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Physics Central: Physics in Action (American Physical Society)
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Dictionary

Physical : (a) of or relating to physics (b) characterized or produced by the forces and operations of physics (c) having material existence : perceptible especially through the senses and subject to the laws of nature — Webster

OneLook, Free Dictionary, Wiktionary, Urban Dictionary

Realm : kingdom, sphere, domain — Webster

OneLook, Free Dictionary, Wiktionary, Urban Dictionary

Physical Realm : kingdom, sphere, or domain of things that have material existence and are perceptible, especially those things perceptible through the senses and subject to the laws of nature — M.E.Hopper

Encyclopedia

Physical universe In religion and esotericism, the term “physical universe” or “material universe” is used to distinguish the physical matter of the universe from a proposed spiritual or supernatural essence. — Wikipedia

Eric Weisstein’s World of Physics (ScienceWorld, Wolfram Research)
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Physical science is a branch of natural science that studies non-living systems, in contrast to life science. It in turn has many branches, each referred to as a “physical science”, together called the “physical sciences”. However, the term physical creates an unintended, somewhat arbitrary distinction, since many branches of physical science also study biological phenomena and branches of chemistry, such as organic chemistry. — Wikipedia

Encyclopædia Britannica

Physics is the natural science that studies matter and its motion and behavior through space and time and that studies the related entities of energy and force. Physics is one of the most fundamental scientific disciplines, and its main goal is to understand how the universe behaves. — Wikipedia

Encyclopædia Britannica

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What if?

What If? Answering your hypothetical questions with physics, every Tuesday.

  • Earth-Moon Fire Pole
    by xkcd on May 21, 2018 at 12:00 am

    <article class="entry"> <a href="//what-if.xkcd.com/157/"><h1>Earth-Moon Fire Pole</h1></a> <p id="question">My son (5y) asked me today: If there were a kind of a fireman&#39;s pole from the Moon down to the Earth, how long would it take to slide all the way from the Moon to the Earth?</p> <p id="attribute">Ramon Schönborn, Germany</p> <p>First, let&#39;s get a few things out of the […]

  • Electrofishing for Whales
    by xkcd on March 9, 2017 at 12:00 am

    <article class="entry"> <a href="//what-if.xkcd.com/156/"><h1>Electrofishing for Whales</h1></a> <p id="question">I used to work on a fisheries crew where we would use an electro-fisher backpack to momentarily stun small fish (30 - 100 mm length) so we could scoop them up with nets to identify and measure them. The larger fish tended to be stunned for slightly longer because of their larger surface area but I don&#39;t […]

  • Toaster vs. Freezer
    by xkcd on February 28, 2017 at 12:00 am

    <article class="entry"> <a href="//what-if.xkcd.com/155/"><h1>Toaster vs. Freezer</h1></a> <p id="question">Would a toaster still work in a freezer?</p> <p id="attribute">—<a href="http://www.maximumfun.org/shows/my-brother-my-brother-and-me">My Brother, My Brother and Me</a>, <a […]

  • Coast-to-Coast Coasting
    by xkcd on February 8, 2017 at 12:00 am

    <article class="entry"> <a href="//what-if.xkcd.com/154/"><h1>Coast-to-Coast Coasting</h1></a> <p id="question">What if the entire continental US was on a decreasing slope from West to East. How steep would the slope have to be to sustain the momentum needed to ride a bicycle the entire distance without pedaling?</p> <p id="attribute">—Brandon Rooks</p> <p>Too steep to actually build, […]

  • Hide the Atmosphere
    by xkcd on January 30, 2016 at 12:00 am

    <article class="entry"> <a href="//what-if.xkcd.com/153/"><h1>Hide the Atmosphere</h1></a> <p id="question">Earth’s atmosphere is really thin compared to the radius of the Earth. How big a hole do I need to dig before people suffocate?</p> <p id="attribute">—Sam Burke</p> <p>The idea here is straightforward: When you dig a hole in the ground, the hole fills up with air.<span […]

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EurekAlert! - Chemistry, Physics and Materials Sciences The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  • Earth's most biodiverse ecosystems face a perfect...
    on January 26, 2020 at 5:00 am

    (Lancaster University) A combination of climate change, extreme weather and pressure from local human activity is causing a collapse in global biodiversity and ecosystems across the tropics, new research shows. The study, published today, mapped over 100 locations where tropical forests and coral reefs have been affected by climate extremes such as hurricanes, floods, heatwaves, droughts and fires.

