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Physics Central: Physics in Action (American Physical Society)
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Dictionary

Physical : (a) of or relating to physics (b) characterized or produced by the forces and operations of physics (c) having material existence : perceptible especially through the senses and subject to the laws of nature — Webster

OneLook, Free Dictionary, Wiktionary, Urban Dictionary

Realm : kingdom, sphere, domain — Webster

OneLook, Free Dictionary, Wiktionary, Urban Dictionary

Physical Realm : kingdom, sphere, or domain of things that have material existence and are perceptible, especially those things perceptible through the senses and subject to the laws of nature — M.E.Hopper

Encyclopedia

Physical universe In religion and esotericism, the term “physical universe” or “material universe” is used to distinguish the physical matter of the universe from a proposed spiritual or supernatural essence. — Wikipedia

Eric Weisstein’s World of Physics (ScienceWorld, Wolfram Research)
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Physical science is a branch of natural science that studies non-living systems, in contrast to life science. It in turn has many branches, each referred to as a “physical science”, together called the “physical sciences”. However, the term physical creates an unintended, somewhat arbitrary distinction, since many branches of physical science also study biological phenomena and branches of chemistry, such as organic chemistry. — Wikipedia

Encyclopædia Britannica

Physics is the natural science that studies matter and its motion and behavior through space and time and that studies the related entities of energy and force. Physics is one of the most fundamental scientific disciplines, and its main goal is to understand how the universe behaves. — Wikipedia

Encyclopædia Britannica

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What if?

What If? Answering your hypothetical questions with physics, every Tuesday.

  • Earth-Moon Fire Pole
    by xkcd on May 21, 2018 at 12:00 am

    <article class="entry"> <a href="//what-if.xkcd.com/157/"><h1>Earth-Moon Fire Pole</h1></a> <p id="question">My son (5y) asked me today: If there were a kind of a fireman&#39;s pole from the Moon down to the Earth, how long would it take to slide all the way from the Moon to the Earth?</p> <p id="attribute">Ramon Schönborn, Germany</p> <p>First, let&#39;s get a few things out of the […]

  • Electrofishing for Whales
    by xkcd on March 9, 2017 at 12:00 am

    <article class="entry"> <a href="//what-if.xkcd.com/156/"><h1>Electrofishing for Whales</h1></a> <p id="question">I used to work on a fisheries crew where we would use an electro-fisher backpack to momentarily stun small fish (30 - 100 mm length) so we could scoop them up with nets to identify and measure them. The larger fish tended to be stunned for slightly longer because of their larger surface area but I don&#39;t […]

  • Toaster vs. Freezer
    by xkcd on February 28, 2017 at 12:00 am

    <article class="entry"> <a href="//what-if.xkcd.com/155/"><h1>Toaster vs. Freezer</h1></a> <p id="question">Would a toaster still work in a freezer?</p> <p id="attribute">—<a href="http://www.maximumfun.org/shows/my-brother-my-brother-and-me">My Brother, My Brother and Me</a>, <a […]

  • Coast-to-Coast Coasting
    by xkcd on February 8, 2017 at 12:00 am

    <article class="entry"> <a href="//what-if.xkcd.com/154/"><h1>Coast-to-Coast Coasting</h1></a> <p id="question">What if the entire continental US was on a decreasing slope from West to East. How steep would the slope have to be to sustain the momentum needed to ride a bicycle the entire distance without pedaling?</p> <p id="attribute">—Brandon Rooks</p> <p>Too steep to actually build, […]

  • Hide the Atmosphere
    by xkcd on January 30, 2016 at 12:00 am

    <article class="entry"> <a href="//what-if.xkcd.com/153/"><h1>Hide the Atmosphere</h1></a> <p id="question">Earth’s atmosphere is really thin compared to the radius of the Earth. How big a hole do I need to dig before people suffocate?</p> <p id="attribute">—Sam Burke</p> <p>The idea here is straightforward: When you dig a hole in the ground, the hole fills up with air.<span […]

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EurekAlert! - Chemistry, Physics and Materials Sciences The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  • New US and German collaboration aims to produce...
    on July 26, 2021 at 4:00 am

    (University of Illinois College of Liberal Arts & Sciences) The US National Science Foundation and the German Research Foundation have joined forces to award the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign and Technical University of Darmstadt a three-year $720,000 research grant to explore opportunities to more efficiently produce green hydrogen, a clean and renewable source of energy.

