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Physics Central: Physics in Action (American Physical Society)
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Dictionary

Physical : (a) of or relating to physics (b) characterized or produced by the forces and operations of physics (c) having material existence : perceptible especially through the senses and subject to the laws of nature — Webster

OneLook, Free Dictionary, Wiktionary, Urban Dictionary

Realm : kingdom, sphere, domain — Webster

OneLook, Free Dictionary, Wiktionary, Urban Dictionary

Physical Realm : kingdom, sphere, or domain of things that have material existence and are perceptible, especially those things perceptible through the senses and subject to the laws of nature — M.E.Hopper

Encyclopedia

Physical universe In religion and esotericism, the term “physical universe” or “material universe” is used to distinguish the physical matter of the universe from a proposed spiritual or supernatural essence. — Wikipedia

Eric Weisstein’s World of Physics (ScienceWorld, Wolfram Research)
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Physical science is a branch of natural science that studies non-living systems, in contrast to life science. It in turn has many branches, each referred to as a “physical science”, together called the “physical sciences”. However, the term physical creates an unintended, somewhat arbitrary distinction, since many branches of physical science also study biological phenomena and branches of chemistry, such as organic chemistry. — Wikipedia

Encyclopædia Britannica

Physics is the natural science that studies matter and its motion and behavior through space and time and that studies the related entities of energy and force. Physics is one of the most fundamental scientific disciplines, and its main goal is to understand how the universe behaves. — Wikipedia

Encyclopædia Britannica

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What if?

What If? Answering your hypothetical questions with physics, every Tuesday.

  • Earth-Moon Fire Pole
    by xkcd on May 21, 2018 at 12:00 am

    <article class="entry"> <a href="//what-if.xkcd.com/157/"><h1>Earth-Moon Fire Pole</h1></a> <p id="question">My son (5y) asked me today: If there were a kind of a fireman&#39;s pole from the Moon down to the Earth, how long would it take to slide all the way from the Moon to the Earth?</p> <p id="attribute">Ramon Schönborn, Germany</p> <p>First, let&#39;s get a few things out of the […]

  • Electrofishing for Whales
    by xkcd on March 9, 2017 at 12:00 am

    <article class="entry"> <a href="//what-if.xkcd.com/156/"><h1>Electrofishing for Whales</h1></a> <p id="question">I used to work on a fisheries crew where we would use an electro-fisher backpack to momentarily stun small fish (30 - 100 mm length) so we could scoop them up with nets to identify and measure them. The larger fish tended to be stunned for slightly longer because of their larger surface area but I don&#39;t […]

  • Toaster vs. Freezer
    by xkcd on February 28, 2017 at 12:00 am

    <article class="entry"> <a href="//what-if.xkcd.com/155/"><h1>Toaster vs. Freezer</h1></a> <p id="question">Would a toaster still work in a freezer?</p> <p id="attribute">—<a href="http://www.maximumfun.org/shows/my-brother-my-brother-and-me">My Brother, My Brother and Me</a>, <a […]

  • Coast-to-Coast Coasting
    by xkcd on February 8, 2017 at 12:00 am

    <article class="entry"> <a href="//what-if.xkcd.com/154/"><h1>Coast-to-Coast Coasting</h1></a> <p id="question">What if the entire continental US was on a decreasing slope from West to East. How steep would the slope have to be to sustain the momentum needed to ride a bicycle the entire distance without pedaling?</p> <p id="attribute">—Brandon Rooks</p> <p>Too steep to actually build, […]

  • Hide the Atmosphere
    by xkcd on January 30, 2016 at 12:00 am

    <article class="entry"> <a href="//what-if.xkcd.com/153/"><h1>Hide the Atmosphere</h1></a> <p id="question">Earth’s atmosphere is really thin compared to the radius of the Earth. How big a hole do I need to dig before people suffocate?</p> <p id="attribute">—Sam Burke</p> <p>The idea here is straightforward: When you dig a hole in the ground, the hole fills up with air.<span […]

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EurekAlert! - Chemistry, Physics and Materials Sciences The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  • Tokyo Tech-led study shows how icy outer solar...
    on June 25, 2019 at 4:00 am

    (Tokyo Institute of Technology) Beyond the orbit of the planet Neptune, there are a multitude of icy and rocky small bodies, smaller than planets but larger than comets. These likely formed at the same time as the Solar System, and understanding their origin could provide important clues as to how the entire Solar System originated. Using sophisticated computer simulations and observations of TNOs, a Tokyo Tech-led team has shown how these so-called trans-Neptunian Objects (or TNOs) may have […]

