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Galaxy Milky Way, Andromeda
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Trans-Neptunian Object
Kuiper Belt Pluto, Haumea, Makemake
Scattered Disc Eris, Sedna, Planet X
Oort Cloud Etc. Scholz’s Star
Small Body Comet, Centaur, Asteroid

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Physical Laws (Constants) Relativity
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Force Gravity, Electromagnetism (Light, Color)

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These are organized by a classification scheme developed exclusively for Cosma. More…

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Physics Central: Physics in Action (American Physical Society)
Physical Sciences Subject Guide (Library of Congress)
Introductory Physics Science Tracer Bullet (Library of Congress)
Physics Resources (Library of Congress)
Physics Internet Resources (Library of Congress)

Physical Science Subject Primer (National Network of Libraries of Medicine)
Physics Subject Primer (National Network of Libraries of Medicine)

Physics World
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CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics Online (99th Edition)

Natural and Physical Sciences Portal (Wikipedia)
Physical Sciences Portal (Wikipedia)
Physics Portal (Wikipedia)

Dictionary

Physical : (a) of or relating to physics (b) characterized or produced by the forces and operations of physics (c) having material existence : perceptible especially through the senses and subject to the laws of nature — Webster

OneLook, Free Dictionary, Wiktionary, Urban Dictionary

Realm : kingdom, sphere, domain — Webster

OneLook, Free Dictionary, Wiktionary, Urban Dictionary

Physical Realm : kingdom, sphere, or domain of things that have material existence and are perceptible, especially those things perceptible through the senses and subject to the laws of nature — M.E.Hopper

Encyclopedia

Physical universe In religion and esotericism, the term “physical universe” or “material universe” is used to distinguish the physical matter of the universe from a proposed spiritual or supernatural essence. — Wikipedia

Eric Weisstein’s World of Physics (ScienceWorld, Wolfram Research)
Encyclopædia Britannica

Outline


Outline of Physical Science (Wikipedia)
Outline of Physics (Wikipedia)

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Philosophy

Philosophical research online: Philosophy of Physical Science (PhilPapers)

Science

Physical science is a branch of natural science that studies non-living systems, in contrast to life science. It in turn has many branches, each referred to as a “physical science”, together called the “physical sciences”. However, the term physical creates an unintended, somewhat arbitrary distinction, since many branches of physical science also study biological phenomena and branches of chemistry, such as organic chemistry. — Wikipedia

Encyclopædia Britannica

Physics is the natural science that studies matter and its motion and behavior through space and time and that studies the related entities of energy and force. Physics is one of the most fundamental scientific disciplines, and its main goal is to understand how the universe behaves. — Wikipedia

Encyclopædia Britannica

Physics Center (Martindale’s Reference Desk)
Encyclopedia of Physics

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Humor


What if?

What If? Answering your hypothetical questions with physics, every Tuesday.

  • Earth-Moon Fire Pole
    by xkcd on May 21, 2018 at 12:00 am

    <article class="entry"> <a href="//what-if.xkcd.com/157/"><h1>Earth-Moon Fire Pole</h1></a> <p id="question">My son (5y) asked me today: If there were a kind of a fireman&#39;s pole from the Moon down to the Earth, how long would it take to slide all the way from the Moon to the Earth?</p> <p id="attribute">Ramon Schönborn, Germany</p> <p>First, let&#39;s get a few things out of the […]

  • Electrofishing for Whales
    by xkcd on March 9, 2017 at 12:00 am

    <article class="entry"> <a href="//what-if.xkcd.com/156/"><h1>Electrofishing for Whales</h1></a> <p id="question">I used to work on a fisheries crew where we would use an electro-fisher backpack to momentarily stun small fish (30 - 100 mm length) so we could scoop them up with nets to identify and measure them. The larger fish tended to be stunned for slightly longer because of their larger surface area but I don&#39;t […]

  • Toaster vs. Freezer
    by xkcd on February 28, 2017 at 12:00 am

    <article class="entry"> <a href="//what-if.xkcd.com/155/"><h1>Toaster vs. Freezer</h1></a> <p id="question">Would a toaster still work in a freezer?</p> <p id="attribute">—<a href="http://www.maximumfun.org/shows/my-brother-my-brother-and-me">My Brother, My Brother and Me</a>, <a […]

  • Coast-to-Coast Coasting
    by xkcd on February 8, 2017 at 12:00 am

    <article class="entry"> <a href="//what-if.xkcd.com/154/"><h1>Coast-to-Coast Coasting</h1></a> <p id="question">What if the entire continental US was on a decreasing slope from West to East. How steep would the slope have to be to sustain the momentum needed to ride a bicycle the entire distance without pedaling?</p> <p id="attribute">—Brandon Rooks</p> <p>Too steep to actually build, […]