  • Development of a novel technology to check body...
    on July 26, 2021 at 4:00 am

    (National Research Council of Science & Technology) A research team in the Korea Institute of Science and Technology(KIST) has announced the development of a thermal-imaging sensor that overcomes the existing problems of price and operating-temperature limitations. The sensor developed in this work can operate at temperatures upto 100 °C without a cooling device and is expected to be more affordable than standard sensors on the market, which would in turn pave the way for its application […]

  • The mechanics of puncture finally explained
    on July 26, 2021 at 4:00 am

    (University of British Columbia) Soft materials, like skin, behave differently than hard materials when punctured. They provide an unstable resistance that is more difficult to describe and hence predict. Researchers at the University of British Columbia have answered the previously unsolved question of how the mechanics of piercing works on soft materials by studying solutions from the natural world, and have created a mechanical theory that finally predicts the critical force necessary for […]

  • Tweezers of sound can pick objects up...
    on July 24, 2021 at 4:00 am

    (Tokyo Metropolitan University) Tokyo, Japan - Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have developed a new technology which allows non-contact manipulation of small objects using sound waves. They used a hemispherical array of ultrasound transducers to generate a 3D acoustic fields which stably trapped and lifted a small polystyrene ball from a reflective surface. Although their technique employs a method similar to laser trapping in biology, adaptable to a wider range of particle sizes […]

  • Dalian Coherent Light Source reveals strong...
    on July 23, 2021 at 4:00 am

    (Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy Sciences) Scientists revealed strong isotope effects in photodissociation of the water isotopologue (HOD) using the Dalian Coherent Light Source.

  • 'Feel good' brain messenger can be willfully...
    on July 23, 2021 at 4:00 am

    (University of California - San Diego) UC San Diego researchers and their colleagues at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York have discovered that spontaneous impulses of dopamine, the neurological messenger known as the brain's "feel good" chemical, occur in the brain of mice. The study found that mice can willfully manipulate these random dopamine pulses for reward.

  • Topology in biology
    on July 23, 2021 at 4:00 am

    (Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization) A phenomenon known from quantum systems could now make its way into biology:In a new study published in Physical Review X, researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization (MPI-DS) in Goettingen show that the notion of topological protection can also apply to biochemical networks. The model which the scientists developed makes the topological toolbox, typically used only to describe quantum systems, now also […]

  • Device cracks milk protein
    on July 23, 2021 at 4:00 am

    (Flinders University) After gaining world attention by 'unboiling' egg protein, Flinders University scientists have now used an Australian-made novel thin film microfluidic device to manipulate Beta-lactoglobulin (β-lactoglobulin), the major whey protein in cow's, sheep's and other mammals.In the latest application, published in Molecules, College of Science and Engineering experts have combined the capabilities of the VFD with a new form of biosensor called TPE-MI, which is an […]

  • Researchers uncover fatal flaw in green pigmented...
    on July 23, 2021 at 4:00 am

    (Xi'an Jiaotong-Liverpool University) Researchers from Xi'an Jiaotong-Liverpool University have found that an impurity present in many industrial pigmentations drastically reduces the strength and longevity of green architectural concrete.

  • Bio-based coating for wood outperforms...
    on July 23, 2021 at 4:00 am

    (Aalto University) Researchers at Aalto University have used lignin, a natural polymer abundant in wood and other plant sources, to create a safe, low-cost and high-performing coating for use in construction. As there is a global urge to meet the rising sustainability standards, this new coating has great potential to protect wood, whose use in construction is continually increasing. The new coating is non-toxic, hydrofobic, it retains wood's breathability and natural roughness while being […]


Physics News - Physics News, Material Sciences, Science News, Physics The latest news in physics, materials science, quantum physics, optics and photonics, superconductivity science and technology. Updated Daily.

  • Dalian Coherent Light Source reveals strong...
    on July 23, 2021 at 6:00 pm

    Recently, a research group led by Prof. Yuan Kaijun and Prof. Yang Xueming from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences revealed strong isotope effects in photodissociation of the water isotopologue (HOD) using the Dalian Coherent Light Source.

  • A device that cracks milk protein
    on July 23, 2021 at 2:24 pm

    After gaining world attention by 'unboiling' egg protein, Flinders University scientists have now used an Australian-made novel thin film microfluidic device to manipulate Beta-lactoglobulin (β-lactoglobulin), the major whey protein in cow, sheep and other mammal milks.