  • Remote-controlled drug delivery implant size of...
    on June 25, 2019 at 4:00 am

    (Houston Methodist) People with chronic diseases like arthritis, diabetes and heart disease may one day forego the daily regimen of pills and, instead, receive a scheduled dosage of medication through a grape-sized implant that is remotely controlled. […]

  • UTSA to research environmental comfort at the San...
    on June 25, 2019 at 4:00 am

    (University of Texas at San Antonio) UTSA Center for Cultural Sustainability (CCS) has formed a partnership with local architecture firm to conduct a 12-month assessment of indoor climate management and make recommendations for energy-efficient upgrades at Mission Concepcion. The UTSA researchers anticipate that the results will serve as a model for other historic stone structures in hot-humid climates and become pioneers in the use of energy-efficient upgrades at the national cultural heritage […]

  • Researchers unveil how soft materials react to...
    on June 24, 2019 at 4:00 am

    (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, News Bureau) Before designing the next generation of soft materials, researchers must first understand how they behave during rapidly changing deformation. In a new study, researchers challenged previous assumptions regarding polymer behavior with newly developed laboratory techniques that measure polymer flow at the molecular level. […]

  • £3.54 million boost for Liverpool-based...
    on June 24, 2019 at 4:00 am

    (University of Liverpool) The University of Liverpool (UoL) and the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM) have been awarded £3.54 million for a research project that aims to develop a 'personalized health' approach to prevent and treat antimicrobial resistance (AMR). […]

  • Surrey researchers clear runway for tin based...
    on June 24, 2019 at 4:00 am

    (University of Surrey) Researchers at the University of Surrey believe their tin based perovskite solar cell could clear the runway for solar panel technology to take off and help the UK reach its 2050 carbon neutral goal. […]

  • A wearable vibration sensor for accurate voice...
    on June 24, 2019 at 4:00 am

    (Pohang University of Science & Technology (POSTECH)) Professor Kilwon Cho of Chemical Engineering and Professor Yoonyoung Chung of Electronic and Electric Engineering from POSTECH successfully developed a flexible and wearable vibration responsive sensor. When this sensor is attached to a neck, it can precisely recognize voice through vibration of the neck skin and is not affected by ambient noise or the volume of sound. […]

  • 'Bathtub rings' around Titan's lakes might be...
    on June 24, 2019 at 4:00 am

    (American Geophysical Union) The frigid lakeshores of Saturn's moon Titan might be encrusted with strange, unearthly minerals, according to new research being presented at the 2019 Astrobiology Science Conference, June 24-28, co-hosted by AGU and NASA in Bellevue, Wa. […]

  • Award for Nicolas Plumeré
    on June 24, 2019 at 4:00 am

    (Ruhr-University Bochum) Bochum-based chemist Professor Nicolas Plumeré has been awarded the Luigi Galvani Prize by the Bioelectrochemical Society. The prize is awarded every two years to a researcher who has made an outstanding contribution to the field of bioelectrochemistry. Plumeré has successfully optimised conductive hydrogels and polymers for bioelectrocatalytic systems. The prize was presented at the International Symposium on Bioelectrochemistry and Bioenergetics in […]

  • Researchers explain visible light from 2D lead...
    on June 24, 2019 at 4:00 am

    (University of Houston) Researchers led by an electrical engineer from the University of Houston have reported solving a lingering question about how a two-dimensional crystal composed of cesium, lead and bromine emitted a strong green light, opening the door to designing better light-emitting and diagnostic devices. […]


Physics News - Physics News, Material Sciences, Science News, Physics Physorg.com provides the latest news on physics, materials, nanotech, science and technology. Updated Daily.

  • Applying the Goldilocks principle to DNA structure
    on June 25, 2019 at 6:18 am

    The Goldilocks of fairy-tale fame knew something about porridge. It needed to be just right—neither too hot nor too cold. Same with furniture—neither too hard nor too soft. In a different context, scientists at UC San Diego know something about DNA. They know that the strands of our genetic code, if extended, would measure two meters, or about six feet. They also know that the strands fold into and move within the cell nucleus the size of about a hundredth of a millimeter. But they […]

  • Researchers explain visible light from 2-D lead...
    on June 24, 2019 at 8:22 pm

    Researchers drew attention three years ago when they reported that a two-dimensional perovskite—a material with a specific crystal structure—composed of cesium, lead and bromine emitted a strong green light. Crystals that produce light on the green spectrum are desirable because green light, while valuable in itself, can also be relatively easily converted to other forms that emit blue or red light, making it especially important for optical applications ranging from light-emitting […]