  • Hide the Atmosphere
    by xkcd on January 30, 2016 at 12:00 am

    <article class="entry"> <a href="//what-if.xkcd.com/153/"><h1>Hide the Atmosphere</h1></a> <p id="question">Earth’s atmosphere is really thin compared to the radius of the Earth. How big a hole do I need to dig before people suffocate?</p> <p id="attribute">—Sam Burke</p> <p>The idea here is straightforward: When you dig a hole in the ground, the hole fills up with air.<span […]

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EurekAlert! - Chemistry, Physics and Materials Sciences The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  • Optics and photonics researcher receives $1.7...
    on October 1, 2020 at 4:00 am

    (University of Central Florida) University of Central Florida Assistant Professor Kyu Young Han was awarded a five-year $1.7 million NIH grant to develop a novel bioengineering tool and imaging system to enable researchers to image multiple proteins in a single cell under a super-resolution microscope.

  • Tunable free-electron X-ray radiation from van...
    on October 1, 2020 at 4:00 am

    (Technion-Israel Institute of Technology) The suggested apparatus produces controlled radiation with a narrow spectrum that can be tuned with high resolution, at a relatively low energy investment. The findings are likely to lead to breakthroughs in a variety of fields, including the analysis of chemicals and biological materials, medical imaging, X-ray equipment for security screening, and other uses of accurate X-ray sources

  • Why drugs sometimes cause receptor potentiation...
    on October 1, 2020 at 4:00 am

    (Ruhr-University Bochum) In order to treat certain brain diseases more precisely and with fewer side effects, researchers are focusing on drugs that only inhibit distinct subtypes of the receptors responding to the neurotransmitter glutamate. However, under certain conditions, such drugs can elicit the opposite effect: Rather than inhibiting the receptors as desired, they potentiate their activity.

  • Pain relief caused by SARS-CoV-2 infection may...
    on October 1, 2020 at 4:00 am

    (University of Arizona Health Sciences) New research shows SARS-CoV-2 promotes pain relief when it infects cells through a common protein receptor, neuropilin-1. The finding gives scientists a novel target for non-opioid pain therapeutics, while also offering an explanation for the unrelenting spread of COVID-19.

  • Ultrasensitive microwave detector developed
    on October 1, 2020 at 4:00 am

    (Pohang University of Science & Technology (POSTECH)) A joint international research team from POSTECH of South Korea, Raytheon BBN Technologies, Harvard University, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the U.S., Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology in Spain, and the National Institute for Materials Science in Japan have together developed ultrasensitive sensors that can detect microwaves with the highest theoretically possible sensitivity.

  • Tumor progression depends on the tumor...
    on October 1, 2020 at 4:00 am

    (Tokyo Medical and Dental University) Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) and Niigata University identified a novel mechanism by which tumors progress. By studying the role of TNF-α and TGF-β in the formation of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), the researchers found that both proteins together exert a robust effect on the development of CAFs. They further found that oral cancer cells show increased tumor progression in response to TGF-β protein secreted from […]

  • Nurture trumps nature in determining severity of...
    on October 1, 2020 at 4:00 am

    (Yale University) Researchers at Yale and elsewhere previously identified a host of genetic risk factors that help explain why some veterans are especially susceptible to the debilitating symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

  • Record-breaking, floating laser resonator
    on October 1, 2020 at 4:00 am

    (Technion-Israel Institute of Technology) Physical Review X recently reported on a new optical resonator from the Technion - Israel Institute of Technology that is unprecedented in resonance enhancement. Developed by graduate student Jacob Kher-Alden under the supervision of Professor Tal Carmon, the Technion-born resonator has record-breaking capabilities in resonance enhancement.

  • Repurposed anti-malarial compounds kill diarrheal...
    on October 1, 2020 at 4:00 am

    (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, News Bureau) A class of compounds used for malaria treatment also kill the intestinal parasite Cryptosporidium, a leading cause of diarrheal disease and death in children that has no cure, a multi-institution collaboration of researchers found in a new study.

  • Our health: New focus on the synergy effect of...
    on October 1, 2020 at 4:00 am

    (University of Southern Denmark) Nanoparticles are valuable and useful in many products, but according to a new study, they can also damage our cells. Researchers are concerned about the effect of lifelong exposure to the human organism.