  • Exploring topology in biology
    on July 23, 2021 at 2:22 pm

    When can we say that a certain property of a system is robust? Intuitively, robustness implies that, even under the effect of external perturbations on the system, no matter how strong or random, said property remains unchanged. In mathematics, properties of an object that are robust against deformations are called topological. For example, the letters s, S, and L can be transformed into each other by stretching or bending their shape. The same holds true for letters o, O, and D. However, it is […]

  • A new theory to explain the transparency of...
    on July 23, 2021 at 1:53 pm

    The electrons of some metal oxides, due to their large effective mass when coupled with the ionic lattice of the material, cannot follow the electric field of light and allow it to pass through the material. Transparent and conductive materials are used in smartphone touch screens and solar panels for photovoltaic energy.

  • A curvy and shape-adaptive imager based on...
    on July 23, 2021 at 1:30 pm

    Curved imagers that can adjust their shape could have many valuable applications, for instance, aiding the development of more advanced medical imaging tools and cameras. Most existing flexible curvy imagers, however, are either not compatible with tunable focal surfaces or can only capture images with low resolutions and pixel fill factors.

  • Buzz about thermoelectrics heats up with...
    on July 23, 2021 at 9:18 am

    The landing of NASA's Perseverance rover was another leap forward not only for space exploration but also for the technology that's powering the craft on its years-long mission on Mars—a thermoelectric generator that turns heat into electricity.

  • Gaming graphics card allows faster, more precise...
    on July 22, 2021 at 4:51 pm

    Nuclear fusion offers the potential for a safe, clean and abundant energy source.

  • Antimatter from laser pincers
    on July 22, 2021 at 4:16 pm

    In the depths of space, there are celestial bodies where extreme conditions prevail: Rapidly rotating neutron stars generate super-strong magnetic fields. And black holes, with their enormous gravitational pull, can cause huge, energetic jets of matter to shoot out into space. An international physics team with the participation of the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) has now proposed a new concept that could allow some of these extreme processes to be studied in the laboratory in […]

  • An X-ray vision-like camera to rapidly retrieve...
    on July 22, 2021 at 3:57 pm

    It's not exactly X-ray vision, but it's close. In research published in the journal Optica, University of California, Irvine researchers describe a new type of camera technology that, when aimed at an object, can rapidly retrieve 3D images, displaying its chemical content down to the micrometer scale. The new tech promises to help companies inspect things like the insides of computer chips without having to pry them open—an advancement the researchers say could accelerate the production time […]

  • Imaging tool under development exposes concealed...
    on July 22, 2021 at 1:39 pm

    Behold the neutron, the middle child of subatomic particles. At times overshadowed by its electrically charged siblings the proton and the electron, neutrons quietly play important roles in national security. They start nuclear reactions for weapons and power plants. They bombard materials for nuclear safety tests. And now they have a new skill: telling whether a concealed, electric detonator is charged.


Nature Physics - Issue - nature.com science feeds Nature Physics offers a unique mix of news and reviews alongside top-quality research papers. Published monthly, in print and online, the journal reflects the entire spectrum of physics, pure and applied.

  • Physics for a better world
    by Joseph J. Niemela on July 22, 2021 at 12:00 am

    Nature Physics, Published online: 22 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41567-021-01311-2The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals outline a roadmap towards a more equitable future for humanity. Along with other scientists, physicists have long made valuable contributions to this endeavour.

  • Author Correction: Strong-interaction matter:...
    by Ralf Rapp on July 21, 2021 at 12:00 am

    Nature Physics, Published online: 21 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41567-021-01322-zAuthor Correction: Strong-interaction matter: Fireball spectroscopy

  • Rechargeable self-assembled droplet microswimmers...
    by Diana Cholakova on July 15, 2021 at 12:00 am

    Nature Physics, Published online: 15 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41567-021-01291-3A class of synthetic microswimmers self-assembled from alkane oil drops in a surfactant solution offers a rechargeable platform for studying how microorganisms exploit flagellar elasticity to move around.

  • Detecting photoelectrons from spontaneously...
    by Keisuke Fukutani on July 15, 2021 at 12:00 am

    Nature Physics, Published online: 15 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41567-021-01289-xExcitons have been predicted to form spontaneously—without external excitation—in some materials. Low-temperature ARPES measurements on Ta2NiSe5 now provide evidence for such an excitonic insulator and for so-called preformed excitons.

  • Have tail, will travel
    by Sophie Ramananarivo on July 15, 2021 at 12:00 am

    Nature Physics, Published online: 15 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41567-021-01301-4The flagella of microorganisms have provided inspiration for many synthetic devices, but they’re typically not easy to produce. A new class of swimmer makes it look simple by spontaneously growing a tail that it can whip to self-propel.