  • A new twist on quantum communication in fiber
    on January 24, 2020 at 5:00 am

    (University of the Witwatersrand) New research done at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa, and Huazhang University of Science and Technology in Wuhan, China, has exciting implications for secure data transfer across optical fiber networks.

  • Blue-emitting diode demonstrates limitations and...
    on January 24, 2020 at 5:00 am

    (University of California - Berkeley) Halide perovskites have garnered attention because they're highly efficient at capturing energy in solar cells and efficient emitters in diodes. But researchers failed at making perovskite LEDs that emit blue light. UC Berkeley chemists succeeeded, but X-ray studies of the LED's structure show that it's very sensitive to temperature, humidity and chemical environment. Hence environmental and chemical control is essential for stable operation. But these […]

  • What goes up may actually be down
    on January 24, 2020 at 5:00 am

    (Frontiers) A new study in Frontiers in Neuroscience used virtual reality to determine how people plan their movements by 'seeing' gravity using visual cues in the landscape around them, rather than 'feeling it' through changes in weight and balance.

  • Can lithium halt progression of Alzheimer's...
    on January 24, 2020 at 5:00 am

    (McGill University) In a new study, a team of researchers at McGill University has shown that, when given in a formulation that facilitates passage to the brain, lithium in doses up to 400 times lower than what is currently being prescribed for mood disorders is capable of both halting signs of advanced Alzheimer's pathology and of recovering lost cognitive abilities.

  • Increasing opportunities for sustainable behavior
    on January 24, 2020 at 5:00 am

    (International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis) To mitigate climate change and safeguard ecosystems, we need to make drastic changes in our consumption and transport behaviors. A new IIASA study shows how even minor changes to available infrastructure can trigger tipping points in the collective adoption of sustainable behaviors.

  • High air pollution exposure in 1-year-olds linked...
    on January 24, 2020 at 5:00 am

    (Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center) A new study suggests that significant early childhood exposure to traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) is associated with structural changes in the brain at the age of 12.

  • Why eating yogurt may help lessen the risk of...
    on January 24, 2020 at 5:00 am

    (Lancaster University) One of the causes of breast cancer may be inflammation triggered by harmful bacteria suggest researchers. Scientists advise consuming natural yogurt, which contains beneficial bacteria which dampens inflammation and which is similar to the bacteria found in breastfeeding mothers. Their suggestion is that this bacteria is protective because breast feeding reduces the risk of breast cancer. The consumption of yogurt is also associated with a reduction in the risk of breast […]

  • Deciphering the sugar code
    on January 24, 2020 at 5:00 am

    (University of Münster) Like animals and humans, plants possess a kind of immune system. It can e.g. recognize pathogenic fungi by the chitin in their cell walls, triggering disease resistance. Some fungi hide from the immune system by modifying some of the chitin building blocks, converting chitin into chitosan. Researchers of the University of Münster now found that plants can react to a certain pattern in this chitosan, stimulating their immune system.

  • Quantum physics: On the way to quantum networks
    on January 24, 2020 at 5:00 am

    (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München) Physicists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich, together with colleagues at Saarland University, have successfully demonstrated the transport of an entangled state between an atom and a photon via an optic fiber over a distance of up to 20 km -- thus setting a new record.


Physics News - Physics News, Material Sciences, Science News, Physics Physorg.com provides the latest news on physics, materials, nanotech, science and technology. Updated Daily.

  • A new twist on quantum communication in fiber
    on January 24, 2020 at 7:00 pm

    New research done at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa, and Huazhang University of Science and Technology in Wuhan, China, has exciting implications for secure data transfer across optical fiber networks. The team have demonstrated that multiple quantum patterns of twisted light can be transmitted across a conventional fiber link that, paradoxically, supports only one pattern. The implication is a new approach to realizing a future quantum network, harnessing […]

  • Going with the flow: New insights into mysterious...
    on January 24, 2020 at 7:00 pm

    Water issuing from an ordinary faucet tells a complex tale of its journey through a pipe. At high velocities, the faucet's gushing stream is turbulent: chaotic, disorderly—like the crash of ocean waves.