Physics News - Physics News, Material Sciences, Science News, Physics Physorg.com provides the latest news on physics, materials, nanotech, science and technology. Updated Daily.

  • Tunable free-electron X-ray radiation from van...
    on October 1, 2020 at 5:32 pm

    Technion researchers have developed accurate radiation sources that are expected to lead to breakthroughs in medical imaging and other areas. They have developed precise radiation sources that may replace the expensive and cumbersome facilities currently used for such tasks. The suggested apparatus produces controlled radiation with a narrow spectrum that can be tuned with high resolution, at a relatively low energy investment. The findings are likely to lead to breakthroughs in a variety of […]

  • Einstein's description of gravity just got much...
    on October 1, 2020 at 3:00 pm

    Einstein's theory of general relativity—the idea that gravity is matter warping spacetime—has withstood over 100 years of scrutiny and testing, including the newest test from the Event Horizon Telescope collaboration, published today in the latest issue of Physical Review Letters.

  • Record-breaking, floating laser resonator
    on October 1, 2020 at 2:41 pm

    Physical Review X recently reported on a new optical resonator from the Technion—Israel Institute of Technology that is unprecedented in resonance enhancement. Developed by graduate student Jacob Kher-Alden under the supervision of Professor Tal Carmon, the Technion-born resonator has record-breaking capabilities in resonance enhancement.

  • Detection of gravitational wave 'lensing' could...
    on October 1, 2020 at 2:28 pm

    Gravitational wave scientists looking for evidence of "lensing," in which the faintest gravitational wave signals become amplified, are unlikely to make these detections in the near future according to new analysis by scientists at the University of Birmingham.

  • What tiny surfing robots teach us about surface...
    on October 1, 2020 at 1:51 pm

    Propelled by chemical changes in surface tension, microrobots surfing across fluid interfaces lead researchers to new ideas.

  • Timing the life of antimatter particles may lead...
    on October 1, 2020 at 10:59 am

    Experts in Japan have devised a simple way to glean more detailed information out of standard medical imaging scans. A research team made up of atomic physicists and nuclear medicine experts at the University of Tokyo and the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) has designed a timer that can enable positron emission tomography (PET) scanners to detect the oxygen concentration of tissues throughout patients' bodies. This upgrade to PET scanners may lead to a future of better cancer […]

  • Stellar explosion in Earth's proximity
    on September 30, 2020 at 4:59 pm

    When the brightness of the star Betelgeuse dropped dramatically a few months ago, some observers suspected an impending supernova—a stellar explosion that could also cause damage on Earth. While Betelgeuse has returned to normal, physicists from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have found evidence of a supernova that exploded near the Earth around 2.5 million years ago.

  • New detector breakthrough pushes boundaries of...
    on September 30, 2020 at 3:00 pm

    Physicists at Aalto University and VTT Technical Research Center of Finland have developed a new detector for measuring energy quanta at unprecedented resolution. This discovery could help bring quantum computing out of the laboratory and into real-world applications. The results have been published today in Nature.

  • D-Wave announces launch of new Advantage quantum...
    on September 30, 2020 at 2:20 pm

    Canadian based D-Wave has announced on its blog that it has developed a new quantum computer for use by businesses. Called Advantage, the new system has 5,000 qubits and 15-way qubit connectivity. The new machine will be made available to business customers over the Internet via the Leap quantum cloud service.

  • Achieving invisibility: Cross-wavelength...
    on September 30, 2020 at 2:10 pm

    Invisibility is a superior self-protection strategy of long-standing interest in academia and industry, although the concept is thus far most popularly encountered in science fiction. In a new report on Science Advances, Su Xu and colleagues in engineering, nanotechnology, nanobionics and quantum information in China were inspired by the natural ecological relationship between transparent oceanic animals and their predators that employ a cross-wavelength detection strategy. The scientists […]


Nature Physics - Issue - nature.com science feeds Nature Physics offers a unique mix of news and reviews alongside top-quality research papers. Published monthly, in print and online, the journal reflects the entire spectrum of physics, pure and applied.

