development.

  • Peculiar behavior of the beetle Toramus larvae,...
    on May 22, 2020 at 2:07 pm

    When studying the larval morphology of Toramini (Coleoptera: Erotylidae) we found that larvae of the genus Toramus attach their exuviae to their distal abdomen, with each exuvia from the preceding instar attached to the next to form a vertical pile. Exuvial attachment is facilitated by modified hook-like setae with flattened shafts inserted into the exuvia of the previous instar. We discuss the possibility that the exuvial attachment serves as a kind of autotomy—"exuvial autotomy."

  • Q&A: How synthetic biology will change us
    on May 21, 2020 at 3:30 pm

    John Cumbers is founder and CEO of SynBioBeta, a global network of biological engineers and entrepreneurs in a promising new scientific field known as "synthetic biology." The San Francisco Bay Area is a leader in this little-known but fast-growing industry, which reassembles the building blocks of life in imaginative and diverse ways.

  • Enrichment programs help children build knowledge
    on May 21, 2020 at 3:04 pm

    How we organize information plays an integral role in memory, reasoning and the ability to acquire new knowledge. In the absence of routine education programs, the pandemic is exacerbating the disparities in educational opportunities available for children to develop new skills. While children of higher socio-economic means often benefit from enrichment programs, these opportunities are unfortunately not available to every child.