  • Adding memory to pressure-sensitive phosphors
    on January 24, 2020 at 3:30 pm

    Mechanoluminescence (ML) is a type of luminescence induced by any mechanical action on a solid, leading to a range of applications in materials research, photonics and optics. For instance, the mechanical action can release energy previously stored in the crystal lattice of phosphor via trapped charge carriers. However, the method has limits when recording ML emissions during a pressure-induced event. In a new study, Robin R. Petit and a research team at the LumiLab, Department of Solid State […]

  • On the way to quantum networks
    on January 24, 2020 at 2:29 pm

    Physicists at LMU, together with colleagues at Saarland University, have successfully demonstrated the transport of an entangled state between an atom and a photon via an optic fiber over a distance of up to 20 km—thus setting a new record.

  • Discovery sheds new light on how cells move
    on January 24, 2020 at 12:58 pm

    When we cut our skin, groups of cells rush en masse to the site to heal the wound.

  • Quantum experiments explore power of light for...
    on January 23, 2020 at 5:51 pm

    A team from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has conducted a series of experiments to gain a better understanding of quantum mechanics and pursue advances in quantum networking and quantum computing, which could lead to practical applications in cybersecurity and other areas.

  • New phase diagrams of superfluid helium under...
    on January 23, 2020 at 2:43 pm

    Physicists have been studying superfluid 3He under nanoscale confinement for several years now, as this unique liquid presents a rich variety of phases with complex order parameters that can be stabilized. While past studies have gathered many interesting observations, a complete and reliable picture of superfluid 3He under confinement has yet to be attained.

  • Ghostly particles detected in condensates of...
    on January 23, 2020 at 12:24 pm

    Bose-condensed quantum fluids are not forever. Such states include superfluids and Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs).

  • Mapping the path of climate change
    on January 22, 2020 at 6:17 pm

    Since 1880, the Earth's temperature has risen by 1.9 degrees Fahrenheit and is predicted to continue rising, according to the NASA Global Climate Change website. Scientists are actively seeking to understand this change and its effect on Earth's ecosystems and residents.

  • Signals from inside the Earth: Borexino...
    on January 22, 2020 at 6:15 pm

    Scientists involved in the Borexino collaboration have presented new results for the measurement of neutrinos originating from the interior of the Earth. The elusive "ghost particles" rarely interact with matter, making their detection difficult. With this update, the researchers have now been able to access 53 events—almost twice as many as in the previous analysis of the data from the Borexino detector, which is located 1,400 metres below the Earth's surface in the Gran Sasso massif […]


Nature Physics - Issue - nature.com science feeds Nature Physics offers a unique mix of news and reviews alongside top-quality research papers. Published monthly, in print and online, the journal reflects the entire spectrum of physics, pure and applied.

  • Dynein harnesses active fluctuations of...
    by Yasin Ezber on January 20, 2020 at 12:00 am

    Nature Physics, Published online: 20 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41567-019-0757-4The motor protein dynein is associated with microtubule force generation in the cell; how it interacts with cytoskeletal fluctuations is still an open question. Here the authors show that dynein can harness these fluctuations to generate power and move faster towards the minus-end of microtubules.

  • Many-body physics with individually controlled...
    by Antoine Browaeys on January 20, 2020 at 12:00 am

    Nature Physics, Published online: 20 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41567-019-0733-zThis Review Article outlines the techniques necessary for the manipulation of neutral atoms and making use of their interactions, when excited to Rydberg states, to achieve the goal of quantum simulation of many-body physics.

  • Bioelectrical domain walls in homogeneous tissues
    by Harold M. McNamara on January 20, 2020 at 12:00 am

    Nature Physics, Published online: 20 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41567-019-0765-4A detailed theoretical and experimental investigation of homogeneous cell tissues finds that they can undergo spontaneous spatial symmetry breaking through a purely electrophysiological mechanism.

  • Echo in a single vibrationally excited molecule
    by Junjie Qiang on January 20, 2020 at 12:00 am

    Nature Physics, Published online: 20 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41567-019-0762-7Following an impulsive laser excitation of a single molecule, a dispersed vibrational wave-packet is partially rephased by a second pulse, and a wave-packet echo is observed. This wave-packet echo probes ultrafast intramolecular processes in the isolated molecule.