  • New theory for trapping light particles aims to...
    on June 24, 2019 at 8:19 pm

    Quantum computers, which use light particles (photons) instead of electrons to transmit and process data, hold the promise of a new era of research in which the time needed to realize lifesaving drugs and new technologies will be significantly shortened. Photons are promising candidates for quantum computation because they can propagate across long distances without losing information, but when they are stored in matter they become fragile and susceptible to decoherence. Now researchers with […]

  • Calibration method improves scientific research...
    on June 24, 2019 at 3:48 pm

    Although smartphones and other consumer cameras are increasingly used for scientific applications, it's difficult to compare and combine data from different devices. A new easy-to-use standardized method makes it possible for almost anyone to calibrate these cameras without any specialized equipment, helping amateurs, science students and professional scientists to acquire useful data with any consumer camera. […]

  • Targeting individual atoms
    on June 24, 2019 at 3:00 pm

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most important methods of physicochemical analysis. It can be used to determine precise molecular structures and dynamics. The importance of this method is also evidenced by the recognition of ETH Zurich's two latest Nobel laureates, Richard Ernst and Kurt Wüthrich, for their contributions to refining the method. […]

  • Researchers unveil how soft materials react to...
    on June 24, 2019 at 2:49 pm

    Before designing the next generation of soft materials, researchers must first understand how they behave during rapidly changing deformation. In a new study, researchers challenged previous assumptions regarding polymer behavior with newly developed laboratory techniques that measure polymer flow at the molecular level. […]

  • How to bend waves to arrive at the right place
    on June 24, 2019 at 1:30 pm

    Waves do not always spread uniformly into all directions, but can form a remarkable "branched flow." At TU Wien (Vienna) a method has now been developed to control this phenomenon. […]

  • Climbing droplets driven by mechanowetting on...
    on June 21, 2019 at 1:30 pm

    Modern applications use self-cleaning strategies and digital microfluids to control individual droplets of fluids on flat surfaces but existing techniques are limited by the side-effects of high electric fields and high temperatures. In a new study, Edwin De Jong and co-workers at the interdisciplinary departments of Advanced Materials, Mechanical Engineering and Complex Molecular Systems developed an innovative "mechanowetting" technique to control droplet motion on changing surfaces based on […]

  • Researchers make steps toward debugging tools for...
    on June 21, 2019 at 12:31 pm

    In classical computing, debugging programs is one of the most time-consuming tasks in software development. Successful debugging relies on software development tools and also on the experience of the programmer. In quantum computing, researchers predict debugging will be an even greater challenge. In a paper soon to appear at the ACM/IEEE 46th Annual International Symposium for Computer Architecture (as part of ACM's 2019 Federated Computing Research Conferences), researchers at Princeton […]

  • A new coating material that could help reduce...
    on June 21, 2019 at 12:30 pm

    A team of researchers from the University of Glasgow, the University of Strathclyde and Hobart and William Smith Colleges has developed a new coating for mirrors used on gravity detectors that is 25 times less noisy than mirror surfaces used on LIGO. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes how they made it and how well it performed during testing. […]


Nature Physics - Issue - nature.com science feeds Nature Physics offers a unique mix of news and reviews alongside top-quality research papers. Published monthly, in print and online, the journal reflects the entire spectrum of physics, pure and applied.

  • Quantum electrodynamics of a...
    by R. Kuzmin on June 24, 2019 at 12:00 am

    Nature Physics, Published online: 24 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41567-019-0553-1A Josephson junction array is used to show the phase mode associated with superconductivity surviving deep in the insulating regime at high frequency. This generates a device with an effective fine structure constant larger than unity. […]

  • Berry’s lesson for Lamb
    by Timothy E. Dowling on June 24, 2019 at 12:00 am

    Nature Physics, Published online: 24 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41567-019-0575-8A demonstration that Michael Berry’s legacy can inform our understanding of Lamb waves in stratified fluids serves as a reminder of the reach of topological thinking — as well as its potential utility. […]

  • Interlayer fractional quantum Hall effect in a...
    by Xiaomeng Liu on June 24, 2019 at 12:00 am

    Nature Physics, Published online: 24 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41567-019-0546-0Transport data reveal interlayer composite fermion fractional quantum Hall states in double-layer graphene. The authors also show that these can pair up to form an interlayer composite fermion exciton condensate. […]

  • Experimental few-copy multipartite entanglement...
    by Valeria Saggio on June 24, 2019 at 12:00 am