  • Perovskite fever
    by Mark Buchanan on October 1, 2020 at 12:00 am

    Nature Physics, Published online: 01 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41567-020-01060-8Perovskite fever

  • Ising model for strings
    by Richard Brierley on October 1, 2020 at 12:00 am

    Nature Physics, Published online: 01 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41567-020-01065-3Ising model for strings

  • Flattening the band
    by Nina Meinzer on October 1, 2020 at 12:00 am

    Nature Physics, Published online: 01 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41567-020-01072-4Flattening the band

  • Mind the gap
    by Stefanie Reichert on October 1, 2020 at 12:00 am

    Nature Physics, Published online: 01 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41567-020-01067-1Mind the gap

  • A noisy orchestra
    by Elizaveta Dubrovina on October 1, 2020 at 12:00 am

    Nature Physics, Published online: 01 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41567-020-01064-4A noisy orchestra

  • Across the city
    by Yun Li on October 1, 2020 at 12:00 am

    Nature Physics, Published online: 01 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41567-020-01066-2Across the city

  • Metrology on a grand scale
    by John Villanueva Jr on October 1, 2020 at 12:00 am

    Nature Physics, Published online: 01 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41567-020-01059-1The assembly of the more than a million single parts of the ITER tokamak requires large-scale three-dimensional precision metrology. John Villanueva Jr gives us insights into the complexity of this project.

  • 15 years of Nature Physics
    by Alison Wright on October 1, 2020 at 12:00 am

    Nature Physics, Published online: 01 October 2020; doi:10.1038/s41567-020-01051-9Over the last 15 years, the content of Nature Physics has covered an enormous breadth of subjects at the forefront of physics. The journal’s past and present editors recount their favourite papers and what made chaperoning them to publication special.


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Matter & Energy News -- ScienceDaily Detectors and electronics. Learn about every sort of detector, radar system and more from leading research institutes around the world.

  • Greenland is on track to lose ice faster than in...
    on September 30, 2020 at 3:42 pm

    If human societies don't sharply curb emissions of greenhouse gases, Greenland's rate of ice loss this century is likely to greatly outpace that of any century over the past 12,000 years, a new study concludes. Scientists say the results reiterate the need for countries around the world to take action now to reduce emissions, slow the decline of ice sheets, and mitigate sea level rise.

  • Breaking COVID-19's 'clutch' to stop its spread
    on September 30, 2020 at 12:51 pm

    The virus that causes COVID-19 uses a clutch-like shifter to enable transcription of one RNA string into multiple proteins, and therein lies a vulnerability. A proof-of-concept study shows it's possible to eliminate that shifter with an RNA-binding compound linked to a 'trash this' signal.

  • Many ventilation systems may increase risk of...
    on September 29, 2020 at 5:03 pm

    Ventilation systems in many modern office buildings, which are designed to keep temperatures comfortable and increase energy efficiency, may increase the risk of exposure to the coronavirus, particularly during the coming winter, according to new research.

  • Untapped potential exists for blending...
    on September 29, 2020 at 4:37 pm

    Hybrid systems of floating solar panels and hydropower plants may hold the technical potential to produce a significant portion of the electricity generated annually across the globe, according to a new analysis.

  • The key to lowering CO2 emissions is made of metal
    on September 29, 2020 at 4:36 pm

    Researchers produce malic acid, which contains 4 carbon atoms, through artificial photosynthesis by simply adding metal ions like aluminum and iron. This solves a problem with current artificial photosynthesis technology of only producing molecules with 1 carbon atom and paves the way to exploring the use of CO2 as a raw material.

  • Validating the physics behind the new fusion...
    on September 29, 2020 at 4:35 pm

    SPARC is planned to be the first experimental device ever to achieve a 'burning plasma' -- a self-sustaining fusion reaction in which different isotopes of the element hydrogen fuse together to form helium, without the need for any further input of energy.

  • Wearable exosuit that lessens muscle fatigue...
    on September 29, 2020 at 4:35 pm

    A new clothing-like exoskeleton can reduce back muscle fatigue and providing needed physical relief to material handlers, medical professionals and frontline workers.

  • Filtering radioactive elements from water
    on September 29, 2020 at 4:34 pm

    Researchers previously developed a filter membrane made out of whey proteins and activated carbon. In a new study, they now demonstrate just how efficient this membrane is at filtering radioactive elements from contaminated water.

  • Machine learning homes in on catalyst...
    on September 29, 2020 at 4:34 pm

    A machine learning technique rapidly rediscovered rules governing catalysts that took humans years of difficult calculations to reveal -- and even explained a deviation. The team that developed the technique believes other researchers will be able to use it to make faster progress in designing materials for a variety of purposes.

  • Why disordered light-harvesting systems produce...
    on September 29, 2020 at 4:33 pm

    Scientists typically prefer to work with ordered systems. However, a diverse team of physicists and biophysicists found that individual light-harvesting nanotubes with disordered molecular structures still transport light energy in the same way. By combining spectroscopy, molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical physics, they discovered how disorder at the molecular level is effectively averaged out at the microscopic scale.