  • Network experiment demonstrates converse symmetry...
    by Ferenc Molnar on January 20, 2020 at 12:00 am

    Nature Physics, Published online: 20 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41567-019-0742-yAn experiment with three alternating-current generators demonstrates converse symmetry breaking—a phenomenon whereby the system achieves frequency synchronization when its component systems are tuned asymmetrically.

  • Publisher Correction: Mathematical languages...
    by Nicolas Gisin on January 16, 2020 at 12:00 am

    Nature Physics, Published online: 16 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41567-020-0794-zPublisher Correction: Mathematical languages shape our understanding of time in physics

  • Electromagnetically induced transparency at a...
    by Changqing Wang on January 13, 2020 at 12:00 am

    Nature Physics, Published online: 13 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41567-019-0746-7The optical analogue of electromagnetically induced transparency and absorption can be modulated by chiral optical states at an exceptional point, which is shown in a system of indirectly coupled microresonators.

  • Negative representation and instability in...
    by Alexander F. Siegenfeld on January 13, 2020 at 12:00 am

    Nature Physics, Published online: 13 January 2020; doi:10.1038/s41567-019-0739-6In a mathematical model of democratic elections, electoral instability is shown to be linked to negative representation, which occurs when a shift in electoral opinions pushes the election outcome in the opposite direction.


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Matter & Energy News -- ScienceDaily Detectors and electronics. Learn about every sort of detector, radar system and more from leading research institutes around the world.

  • 'Jumping genes' help stabilize DNA folding...
    on January 24, 2020 at 8:51 pm

    The DNA molecule inside the nucleus of any human cell is more than six feet long. To fit into such a small space, it must fold into precise loops that also govern how genes are turned on or off. New research indicates that 'jumping genes' play a surprising role in stabilizing the 3D folding patterns of the DNA molecule inside the cell's nucleus.

  • Blue-emitting diode demonstrates limitations and...
    on January 24, 2020 at 8:51 pm

    Halide perovskites have garnered attention because they're highly efficient at capturing energy in solar cells and efficient emitters in diodes. But researchers failed at making perovskite LEDs that emit blue light. Chemists succeeded, but X-ray studies of the LED's structure show that it's very sensitive to temperature, humidity and chemical environment. Hence environmental and chemical control is essential for stable operation. But these properties also allow for potentially broader use, such […]

  • Going with the flow: New insights into mysterious...
    on January 24, 2020 at 8:51 pm

    Scientists gain a deeper understanding of turbulent and transitional pipe flows.

  • Assessing risk of chemicals to wildlife is huge...
    on January 24, 2020 at 5:55 pm

    Computer modelling and long-term ecological monitoring will be essential to assess the environmental risks of the rapidly growing number of chemicals across the world, according to a new review paper.

  • Quantum physics: On the way to quantum networks
    on January 24, 2020 at 5:45 pm

    Physicists have successfully demonstrated the transport of an entangled state between an atom and a photon via an optic fiber over a distance of up to 20 km -- thus setting a new record.

  • Principles for a green chemistry future
    on January 24, 2020 at 5:45 pm

    Researchers show how green chemistry is essential for a sustainable future.

  • Engineers examine lithium battery defects
    on January 24, 2020 at 5:45 pm

    Lithium dendrites cause poor performance and even explosions in batteries with flammable liquid electrolytes. How these dendrites grow, even with a solid electrolytes, is still a mystery, but materials engineers study the conditions that enable dendrites and how to stop them.

  • Commercial air travel is safer than ever
    on January 24, 2020 at 5:45 pm

    It has never been safer to fly on commercial airlines, according to a new study that tracks the continued decrease in passenger fatalities around the globe.

  • New stretchable battery can power wearable...
    on January 24, 2020 at 3:45 pm

    The adoption of wearable electronics has so far been limited by their need to derive power from bulky, rigid batteries that reduce comfort and may present safety hazards due to chemical leakage or combustion. Researchers have now developed a soft and stretchable battery that relies on a special type of plastic to store power more safely than the flammable formulations used in conventional batteries today.

  • Predictive touch response mechanism is a step...
    on January 23, 2020 at 8:26 pm

    A team of researchers has developed a method for enhancing haptic feedback experiences in human-to-machine applications that are typical in the Tactile Internet.