    Nature Physics, Published online: 24 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41567-019-0550-4A general scheme for a resource-efficient probabilistic detection of multipartite entanglement is demonstrated on six-partite cluster states. […]

  • Superconductivity in an insulator
    by Alexander D. Mirlin on June 24, 2019 at 12:00 am

    Nature Physics, Published online: 24 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41567-019-0580-yThe superconductor–insulator phase transition is a quantum phenomenon that reveals a competition between the superconducting phase order and charge localization. Now, microwave spectroscopy is shown to be a promising approach to investigate this effect in controllable one-dimensional Josephson arrays. […]

  • Restricted Boltzmann machines in quantum physics
    by Roger G. Melko on June 24, 2019 at 12:00 am

    Nature Physics, Published online: 24 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41567-019-0545-1A type of stochastic neural network called a restricted Boltzmann machine has been widely used in artificial intelligence applications for decades. They are now finding new life in the simulation of complex wavefunctions in quantum many-body physics. […]

  • Pairing states of composite fermions in...
    by J. I. A. Li on June 24, 2019 at 12:00 am

    Nature Physics, Published online: 24 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41567-019-0547-zIt is shown that composite fermions in the fractional quantum Hall regime form paired states in double-layer graphene. Pairing between layers gives a phase similar to an exciton condensate and pairing within a layer may lead to non-abelian states. […]

  • Topological transition in stratified fluids
    by Manolis Perrot on June 24, 2019 at 12:00 am

    Nature Physics, Published online: 24 June 2019; doi:10.1038/s41567-019-0561-1A prediction of the existence of trapped acoustic-gravity waves in stratified fluids provides a platform for probing topological phenomena in the lab—with possible implications for astrophysical and geophysical flows. […]


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Matter & Energy News -- ScienceDaily Detectors and electronics. Learn about every sort of detector, radar system and more from leading research institutes around the world.

  • Researchers create multi-junction solar cells...
    on June 24, 2019 at 8:11 pm

    In a proof-of-concept paper, researchers detail a new approach for creating multi-junction solar cells using off-the-shelf components, resulting in lower cost, high-efficiency solar cells for use in multiple applications. […]

  • Visible light from 2D lead halide perovskites...
    on June 24, 2019 at 6:04 pm

    Electrical engineers have reported solving a lingering question about how a two-dimensional crystal composed of cesium, lead and bromine emitted a strong green light, opening the door to designing better light-emitting and diagnostic devices. […]

  • Researchers teach robots what humans want
    on June 24, 2019 at 4:44 pm

    Researchers are developing better, faster ways of providing human guidance to autonomous robots. […]

  • Calibration method improves scientific research...
    on June 24, 2019 at 4:02 pm

    Although smartphones and other consumer cameras are increasingly used for scientific applications, it's difficult to compare and combine data from different devices. A new easy-to-use standardized method makes it possible for almost anyone to calibrate these cameras without any specialized equipment, helping amateurs, science students and professional scientists to acquire useful data with any consumer camera. […]

  • A wearable vibration sensor for accurate voice...
    on June 24, 2019 at 3:15 pm

    Scientists have developed a flexible and wearable vibration responsive sensor. When this sensor is attached to a neck, it can precisely recognize voice through vibration of the neck skin and is not affected by ambient noise or the volume of sound. […]

  • How to bend waves to arrive at the right place
    on June 24, 2019 at 3:15 pm

    Under certain circumstances, a wave can split into several paths, reaching some places with high intensity, while avoiding others almost completely. This kind of 'branched flow' has first been observed in 2001. Scientists have now developed a method to exploit this effect. The core idea of this new approach is to send a wave signal exclusively along one single pre-selected branch, such that the wave is hardly noticeable anywhere else. […]

  • Helping the body's ability to grow bone
    on June 24, 2019 at 3:15 pm

    For the first time, scientists have been able to study how well synthetic bone grafts stand up to the rigors and 'strains' of life, and how quickly they help bone re-grow and repair. […]

  • How soft materials react to deformation at...
    on June 24, 2019 at 3:15 pm

    Before designing the next generation of soft materials, researchers must first understand how they behave during rapidly changing deformation. In a new study, researchers challenged previous assumptions regarding polymer behavior with newly developed laboratory techniques that measure polymer flow at the molecular level. […]

  • Non-invasive view into the heart
    on June 24, 2019 at 3:14 pm

    The non-invasive measurement of blood flow to the heart using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is on par with cardiac catheterization. […]

  • More energy needed to cope with climate change
    on June 24, 2019 at 3:14 pm

    A new study found that by mid-century climate change will increase the demand for energy globally, even with modest warming. […]