  • Nature fights back
    by Mark Buchanan on July 12, 2021 at 12:00 am

    Nature Physics, Published online: 12 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41567-021-01295-zNature fights back

  • Hot emission by design
    by Nina Meinzer on July 12, 2021 at 12:00 am

    Nature Physics, Published online: 12 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41567-021-01306-zHot emission by design

  • Mistress of turbulence
    by Bart Verberck on July 12, 2021 at 12:00 am

    Nature Physics, Published online: 12 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41567-021-01305-0Mistress of turbulence


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Matter & Energy News -- ScienceDaily Detectors and electronics. Learn about every sort of detector, radar system and more from leading research institutes around the world.

  • Cascaded metasurfaces for dynamic control of THz...
    on July 23, 2021 at 4:14 pm

    Researchers have developed a general framework and metadevices for achieving dynamic control of THz wavefronts. Instead of locally controlling the individual meta-atoms in a THz metasurface (e.g., via PIN diode, varactor, etc.), they vary the polarization of a light beam with rotating multilayer cascaded metasurfaces.

  • Reverse optogenetic tool developed
    on July 23, 2021 at 2:53 pm

    A new optogenetic tool, a protein that can be controlled by light, has been characterized by researchers. They used an opsin -- a protein that occurs in the brain and eyes -- from zebrafish and introduced it into the brain of mice. Unlike other optogenetic tools, this opsin is not switched on but rather switched off by light. Experiments also showed that the tool could be suitable for investigating changes in the brain that are responsible for the development of epilepsy.

  • Bio-based coating for wood outperforms...
    on July 23, 2021 at 2:53 pm

    Researchers have used lignin, a natural polymer abundant in wood and other plant sources, to create a safe, low-cost and high-performing coating for use in construction. As there is a global urge to meet the rising sustainability standards, this new coating has great potential to protect wood, whose use in construction is continually increasing. The new coating is non-toxic, hydrofobic, it retains wood's breathability and natural roughness while being resistant to color changes and abrasion.

  • DeepMind and EMBL release the most complete...
    on July 23, 2021 at 1:56 pm

    DeepMind is partnering with EMBL to make the most complete and accurate database yet of the predicted human protein structures freely and openly available to the scientific community. The AlphaFold Protein Structure Database will enable research that advances understanding of these building blocks of life, accelerating research across a variety of fields. AlphaFold's impact is already being realized by early partners researching neglected diseases, studying antibiotic resistance, and recycling […]

  • Meet the Martian meteorite hunters
    on July 22, 2021 at 11:50 pm

    A team is paving the way for future rovers to search for meteorites on Mars. The scientists are using an extensive meteorite collection to test the spectral instruments destined for the ExoMars rover Rosalind Franklin, and develop tools to identify meteorites on the surface of the red planet.

  • 'Wrapping' anodes in 3D carbon nanosheets: The...
    on July 22, 2021 at 8:30 pm

    The lithium-ion battery is the future of sustainable energy technology, but drastic volume fluctuations in their anodes related to enhanced battery capacity raises a safety concern. Recently, researchers have found that embedding manganese selenide anodes in a 3D carbon nanosheet matrix is an innovative, simple, and low-cost means of reducing drastic volume expansion while improving the energy density of these batteries.

  • Soft skin patch could provide early warning for...
    on July 22, 2021 at 6:52 pm

    Engineers developed a soft, stretchy ultrasound patch that can be worn on the skin to monitor blood flow through vessels deep inside the body. Such a device can make it easier to detect cardiovascular problems, like blockages in the arteries that could lead to strokes or heart attacks.

  • Researchers develop tool to drastically speed up...
    on July 22, 2021 at 6:20 pm

    A new tool that enables thousands of tiny experiments to run simultaneously on a single polymer chip will let scientists study enzymes faster and more comprehensively than ever before.

  • Smartphone screens effective sensors for soil or...
    on July 22, 2021 at 5:13 pm

    The touchscreen technology used in billions of smartphones and tablets could also be used as a powerful sensor, without the need for any modifications.

  • Eco-friendly plastic from cellulose and water
    on July 22, 2021 at 5:13 pm

    Plastics offer many benefits to society and are widely used in our daily life: they are lightweight, cheap and adaptable. However, the production, processing and disposal of plastics pose a major global threat to the environment and human health. However, researchers have now found a sustainable method - 'hydrosetting', which uses water at normal conditions - to process and reshape a new type of hydroplastic polymer.